Central African Republic [shutterstock]

Highlights

U.S.-Central African Republic Relations

The U.S. established diplomatic relations with the Central African Republic (C.A.R.) in 1960, following its independence from France. The U.S. and C.A.R. share a vision of a more stable country that enjoys greater stability and security, experiences improved economic growth and development, contributes to regional stability, and is a reliable partner on issues of mutual importance. The U.S. also supports C.A.R.'s efforts to develop strong institutions that will improve transparency through capacity-building, strengthen the rule of law, and promote unity among Central Africans.

U.S. Assistance to Central African Republic

The Central African Republic (C.A.R.) ranks 188 out of 188 countries on the United Nations Human Development Index. Over the past two years, the U.S. has provided over $300 million of humanitarian, development, and security assistance in support of the C.A.R. people’s efforts to find long-term stability and peace. The U.S. has provided assistance to strengthen the UN mission and humanitarian aid to address the continuing humanitarian crisis in C.A.R.

Bilateral Economic Relations

The U.S. and the Central African Republic (C.A.R.) have a small amount of bilateral trade. In 2004, the U.S. removed C.A.R. from the list of countries eligible for preferential trade benefits under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). C.A.R. regained eligibility for benefits under AGOA in 2017.

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