Deputy Secretary of State John J. Sullivan led a U.S. interagency delegation to participate in the second high-level U.S.-Russia Counterterrorism Dialogue in Vienna, Austria with Russian Deputy Foreign Minister responsible for counterterrorism Oleg Vladimirovich Syromolotov.

Deputy Secretary Sullivan emphasized to Russia that the dialogue must achieve concrete results to benefit U.S. national security and advance mutual interests by enhancing reciprocal information sharing.  The two sides discussed trends in the movements of foreign terrorist fighters (FTFs).  The Deputy Secretary stressed the need for countries of origin to repatriate, rehabilitate, and, as appropriate, prosecute FTFs and accompanying family members.  The United States welcomed Russia’s co-sponsorship of a Global Counterterrorism Forum event on FTF and family repatriation at the upcoming United Nations (UN) General Assembly, together with the United States, Morocco, and North Macedonia.

Deputy Secretary Sullivan recognized Russia’s support of the designation of ISIS-Khorasan at the UN Security Council Resolution 1267 Committee in May, a matter raised by the Deputy Secretary during the first high-level U.S.-Russia high-level Counterterrorism Dialogue in December 2018.  The Deputy Secretary emphasized pursuing further sanctions against ISIS affiliates at the UN, continuing work to cut off the financing of terrorists.  The Deputy Secretary also urged Russia to support U.S. efforts to develop an International Civil Aviation Organization standard on the use of passenger name record information to prevent terrorists from threatening commercial aviation.

Separately, Deputy Secretary Sullivan pressed issues of bilateral concern with Deputy Foreign Minister Syromolotov, including election security and Ukraine.

The United States and Russia agreed to convene the U.S.-Russia Counterterrorism Dialogue at a high-level on an annual basis, and for U.S. and Russian counterterrorism experts to meet in coming months to explore options for further cooperation.

U.S. Department of State

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