Iceland [Shutterstock]

Highlights

U.S.-Iceland Relations

The U.S. was the first country to recognize Iceland's independence in 1944 following Danish rule, union with Denmark under a common king, and German and British occupation during World War II. Iceland is a founding member of NATO but has no standing military of its own. The U.S. and Iceland signed a bilateral defense agreement in 1951; it remains in force, although U.S. military forces are no longer permanently stationed in Iceland.

U.S. Assistance to Iceland

The 1951 bilateral defense agreement stipulated that the U.S. would make arrangements for Iceland's defense on behalf of NATO and provided for basing rights for U.S. forces in Iceland. In 2006 the U.S. announced it would continue to provide for Iceland's defense but without permanently basing forces in the country. That year, Naval Air Station Keflavik closed, and the two countries signed a technical agreement on base closure issues (e.g., facilities return, environmental cleanup, residual value) and a "joint understanding" on future bilateral security cooperation focusing on defending Iceland and the North Atlantic region against emerging threats such as terrorism and trafficking. The U.S. also worked with local officials to mitigate the impact of job losses at the Air Station, notably by encouraging U.S. investment in industry and tourism development in the Keflavik area. A new Joint Declaration between the U.S. and Iceland was signed in 2016, supplementing the 2006 declaration. Cooperative activities in the context of the agreements have included joint search and rescue, disaster surveillance, and maritime interdiction training with U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard units; and U.S. deployments to support the NATO air surveillance mission in Iceland.

Bilateral Economic Relations

The U.S. seeks to strengthen bilateral economic and trade relations. Most of Iceland's exports go to the European Union and the European Free Trade Association countries, followed by the U.S. and Japan. The U.S. is one of the largest foreign investors in Iceland, primarily in the aluminum sector. The U.S. and Iceland signed a Trade and Investment Framework Agreement in 2009.

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