Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons

The Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, headed by Ambassador Susan Coppedge, leads the United States' global engagement against human trafficking, an umbrella term used to describe the activities involved when someone obtains or holds a person in compelled service.

Prosecution
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Protection
Date: 02/17/2000 Description: A child laborer carries cement at a construction site near Dharmsala, India. © AP Image
Prevention
Date: 08/25/2010 Description: Farm workers in California march during a campaign to end human rights violations in the U.S. agricultural industry.  The prevalence of forced labor in agriculture has led to increased pressure on major brands to trace their products to ''the farm gate'' and ensure proper treatment of workers through their supply chains. © Jacque-Jean Tiziou/www.jjtiziou.net

2017 Trafficking in Persons Report

Secretary Tillerson (June 27): "The State Department’s 2017 Trafficking in Persons Report exposes human trafficking networks and holds their operators and their accomplices accountable. The focus of this year’s report is governments’ responsibilities under the Palermo Protocol to criminalize human trafficking in all its forms and to prosecute offenders. We urge the 17 countries that are not a party to the international Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons to reconsider their position and to join the other countries who have made that commitment." Full Text» Report»

 

Ambassador Coppedge (June 27): "The TIP Report is ... a symbol of our moral and legal obligation to combat human trafficking and is in keeping with our country's historical commitment to advancing human dignity and freedom around the world. This year's TIP Report ... emphasizes that governments must do everything in their power to hold traffickers accountable, from passing and enforcing tough anti-trafficking laws to prosecuting complicit officials who betray the public trust and profit from the suffering of others." Full Text» DipNote» Report»


U.S.–Peru CPC Partnership

On June 15, 2017, the United States and Peru signed a Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership, a jointly-developed plan to address and respond to child trafficking in Peru. The U.S. Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office) facilitates a planned TIP Office investment of $5 million in U.S. foreign assistance to one or more organizations to support implementation of the CPC Partnership over a 24-44 month period of time. Click here for more information on the U.S.-Peru CPC Partnership and how to submit a proposal.  Read the press release here. More»


The TIP Office’s 2017-2018 Leahy Vetting Tutorial for Grantees

The TIP Office created an introductory video tutorial to educate grantees on Leahy Vetting, their roles and responsibilities throughout the vetting process, how to overcome challenges, and potential consequences for failing to fulfill their vetting obligation. This video is mandatory viewing for all recipients of TIP Office funding. Total running time 13:15. Learn more about the International Grants Programs»
 


U.S.-Philippines Child Protection (CPC) Partnership Notice of Funding Opportunity and Request for Proposals

On April 11, 2017, the United States and the Philippines signed a CPC Partnership, a jointly-developed plan to address and respond to online sexual exploitation of children and child labor trafficking in the Philippines. The TIP Office intends to provide $3.5 million in U.S. foreign assistance to one or more organizations to support implementation of the CPC Partnership over a 24-42 month period of time. Click here for more information on the U.S.-Philippines CPC Partnership and how to submit a proposal. More»
 


Program to End Modern Slavery

In 2017, the Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons introduced the Program to End Modern Slavery (PEMS), a new initiative focused on advancing transformational programs and projects that seek to achieve a measurable and substantial reduction of the prevalence of modern slavery in targeted populations in priority countries or jurisdictions. More»
 


National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

Date: 11/22/2014 Description: Thai and Burmese fishing boat workers sit behind bars inside a cell at the compound of a fishing company in Benjina, Indonesia. © AP Image January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. Each year during this month, people and organizations around the nation recommit to assisting victims of human trafficking and to combating it in all its forms. The Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons leads the United States' global engagement against human trafficking and supports the coordination of anti-trafficking efforts across the U.S. government. These efforts include forging partnerships with foreign governments, international organizations, civil society, and the private sector to develop and implement effective strategies for confronting modern slavery. DipNote»