U.S. Embassy Canberra, Australia

building

building

Koala with children

Koala with children

American musician visits

American musician visits

Overview

Australia is a vital ally and partner of the United States. The United States and Australia maintain a robust relationship underpinned by shared democratic values, common interests, and cultural affinities. Economic, academic, and people-to-people ties are vibrant and strong. The two countries marked the 75th anniversary of diplomatic relations in 2015.The first American Consul was appointed in 1836 in Sydney. However, the six provinces of Australia remained a united dominion under the United Kingdom from 1901, with the UK in control of the continent’s foreign policy. The United States officially recognized Australia’s independence in 1940 and established a second legation (a diplomatic liaison office) in Canberra. The legation was upgraded to an embassy in 1946 and moved to Canberra.  Today, the United States operates consulates in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth.
Defense ties and cooperation are exceptionally close, and Australian forces have fought together with the United States in every significant conflict since World War I. The U.S.-Australia alliance is an anchor for peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region and around the world. The United States and Australia share an interest in maintaining freedom of navigation and overflight and other lawful uses of the sea, including in the South China Sea. The United States and Australia also work closely in Afghanistan and Iraq, and cooperate closely on efforts to degrade and defeat the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant and address the challenges of foreign terrorist fighters and violent extremism. The United States and Australia attach high priority to controlling and eventually eliminating chemical weapons, other weapons of mass destruction, and anti-personnel landmines. For more information on the ambassador and the U.S. relationship with the country, click here.
 

Source, United States, Department of State, Office of the Historian and Bureau of East Asain and Pacific Affairs