The United States of America (“the United States”) and Mongolia, hereinafter the “Participants,”

Recognizing the July 31, 2019 Joint Declaration on the Strategic Partnership between the United States of America and Mongolia as well as the joint designation by the United States and Mongolia of 2019 as the “U.S.-Mongolia Year of Youth;”

Acknowledging the respective leadership roles and responsibilities of the United States Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office) and Mongolia’s Ministry of Justice and Home Affairs (MOJHA), Office of the Prosecutor General (OPG), Ministry of Labor and Social Protection (MLSP), and the other agencies of the National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons in the fight against human trafficking;

Reflecting on Mongolia’s commitment to achieve the protection, prosecution, and prevention objectives of its 2017-2021 National Program to Combat Trafficking in Persons and the findings and recommendations of the 2019 Trafficking in Persons Report;

Noting our shared concern about the lasting psychological, physical, and developmental consequences of sex trafficking and forced labor for child victims; the increasing reports of commercial sexual exploitation of Mongolian children; the recognized risks associated with children’s increasing use of the internet; and our interest in partnering to improve efforts to prevent traffickers from exploiting children;

Seeking to complement existing and ongoing cooperation between the United States and Mongolia on matters related to child trafficking, including programs funded by the TIP Office to improve victim-centered investigations and prosecutions of trafficking in persons cases in Mongolia, and programs funded by the Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs to improve the multidisciplinary response to domestic violence, police enforcement, and border security action to prevent and interdict human trafficking cases;

Desiring to conclude this Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership in a manner that builds on the strong foundation of the Mongolian government’s anti-trafficking efforts to achieve improved, sustainable policies and practices that ensure effective interagency coordination and collaboration on child trafficking protection and prosecution efforts, hold perpetrators of child trafficking criminally accountable, provide comprehensive protective services for child victims, and prevent child trafficking from occurring in Mongolia;

Have reached the following understandings:

I.  Context for a potential partnership on child trafficking

A.  While Mongolia has increased its efforts to prosecute traffickers and identify and assist trafficking victims, few child victims of trafficking have been identified and protected and few cases of child sex trafficking – and even fewer cases of forced child labor – have been investigated and prosecuted.

B.  Agencies responsible for responding to reports of suspected child trafficking in Mongolia and providing protective care have reported a shortage of specialized shelter space, psychological counseling, and comprehensive services for child victims of trafficking, as well as challenges to the provision of timely victim and witness protection.

C.  Agencies have also acknowledged that increased interagency/multidisciplinary coordination of efforts is needed to effectively investigate and prosecute cases of child trafficking while ensuring the provision of comprehensive protective services from the time a child victim is identified through community reintegration.

D.  Criminal justice professionals have requested advanced training on implementing Mongolia’s new anti-trafficking legislation, specialized techniques for victim-centered investigations and prosecutions in child trafficking cases, and investigation of cyber-facilitated human trafficking.

E.  The lack of a sufficient number of labor inspectors and child rights officers, labor inspectors trained on laws related to the worst forms of child labor, and a legal framework that does not permit unannounced inspections has impeded the identification of child victims of forced labor.

F.  Members of the Mongolian National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons have expressed the need for greater public awareness of the indicators of child trafficking, including child sex trafficking, forced child labor, and online enticement and recruitment of children, as well as increased community understanding of how to respond when a suspected case is identified in a community.

G.  Numerous civil society, international, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) with expertise in child protection and combating human trafficking currently operate within Mongolia and contribute substantially by identifying trafficking victims and providing services.

H.  Although Mongolia has established one-stop service centers for victims of domestic violence in Ulaanbaatar and several provinces, timely multidisciplinary treatment and medical forensic services are often not available for child trafficking victims.

II.  Benefits, Intentions, and Commitments of a CPC Partnership between the United States and Mongolia

This CPC Partnership between the United States and Mongolia is a jointly developed and jointly implemented four-year plan intended to strengthen the capacity of the Mongolian government as well as NGO and civil society organizations to address child sex trafficking and forced child labor in Mongolia and thereby strengthen existing efforts to eradicate these crimes.  With the signing of this CPC Partnership, the Participants commit to the following over the four-year duration of the Partnership.

A.  The TIP Office intends to provide approximately $5 million in U.S. foreign assistance to nongovernmental and/or international organizations that will collaborate and cooperate with relevant agency members of the National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons to support implementation of activities under the objectives described in Section IV and in Appendix B: S.-Mongolia CPC Partnership Implementation Plan. The TIP Office will select implementing partners through a competitive grant process after the signing of the CPC Partnership, will support the start-up of activities described in Appendix B later in 2020, and will facilitate communication between the implementing partners and participating Mongolian agencies.  The TIP Office will also collaborate and coordinate its funding with other U.S. government agencies and State Department bureaus that support related work.

B.  Mongolia intends to make addressing human trafficking a higher priority within its budgetary and resource allocation processes going forward. This would include support for anti-trafficking activities in fulfillment of the CPC Partnership’s objectives and activities as described in Section IV and in Appendix B: S.-Mongolia CPC Partnership Implementation Plan, expanded support for shelters and other direct services for child victims of human trafficking, and the necessary equipment for investigations and victim protection.  In addition, Mongolian agencies and prosecutors participating in the CPC Partnership intend to increase the number of law enforcement, prosecutor, social welfare, mental health, and labor inspection personnel designated to prioritize child trafficking and to work collaboratively on victim-centered investigation and prosecution of child trafficking cases. The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons will work with prosecutors, police, and child protection officers to establish, provide support for, and maintain an operational Multidisciplinary Task Force (MDTF) focused on interagency coordination in the identification and protection of child trafficking victims and the investigation and prosecution of child trafficking crimes.  Participating agencies and prosecutors will also cooperate with the implementing partners to support the objectives and activities.

C.  The Participants concur that the development and implementation of enhanced strategies for addressing child trafficking is intended to be focused in selected districts in Ulaanbaatar, for example, Songinokhairkhan, Bayanzurkh, Chingeltei, Bayangol and Sukhbaatar districts.

III.  CPC Partnership Purpose

The purpose of this CPC Partnership is to strengthen the efforts of the Mongolian government, NGOs, and civil society organizations to effectively prosecute and convict child traffickers, to provide comprehensive, trauma-informed care for child victims of these crimes, and to prevent all forms of child trafficking in Mongolia.

IV.  CPC Partnership Objectives and Activities

Objective 1: Improve interagency coordination and collaboration of child trafficking investigation, prosecution, protection, and prevention efforts by establishing and maintaining an operational MDTF under the National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons.

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants identify the following areas of cooperation and activities:

  1. Participating agencies and the OPG will appoint members who will participate regularly in a MDTF that will meet at least monthly to share information and promote interagency collaboration on anti-trafficking investigation, prosecution, protection, and prevention activities. Members of the MDTF will include, but not be limited to, representatives from:  the OPG; the MOJHA, including the National Forensic Institute (NFI) and the National Police Agency (NPA)’s Organized Crime Group (OCG), Anti-Trafficking Police Unit (ATPU), and Witness and Victim Protection Division (WVPD); the MLSP, including the Family, Child, and Youth Development Agency (FCYDA); the Consular Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA); the General Agency for Specialized Inspection (GASI); the Ministry of Health (MOH); and NGOs.  Relevant ministry leaders and OPG will ensure designated MDTF members have the time and facilities necessary to participate in MDTF meetings.
  2. MDTF members will cooperate and collaborate with an experienced human trafficking multidisciplinary task force operating in the United States (to be identified by the TIP Office) that will provide mentorship on enhanced interagency case coordination and collaboration throughout the identification and protection of child trafficking victims, investigation and prosecution of child trafficking cases, and prevention of child trafficking.
  3. The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons will oversee the MDTF members’ work to formalize its mission and goals and to establish structure and processes necessary for effective operation, including standard operating procedures with defined roles and responsibilities and partnerships.
  4. MDTF members will coordinate to effectively handle child trafficking cases to ensure a multidisciplinary victim-centered approach from case identification to case disposition.
  5. MDTF members will collect and analyze investigation, prosecution and protection case statistics in order to expand and improve its data-driven decision-making capacity.

Objective 2: Improve the quality of victim-centered investigations and prosecutions with the goal of increasing the number of effective prosecutions and convictions of child trafficking cases.

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants identify the following areas of cooperation and activities:

  1. Improve methods for ensuring victim-centered investigations and prosecutions of child trafficking cases through advanced training and technical assistance for investigators and prosecutors, including specialized training in conducting interviews with potential child victims, the use of child-friendly spaces for such interviews, as well as the timely provision of multidisciplinary services and coordination of services through criminal justice proceedings.
  2. Ensure that participating criminal justice and protection agencies dedicate increased personnel and other resources to human trafficking cases, including assigning more investigators to the NPA OCG and ATPU and providing them with the tools (e.g., vehicles, equipment, and supplies) needed for effective investigations; designating at least two prosecutors who will make human trafficking a priority within their caseload; and designating at least two FCYDA social workers who will develop increased expertise in comprehensive services for child trafficking victims and participate in protection activities related to trafficking cases.
  3. Provide specialized training on the detection and investigation of cyber-facilitated human trafficking, including child trafficking, and expand the technical resources dedicated to forensic investigation of phones, computers, and other devices used by traffickers.
  4. Ensure the timely provision of protective services provided by the NPA Witness and Victim Protection Division (including physical safety and psychological assistance) for child victims who may be witnesses in criminal proceedings and coordination of such services with designated FCYDA personnel.
  5. Develop, maintain, and share statistical data on reports of suspected trafficking, investigations, prosecutions, convictions, and sentences in a manner that disaggregates the number of defendants, criminal offense charged, type of exploitation, and age and gender of trafficking victims.

Objective 3: Strengthen Mongolian and civil society capacity to identify victims of child trafficking and to provide comprehensive specialized services to victims of child sex trafficking and forced child labor.

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants identify the following areas of cooperation and activities:

3.1 Increase the capacity of frontline responders, including but not limited to police, social workers, child protection officers, inspectors, medical and mental health professionals, forensics experts, teachers, civil society, and other relevant stakeholders, to identify and refer cases of suspected child trafficking for assessment and specialized care.

3.2 Increase the availability of specialized residential facilities for child victims through increased Mongolian funding for comprehensive services and cooperative agreements between MLSP, FCYDA, and NGOs with expertise in providing care for child trafficking victims.

3.3 Expand the capacity of social workers, forensics and mental health professionals (including psychologists in the NPA Witness and Victim Protection Division) to conduct risk assessments and assess psychological needs, and to provide specialized psychological counseling and emotional support for child victims of sex trafficking and forced labor throughout legal proceedings.

3.4 Develop and strengthen comprehensive services for child trafficking victims that prioritize safety, wellbeing, and best interests of the child, and include case management to ensure provision of medical care, mental health care, shelter, legal assistance, education and/or vocational training, family/community reintegration, and other services described in Appendix A: Definitions.

3.5 Develop and maintain systems for collecting and analyzing data on identified victims of trafficking and services provided, in a manner that disaggregates type of exploitation, and age and gender of trafficking victims.

Objective 4: Increase efforts to prevent child sex trafficking and forced child labor through school, community, and online mechanisms that educate relevant stakeholders of the risks and indicators of child trafficking and increase the capacity of public officials, civil society, and private sector stakeholders to take appropriate action.

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants identify the following areas of cooperation and activities:

4.1 In coordination with the MDTF, NPA police crime prevention unit, and other local stakeholders, including but not limited to local municipal police and Legal Committees on Children’s Rights in Ulaanbaatar, develop and implement innovative strategies on prevention of child trafficking and identification of the indicators of child trafficking and what action to take when a suspected case is identified.

4.2 Train and provide adequate resources for all labor inspectors to recognize and take appropriate action on human trafficking cases, including forced child labor, and pursue amendments to the respective laws to permit unannounced inspections.

4.3 MDTF members work with relevant officials to prosecute traffickers and take timely action to close entertainment establishments, including massage parlors, where child trafficking victims have been exploited.

V.  Departments and Offices Participating in the CPC Partnership

A.  The United States:

Department of State
Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office)

  • The TIP Office leads the United States’ global engagement to combat human trafficking. The Office partners with foreign governments, international organizations, and civil society to develop and implement effective strategies for confronting trafficking in persons, including through targeted foreign assistance implementing the “3P” paradigm: Prosecuting traffickers, Protecting victims, and Preventing human trafficking, along with the fourth “P” – Partnerships – to promote effective collaboration.

Embassy of the United States in Mongolia

  • The United States Embassy in Mongolia is committed to advancing the principles set out in the Declaration on Strategic Partnership between the United States of America and Mongolia, and to creating a more secure, democratic, and prosperous world for the benefit of the American and Mongolian people.

B.  Mongolia:

  • The National Sub-Council on Prevention of and Combat Against Trafficking in Persons Crime (National Sub-Council) is responsible for the implementation of Law on Combating against Trafficking, providing of professional guidance and coordination of prevention activities and operates within the Crime Prevention and Coordination Council (CPCC).1 The National Sub Council is committed to:
    • Coordinate the work of relevant organizations to ensure the implementation of laws and regulations on combating human trafficking, consider and review their activity reports, carry out inspection and submit recommendations.
    • Initiate studies on conditions of human trafficking crimes by professional and research organizations, elaborate proposals on further actions and submit them to the Government for consideration through the Council on Crime Prevention.
    • Identify areas of cooperation with relevant organizations of other countries on combating human trafficking and promote cooperation.
    • Involve citizens, economic entities and organizations in combating human trafficking crimes, promote cooperation with them, provide support for their initiatives and organize crime prevention training and awareness-raising campaign for the public.
    • Elaborate proposals on allocating in the state budget of the funds required for financing the implementation of the legislation and program on combating human trafficking crimes.
    • Organize trainings to increase professional capacity of those working at organizations, charged with combating and preventing human trafficking.
  • The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons is composed of representatives from MOJHA, CPCC, General Intelligence Agency (GIA), PGO, Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET), MFA, MLSP, MOH, MECSS, NPA, CPD, Immigration Agency, General Executive Authority for Court Decision (GEACD), University of Internal Affairs (UIA), General Agency for State Registration (GASR), International Organization for Migration (IOM), Gender Equality Center NGO (GEC), Human Security Policy Studies Center NGO (HSPSC), and ECPAT Mongolia NGO.

VI.  Communications

Communications specified under this CPC Partnership will be in writing and submitted to the Point of Contact (POC) designated by each Participant as indicated below.  Notice of a change in POC should be provided in writing to the other POCs within 30 days of such change.  The POCs will facilitate intra- and interagency communication regarding CPC Partnership activities, monitor progress toward meeting the objectives and completing activities of the CPC Partnership, and assist the National Sub-Council to report annually on progress.

Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons POC:
Name: Jane Nady Sigmon, PhD
Title: Senior Advisor to the Director
Office: Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
Email address: SigmonJN@state.gov
Telephone: +1-202-453-8503

Embassy of the United States in Mongolia POC:
Name: Nomintsetseg Munkhbayar
Title: Political Assistant
Office: Embassy of the United States in Mongolia
Email address: CPCUlaanbaatar@state.gov
Telephone: +976 7007 6224

Ministry of Justice and Home Affairs POC:
Name: Nyamgerel Lkhamtogmid
Title: Chief of Staff of the Crime Prevention and Coordination Council
Office: National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons
Email address: nyamgerel@mojha.gov.mn
Telephone: +976 11 315539

National Police Agency POC:
Name: Batzorig Baatarsuren
Title: Head of the Child Crime Prevention Department
Office: Metropolitan Police Department
Email address: yeszorig@gmail.com
Telephone: +976 9666 3540

National Police Agency POC:
Name: Nyamdavaa Ochir
Title: Chief of the Organized Crime Group and Human Trafficking Investigations Division
Office: Criminal Police Department’s Organized Crime Group and Human Trafficking Investigations Division
Email address: nyamkaa2004@yahoo.com
Telephone: +976 51 264104, +976 88091166

Office of the Prosecutor General POC:
Name: Ariunbold Tsend-Ayush
Title: Acting Assistant Prosecutor General
Office: Office of the Prosecutor General
Email address: arii_prosecutor@yahoo.com
Telephone: +976 99097350

Ministry of Labor and Social Protection POC:
Name: Bayarmaa Narantuya
Title: Head of the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection
Office: Children, Youth, Elders and Family Development Department
Email address: bayarmaa@mlsp.gov.mn
Telephone: +976 51 262617

Family, Child, and Youth Development Agency POC:
Name: Azjargal Jantsandorj
Title:  Senior Protection Officer
Office: Family, Child, and Youth Development Agency
Email address: azjargal.j@fcy.gov.mn
Telephone: +976 51 262209

Ministry of Foreign Affairs POC:
Name: Oyu Vasha
Title: Head of the Human Rights Division
Office: Department of the Law and Treaties
Email address: dep09-9@mfa.gov.mn
Telephone: +976 51 262179

Ministry of Health POC:
Name: Buyanjargal Yadamsuren
Title: Director of the Medical Assistance Department
Office: Ministry of Health
Email address: buyanjargal@moh.gov.mn
Telephone: +976 51 260474

General Agency for Specialized Inspection POC:
Name: Battsengel Batjargal
Title: Senior Labor Inspector
Office: Department of Labor, Social Protection and Special Oversight
Email address: battsengel.b@inspection.gov.mn; btsengel2005@gmail.com
Telephone: +976 51 260147

National Forensic Institute POC:
Name: Enkh-Amgalan Baljinnyam
Title: Head of Monitoring, Assessment and Internal Audit Department
Office: Monitoring, Assessment and Internal Audit Department
Email address: t.nurmaa@nifs.gov.mn
Telephone: +976 51 266342, +976 99157203

Ministry of Education, Culture, Science and Sports POC:
Name: Nyam-Ochir Tumur-Ochir
Title: Director of the Education Policy Department
Office: Ministry of Education, Culture, Science and Sports
Email address: nyamochir@mecs.gov.mn
Telephone: +976 51 262424

VII.  Sustainability

The Participants intend for the policy and operational improvements in Mongolia’s response to child trafficking adopted with the support and during the course of this CPC Partnership to continue after the end of this Partnership. The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons will develop a plan for sustaining such improvements, including any additions to Mongolia’s legal framework that may facilitate continuation of MDTF operations.

VIII.  Marking Progress in Achieving CPC Partnership Objectives

A.  The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons on behalf of the participating Mongolian agencies will provide an annual report to the U.S. Embassy and the TIP Office, including a narrative report describing progress toward meeting the CPC Partnership objectives and completing the activities in the U.S.-Mongolia CPC Partnership Implementation Plan and data for the performance indicators for measuring progress in Appendix C.  The reporting format will be jointly developed by the Participants within six months of the effective date of the CPC Partnership.

B.  The TIP Office will monitor the progress of implementing partners and progress toward meeting the CPC Partnership objectives and completing the activities.

C.  Beginning one year from the start-up of Partnership activities, the Participants and the implementing partners will meet annually to highlight CPC Partnership accomplishments, note challenges, and discuss planned activities for the coming year.

IX.  Modification

This CPC Partnership may be modified or extended in writing with the mutual consent of the Participants.

X. Effective Date and Limitations

This CPC Partnership will become effective on the date of the last signature by the representatives signing for each Participant and remain effective for four years from that date.  The representatives signing for each Participant are jointly signing to acknowledge their individual agency commitments and the collaborative spirit of this Partnership.  This Partnership does not constitute an international agreement and does not create any binding obligations between the Participants under either international or domestic law; activities of each Participant are subject to the availability of appropriated funds.

Signed in Ulaanbaatar in eight originals, four each in the English and Mongolian languages.

For the United States 

_________________________________________
U.S. Ambassador to Mongolia

_________________________________________
Date

 

For Mongolia

_________________________________________
Minister of Justice and Home Affairs

_________________________________________
Date      

_________________________________________
Prosecutor General

_________________________________________
Date 

_________________________________________
Minister for Labor and Social Protection

_________________________________________
Date


Appendix A: Definitions

Definitions for the Purposes of the U.S.-Mongolia Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership

“Trafficking in persons” and “human trafficking” are used as umbrella terms to describe when a trafficker recruits, harbors, transports, provides, or obtains a person for compelled labor or commercial sex acts through the use of force, fraud, or coercion.  This compelled service includes involuntary servitude, slavery or practices similar to slavery, debt bondage, and forced labor.  Human trafficking can include, but does not require, movement from one place to another.  At the heart of this crime is the traffickers’ goal of exploiting and enslaving their victims, and they use myriad coercive and deceptive practices to do so;

“forced child labor” is a form of human trafficking in which a trafficker forces a child to work.  Any person who recruits, harbors, transports, provides or obtains a child for the purpose of forced labor has committed this crime.  Forced child labor includes situations in which the child is in the custody of someone other than an immediate family member who requires the child to perform work that financially benefits that person.  It also includes a situation in which a parent provides a child to another person who subjects the child to forced labor.  Child victims of forced labor do not have the option of leaving the exploitative work situation.  Traffickers who subject children to forced labor usually do not adequately cared for the child, do not allow the child to attend school, and may be physically and emotionally abusive;

“child sex trafficking” is a form of human trafficking that occurs when a trafficker recruits, harbors, transports, provides, advertises, solicits, patronizes, obtains, or maintains a child for the purpose of performing a commercial sex act.  Force, coercion or deception are not required in cases of child sex trafficking.  When traffickers use a live webcam or other device to broadcast over the Internet children performing commercial sex acts or other explicit sexual acts it is a form of sex trafficking often referred to as online sexual exploitation of a child;

“child trafficking” encompasses forced child labor and child sex trafficking; and

“child” is a person under the age of 18.

Victim-centered approach: Placing the crime victim’s priorities, needs, and interests at the center of the work with the victim; providing nonjudgmental assistance, with an emphasis on client self-determination, where appropriate, and assisting victims in making informed choices; ensuring that restoring victims’ feelings of safety and security is a priority and safeguarding against policies and practices that may inadvertently re-traumatize victims; ensuring that victims’ rights, voices, and perspectives are incorporated when developing and implementing system- and community-based efforts that impact crime victims.

Comprehensive services: An array of services that should be made available to a trafficking victim. At a minimum, these services include shelter; intensive case management; safety planning; crisis intervention; victim advocacy; legal assistance; mental health treatment, including individual and group counseling; support in family reunification and community reintegration; medical care; dental care; substance abuse treatment; assistance with educational and/or vocational needs; life skills training; transportation; and other necessary services. These services should be made available for victims identified under this initiative in coordination with other existing governmental resources.

Trauma-informed approach: A trauma-informed approach includes an understanding of the vulnerabilities and experiences of trauma survivors, including the prevalence and the physical, social, and emotional impact of trauma.  This approach recognizes signs of trauma in individuals and the professionals who help them and responds by integrating knowledge about trauma into policies, procedures, practices, and settings.  Trauma-informed approaches place a priority on restoring the survivor’s feelings of safety, choice, and control.  Programs, services, agencies, and communities can be trauma-informed.

Characteristics of Multidisciplinary Task Forces focused on Human Trafficking:

1. Task Forces implement victim-centered, collaborative, and sustainable approaches that will:

  • Ensure identification of victims of all types of human trafficking.
  • Engage in coordinated approaches for proactive victim-centered investigations and effective prosecutions of both sex trafficking and forced labor.
  • Address the individualized needs of trafficking victims through referrals and the provision of a comprehensive array of quality services.

2. Task Force members include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Police agency
  • A designated Prosecutor
  • Social service agencies, including child welfare agency
  • Criminal justice system victim/witness coordinators
  • At least one nongovernmental victim service organization that serves victims of trafficking, including social or legal service providers and those with expertise in serving vulnerable communities, e.g., migrants, runaway and homeless youth
  • Civil labor enforcement agency

3. Task Forces operate and function effectively when the following core elements are regularly maintained and implemented:

  • Partnership and collaboration
  • Data-driven decision-making
  • Leadership and management
  • Active investigations and prosecutions
  • Peer-to-peer mentoring
  • Advanced training

Appendix B: U.S.-Mongolia CPC Partnership Implementation Plan

Objective 1: Improve interagency coordination and collaboration of child trafficking investigation, prosecution, protection, and prevention efforts by establishing and maintaining an operational MDTF under the National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons. 

Target Areas: 

 

Key Activities

Roles and Responsibilities of Mongolia TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partner(s)

1.1 Participating Mongolian agencies will appoint members who will participate regularly on a Multidisciplinary Task Force (MDTF) that will meet at least monthly to share information and promote interagency collaboration on anti-trafficking investigation, prosecution, protection, and prevention activities.  Members of the MDTF will include, but not be limited to, representatives from:  the OPG; MOJHA, including the NFI and the NPA’s OCG, ATPU, and WVPD; the MLSP, including the FCYDA; the Consular Department of the MFA; GASI; the MOH; and NGOs.  Relevant ministry leaders and OPG will ensure designated MDTF members have the time and facilities necessary to participate in MDTF meetings.

 

The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons oversees the overall structure of the MDTF and the development and implementation of operating procedures, including protocols for confidentiality.

Relevant agency and prosecutor leaders designate working/operations-level personnel in leadership roles to serve as MDTF members.

Relevant agency and prosecutor leaders ensure that MDTF members have the time and facilities necessary to participate in MDTF meetings and promote general information-sharing and case collaboration.

Partner works with MDTF members to identify or respond to technical assistance and training needs.

Partner provides coordination support, including logistics and supplies for MDTF meetings.

 

1.2 MDTF members will cooperate and collaborate with an experienced human trafficking multidisciplinary task force operating in the United States (to be identified by the TIP Office) that will provide mentorship on enhanced interagency case coordination and collaboration throughout the identification and protection of child trafficking victims, investigation and prosecution of child trafficking cases, and prevention of child trafficking.

Designated MDTF members regularly participate in MDTF meetings and contribute to the development of the structures needed for an effective MDTF in Mongolia.

Members also participate in at least one international exchange trip in year one of this Partnership to learn about the effective operation of a human trafficking task force in the U.S. and the operation of one-stop assessment centers, such as a U.S. Children’s Advocacy Center.

Designated MDTF members coordinate with TIP Office partner and U.S.-based human trafficking task force on activities related to Task Force operation.

Partner, in collaboration with the TIP Office, will identify an experienced Human Trafficking Task Force and Children’s Advocacy Center operating in the U.S. to provide mentorship for Mongolia’s MDTF.

Partner organizes at least one international exchange trip between task force members in Mongolia and the U.S. for on-site learning and relationship building in year one of the Partnership, by supporting travel logistics, agenda setting, and meeting coordination.

1.3 The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons will oversee the MDTF members’ work to formalize the mission and goals and to establish structure and processes necessary for effective operation, including standard operating procedures with defined roles and responsibilities and partnerships.

 

The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons establishes and sustains an effective leadership structure and operational protocols that ensure broad membership from essential agencies.

National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons designates a MDTF coordinator with sufficient time to serve as a primary point of contact for all MDTF operations.

National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons develops and implements a task force sustainability plan to ensure operation of the MDTF beyond the CPC Partnership.

Partner provides technical assistance in the establishment of the MDTF as needed.

Partner supports MDTF mentorship through video conferences and additional exchange visits during the Partnership.

Partner supports the development of MDTF protocols and sustainability plan in coordination with MDTF members.

1.4 MDTF members will coordinate to effectively handle child trafficking cases to ensure a multidisciplinary victim-centered approach from case identification to case disposition.

MDTF members use developed protocols and strategies to coordinate cases of child trafficking using a multidisciplinary, victim-centered approach.

MDTF members regularly coordinate at monthly meetings, and more frequently as needed, on cases from case identification through case disposition.

Partner works with participating agencies to coordinate investigation, prosecution, and protection activities under the MDTF as needed.

Partner provides specialized training, follow up mentoring, and other support for MDTF members in collaboration with the U.S.-based mentor Task Force.

1.5 MDTF members will collect and analyze investigation, prosecution, and protection case statistics in order to expand and improve its data-driven decision-making capacity.

Establish procedures for collecting, sharing, analyzing, and reporting statistical data.

The MDTF coordinator tracks and reports statistical data related to child trafficking cases.

The National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons monitors, assesses, and reports annually on the effectiveness of MDTF operations and CPC Partnership implementation.

Partner provides technical assistance to the MDTF in the establishment of procedures for collecting, sharing, analyzing, and reporting statistical data.

Partner provides technical assistance to the National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons to develop a plan to assess the effectiveness the MDTF operations and CPC Partnership implementation.

Objective 1 Performance Indicators – see Appendix C

Objective 2: Improve the quality of victim-centered investigations and prosecutions with the goal of increasing the number of effective prosecutions and convictions of child trafficking cases. 

Target Areas: 

 

Key Activities

Roles and Responsibilities of Mongolia TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partner(s)
2.1 Improve methods for ensuring victim-centered investigations and prosecutions of child trafficking cases through advanced training and technical assistance for investigators and prosecutors, including specialized training in conducting interviews with potential child victims, the use of child-friendly spaces for such interviews, as well as the timely provision of multidisciplinary services and coordination of services through criminal justice proceedings.

MDTF members work with the implementing partner to identify appropriate staff for training, designate and use NPA and other government training facilities, provide input for training materials, and integrate specialized training into standard curriculum for relevant professionals.

FCYDA, in collaboration with OPG, NPA, NFI, and MOH, establishes and operates at least one multidisciplinary service center where child trafficking victims are interviewed in a child-friendly space and child victims receive medical and psycho-social care and a medical forensic assessment immediately following their removal from a trafficking situation.  MDTF members contribute to maintenance of the multidisciplinary center.

Representatives of MDTF members contribute to the development of SOPs, participate in training, and implement SOPs in their work.

Partner provides training to MDTF members and other representatives of MDTF ministries,  as appropriate, on topics including advanced investigation and prosecution of child trafficking cases, conducting interviews with potential child victims, use of child friendly spaces, intelligence gathering, surveillance, evidence collection, victim-centered practices during law enforcement operations, coordination of victims services through criminal justice proceedings, and techniques that reduce trauma for child victim/witnesses during trials.

Partner provides technical assistance and furnishings and supplies as needed to support the development of a multidisciplinary child-friendly space for interviewing child victims.

Partner works with MDTF members to promote coordinated, comprehensive care to child trafficking victims.

Partner assesses existing SOPs and, with MDTF members’ input, coordinates development and/or strengthening of SOPs for participating agencies.

Partner trains relevant agencies in SOP implementation.

2.2 Ensure that participating criminal justice and protection agencies dedicate increased personnel and other resources to human trafficking cases, including more investigators to the NPA OCG and ATPU and providing them with the tools resources (e.g., vehicles, equipment, and supplies) needed for effective investigations; designating at least two prosecutors who will make human trafficking a priority within their caseload; and designating at least two FCYDA social workers who will develop increased expertise in comprehensive services for child trafficking victims and participate in protection activities related to trafficking cases.

NPA increases the number of investigators assigned to the OCG and ATPU and provides resources (vehicles, equipment, and supplies) needed for effective investigations.

OPG assigns two prosecutors to lead on human trafficking cases and ensures that trafficking cases are given priority in their caseload.

FCYDA designates two experienced social workers who will participate in training on comprehensive services for child trafficking victims and will lead on the development of services for child trafficking victims.

Partner provides technical assistance to NPA and FCYDA as needed for budget formulation and resource advocacy.

2.3 Provide specialized training on the detection and investigation of cyber-facilitated human trafficking, including child trafficking, and expand the technical resources dedicated to forensic investigation of phones, computers, and other devices used by traffickers.

 

NPA and OPG will identify personnel with responsibility for investigation and prosecution of cybercrimes, with an emphasis on child trafficking crimes, and facilitate in-kind contributions to support such training. OPG and NPA trainers will conduct trainings at least four time annually. TIP Office will work with other State Department bureaus to secure resources to support training, including training of trainers, on cyber-facilitated human trafficking investigation and prosecution, with an emphasis on child trafficking cases.
2.4 Ensure the timely provision of protective services provided by the NPA WVPD (including physical safety and psychological assistance) for child victims who may be witnesses in criminal proceedings and coordination of such services with designated FCYDA personnel.

NPA, WVPD, and the OPG work with partner to assess current practices in prosecutions and court proceedings involving child victims/witnesses and recommend changes that will reduce the trauma for children.

The MDTF develops a plan to ensure each child trafficking victim has access to consistent support through the entirety of the criminal justice process.

 

Partner provides expert consultation to NPA, WVPD, and OPG regarding current best practices and recommends improved policies and practices for prosecutions and court proceedings that reduce the trauma for child victims who serve as witnesses, such as the use of pre-recorded testimony, live video technology, special programs that prepare child witnesses for court, court accompaniment by child advocates, and separate waiting areas.

Partner assists government, as appropriate, to increase the availability of victim services staff (such as providing supplemental staff through partnerships with civil society and/or NPA and FCYDA to increase resources dedicated to these activities).

2.5 Develop, maintain, and share statistical data on reports of suspected trafficking, investigations, prosecutions, convictions, and sentences in a manner that disaggregates the number of defendants, criminal offense charged, type of exploitation, and age and gender of trafficking victims. NPA and the OPG provide information about existing data collection system gaps and works to implement plan to address gaps. Partner works with participating agencies to assess gaps in existing data collection system and creates plan to address gaps as needed.
Objective 2 Performance Indicators – see Appendix C

Objective 3: Strengthen Mongolia and civil society capacity to identify victims of child trafficking and to provide comprehensive specialized services to victims of child sex trafficking and forced child labor. 

Target Areas: 

 

Key Activities

Roles and Responsibilities of Mongolia TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partner(s)
3.1 Increase the capacity of frontline responders, including but not limited to police, social workers, child protection officers, medical and mental health professionals, forensics experts, teachers, civil society, and other relevant stakeholders, to identify and refer cases of suspected victims of child trafficking for assessment and to specialized care.

MLSP, NPA, NFI, FCYDA, MOH, MOE, GASI, and other relevant agencies develop, systematize, and fully implement identification and referral standardized procedures for suspected child trafficking victims.

MLSP, NPA, NFI, FCYDA, MOH, MOE, and other relevant agencies identify appropriate staff for training, designate facilities for use, and provide input for training materials for the identification and referral of child trafficking to specialized care.

 

Partner assesses existing victim identification and referral procedures and identifies gaps in design or implementation that limit effectiveness.

Partner assists participating agencies to develop or strengthen existing identification procedures and referral mechanisms, including for immediate referral of victims to receive comprehensive care.

Partner provides training on victim identification and referral procedures to participating agencies and civil society, assesses effectiveness of this training, works to institutionalize training, and provides follow up support as needed.

3.2 Increase the availability of specialized residential facilities for child victims through increased Mongolian funding for comprehensive services and cooperative agreements between FCYDA and NGOs with expertise in providing care for child trafficking victims.

FCYDA increases funding allocated to existing NGO partnerships to increase the capacity of existing shelters

FCYDA and the National Sub Council for Trafficking in Persons identifies an appropriate existing facility in Ulaanbaatar to serve as a specialized residential shelter for child trafficking victims, and dedicates sufficient resources to an NGO, under a cooperative arrangement, to maintain and operate it.

Partner provides training and technical assistance and other resources, including shelter refurbishments and capacity building of staff on shelter management, service provision, trauma-informed care, and reintegration, to FCYDA and the selected NGO on the operation of a specialized residential shelter.

 

3.3 Expand the capacity of social workers, forensics and mental health professionals (including psychologists in the NPA WVPD) to conduct risk assessment and assess psychological needs and

provide specialized psychological counseling and emotional support for child victims of sex trafficking and forced labor throughout legal proceedings.

 

FCYDA, NFI, and NPA WVPD identify appropriate social workers, forensics and mental health professionals for training, designate facilities for use, provide input for training materials, and institutionalize training content for staff. Partner trains social workers and mental health professionals from FCYDA and its NGO partners, and NPA WVPD on specialized, psychological counseling techniques, such as art therapy, and techniques to provide emotional support for child trafficking victims throughout legal proceedings and provide mentorship after training.
3.4 Develop and strengthen comprehensive services for child trafficking victims that prioritize safety, wellbeing, and best interests of the child, and include case management to ensure provision of medical care, mental health care, shelter, legal assistance, education and/or vocational training, family/community reintegration, and other services described in Appendix B Definitions. MLSP, FCYDA assesses existing services for child trafficking victims, creates a plan for capacity building, and identifies Child Protection Officers for training on case management, trauma-informed care, reintegration, and specialized needs of child trafficking victims. Partner works with FCYDA to assess existing services, create a plan for capacity building, and provide training for designated personnel such as Child Protection Officers and relevant civil society partners on case management, trauma-informed care, reintegration, and specialized needs of child trafficking victims.
3.5 Develop and maintain systems for collecting and analyzing data on identified victims of trafficking and services provided, in a manner that disaggregates type of exploitation, and age and gender of trafficking victims. FCYDA provides information about existing data collection system gaps and works to implement plan to address gaps. Partner works with FCYDA to assess gaps in existing data collection system and creates plan to address gaps as needed.
Objective 3 Performance Indicators – see Appendix C

Objective 4: Increase efforts to prevent child sex trafficking and forced child labor through school, community, and online mechanisms that educate relevant stakeholders of the risks and indicators of child trafficking and increase the capacity of public officials, civil society, and private sector stakeholders to take appropriate action.

Target Areas: 

 

Key Activities

Roles and Responsibilities of Mongolia TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partner(s)

4.1 In coordination with the MDTF,  NPA police crime prevention unit, and other local stakeholders, including but not limited to local municipal police and Legal Committees on Children’s Rights in Ulaanbaatar, develop and implement innovative strategies on prevention of child trafficking and identification of the indicators of child trafficking and what action to take when a suspected case is identified.

 

MDTF members coordinate to conduct greater community outreach in selected districts to parents, children, and community groups on indicators of child trafficking and what action to take when a suspected case of child trafficking is identified.

Relevant agencies expand their use of public television to raise public awareness on child trafficking.

Partner will provide technical assistance to participating agencies on strategies and activities to support greater community education and outreach.

Partner assesses related activities and outreach effectiveness, revises materials as needed, and promotes sustained use of effective outreach model in coordination with the MDTF.

4.2 Train and provide adequate resources for all labor inspectors to recognize and take appropriate action on human trafficking cases, including forced child labor, and pursue amendments to the respective laws to permit unannounced inspections.

 

MLSP and GASI strengthen the capacity of labor inspectors and child rights officers to address forced child labor through specialized training.

MLSP and GASI advocate for authority for and implementation of unannounced inspections.

 

Partner provides technical assistance, as necessary, to the MLSP on potential legal remedies to permit unannounced inspections.

Partner provides training and technical assistance to labor inspectors on identifying and responding to forced child labor after unannounced inspections are authorized.

4.3 MDTF members work with relevant officials to prosecute traffickers and to take timely action to close entertainment establishments, including massage parlors, where child trafficking victims have been exploited. NPA and OPG provide timely information to local authorities to facilitate timely closing of entertainment establishments, including massage parlors, following the removal of child trafficking victims from the premises. Partner provides technical assistance on timely strategies for the closing of entertainment establishments, including massage parlors, where child victims of trafficking were exploited.
Objective 4 Performance Indicators – see Appendix C

Appendix C: U.S.-Mongolia CPC Partnership Performance Indicators for Measuring Annual Progress

Objective 1: Improve interagency coordination and collaboration of child trafficking investigation, prosecution, protection, and prevention efforts by establishing and maintaining an operational MDTF under the National Sub-Council on Trafficking in Persons.

1.2 MDTF develops protocols and strategies for coordinating work on child trafficking cases.

1.3 MDTF collects statistical data that documents the MDTF’s work and compiles and analyzes it annually to ensure data-driven decision-making.

1.4 The National Sub Council on Trafficking in Persons issues an annual report on the effectiveness of MDTF operations and CPC Partnership implementation.

Objective 2: Improve the quality of victim-centered investigations and prosecutions with the goal of increasing the number of effective prosecutions and convictions of child trafficking cases.

2.1 Number of new child sex trafficking and forced child labor investigations opened during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

2.2 Number of new cyber-facilitated child trafficking investigations opened by police during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

2.3 Number of active child sex trafficking and forced child labor investigations during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

2.4 Number of individuals arrested for a child sex trafficking-related or forced child labor-related incident during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

2.5. Number of individuals criminally charged for a child sex trafficking or forced child labor offense during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

2.6. Number of individuals convicted of a child sex trafficking or forced child labor offense during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

2.7 Number of child trafficking victims assisted and protected by the WVPD during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

2.8 At least one multidisciplinary one-stop service center is established and operational.

2.9 Number of additional investigators assigned to the Organized Crime Group and Anti-Trafficking Unit.

2.10 Number of personnel, disaggregated by police, prosecutors, social workers and other relevant positions, working on human trafficking cases coordinated by the MDTF during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

Objective 3: Strengthen Mongolia and civil society capacity to identify victims of child trafficking and to provide comprehensive specialized services to victims of child sex trafficking and forced child labor.

3.1 Standardized procedures for victim identification and referral developed and implemented.

3.2 Number of child trafficking victims who received services coordinated by FCYDA during each 12 months of the CPC implementation.

3.3 Number of resources and services, disaggregated by type of service, provided to child trafficking victims through the support of FCYDA during each 12 months of the CPC implementation.

3.4 Plan for addressing FCYDA’s child trafficking data collection gaps developed.

3.5 Number of newly designated Child Protection Officers providing services to child trafficking victims.

Objective 4: Increase efforts to prevent child sex trafficking and forced child labor through school, community, and online mechanisms that educate relevant stakeholders of the risks and indicators of child trafficking and increase the capacity of public officials, civil society, and private sector stakeholders to take appropriate action.

4.1 Number of districts MDTF engages for community outreach and education activities during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

4.2 Number of child trafficking prevention community activities conducted during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

4.3 Number of public television broadcasts promoting community education on prevention and action related to child trafficking during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

4.4 Procedures for timely closing of entertainment establishments following the removal of child trafficking victims are developed and implemented.

4.5 Number of child trafficking victims identified by labor inspectors during each 12 months of MDTF operation.

_______________________

1 CPCC staff handles all administrative operations for the National Sub-Council.

U.S. Department of State

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