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Yemen [Shutterstock]

Highlights

U.S. Relationship

U.S.-Yemen Relations

The U.S. maintained a diplomatic presence in Aden as early as the 1880s, but this was primarily for consular purposes relating to American citizen services. U.S. diplomatic representation in North Yemen began in 1959 with a consulate based in Ta’iz focused mainly on economic and humanitarian assistance, and in South Yemen in 1967. Military leaders in North Yemen launched a revolutionary movement on September 26, 1962, which attempted to overthrow the monarchy and establish the Yemen Arab Republic. The United States recognized the new republican government on December 19, 1962. The Yemen Arab Republic (North Yemen) severed relations with the United States on June 7, 1967 in the wake of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Diplomatic relations were reestablished in July 1972 after a visit to Sana’a by U.S. Secretary of State William P. Rogers. The U.S. Embassy in Aden closed when the People’s Republic of Southern Yemen severed diplomatic relations with the United States on October 24, 1969. In 1970, the People’s Republic of Southern Yemen changed its name to the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen and on April 30, 1990, the United States resumed diplomatic relations with the country. Yemeni unification occurred on May 22, 1990. The Yemen Arab Republic and the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen unified under the Republic of Yemen in 1990. In 1994, civil war broke out in Yemen over North-South contentions and the country continues to struggle with issues over unification. After reunification Yemen elected Ali Abdullah Saleh, former president of the Yemen Arab Republic, to lead the country.

U.S. Assistance to Yemen

The ongoing conflict exacerbated already high levels of need in Yemen, pushing the country into a humanitarian crisis. The UN estimates that more than 24 million people, or nearly 80% of the entire population, are in need of humanitarian assistance, more than any other single country today. The U.S. government has provided more than $630 million in humanitarian assistance to Yemen since the beginning of fiscal year 2020. Through USAID and the Bureau for Population Refugees and Migration, the U.S. Government supports interventions including emergency food assistance, medical treatment and vaccination support for children, emergency obstetric services for women, blankets and household goods for displaced families, and hygiene kits and water treatment supplies to reduce the spread of disease. This also includes support for vulnerable refugees and migrants living in Yemen.

U.S. Department of State

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