A Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership is a multi-year plan developed jointly by the United States and a particular country that documents the commitment of the two governments to achieve shared objectives aimed at strengthening the country’s efforts to effectively prosecute and convict child traffickers, provide comprehensive trauma-informed care for child victims of these crimes, and prevent child trafficking in all its forms.

The purpose of a CPC Partnership is to work collaboratively with a government through a joint commitment and with assistance that is administered through tailored projects designed to enhance both government and civil society efforts to effectively address the child trafficking problems in the country.

During the course of developing a CPC Partnership, the unique context of the trafficking situation in the country is examined and strategies for addressing child trafficking are discussed with the goal of reaching a shared commitment on elements to be included in the partnership instrument.

The TIP Office selects a country to which it would propose a CPC Partnership based on a review of several factors and in consultation with experts in the Department of State, USAID, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Department of Justice, and other relevant federal agencies, as appropriate.  In making this selection, the TIP Office takes into account the country narrative and country-specific recommendations of the most recent Trafficking in Persons Report, the country’s national action plan to combat human trafficking, and the country’s national child protection strategy, as applicable.

Assistance may be provided through grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts to civil society or international organizations or other entities with expertise in combating human trafficking.

Learn more about the current CPC Partnerships with the following countries:

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