Child Protection Compact Partnership Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines

Office To Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
April 11, 2017

   

The Government of the United States of America (“the United States”) and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (“the Philippines”), hereinafter the “Participants,”

Acknowledging the respective leadership roles and responsibilities of the United States Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office) and the Philippines Department of Justice and the agencies of the Philippines Inter-Agency Council Against Trafficking (IACAT), in the fight against human trafficking;

Reflecting on our shared concern about the harmful and lasting impact of human trafficking on young Philippine victims and our interest in partnering to improve efforts to prevent children from becoming exploited in domestic servitude or other forms of child labor trafficking;

Concerned about increasing reports of online sexual exploitation of Philippine children who are induced to perform sex acts for live internet broadcast to paying customers; the lasting psychological, physical, and developmental consequences for child victims; and the need for a concerted and well-coordinated response;

Recognizing existing and ongoing cooperation between the United States and the Philippines on matters related to child trafficking, including United States Agency for International Development (USAID) programs to strengthen community and government responses to child trafficking, United States Department of Labor programs to address child labor, and United States law enforcement efforts focused on collaboration on cases involving online sexual exploitation of children; and

Desiring to conclude this Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership, together with Appendix A (Definitions) and Appendix B (U.S.-Philippines CPC Partnership Implementation Plan), to build on the strong foundation of the Philippine government’s anti-trafficking efforts to achieve improved, sustainable policies and practices to hold perpetrators of child trafficking criminally accountable, identify child victims of trafficking in persons, coordinate the provision of comprehensive protective services, and prevent child trafficking from occurring in the Philippines;

Have reached the following understandings:

I. Context for a potential partnership on child trafficking

A. While the Philippines has successfully investigated and prosecuted several cases of online sexual exploitation of children (OSEC), many local government officials and community leaders, including Barangay Councils for the Protection of Children, have not received training on the indicators of OSEC and child labor trafficking (CLT), or on what action to take when cases are suspected or identified. Very few victims of CLT have been identified and assisted and few cases of CLT have been investigated and prosecuted.

B. More specialized trauma-informed care services are needed for child victims of OSEC.

C. Reports of OSEC are increasing and additional resources are needed for effective investigations and prosecutions of OSEC cases, including specially trained designated personnel, child forensic interviewers, computer equipment, high-speed internet, and logistical support.

D. Greater interagency/multidisciplinary coordination of efforts is needed to detect, investigate, and prosecute OSEC cases and to provide comprehensive protection services.

II. Benefits and Commitments of a CPC Partnership between the United States and the Philippines

This CPC Partnership between the United States and the Philippines is a jointly developed and jointly implemented four-year plan intended to strengthen the capacity of the Philippine government and civil society to address OSEC and CLT in the Philippines and thereby strengthen existing efforts to eradicate these crimes. With the signing of this CPC Partnership, the Participants commit to the following:

A. In support of this CPC Partnership the TIP Office intends to provide up to $3.5 million in U.S. foreign assistance to nongovernmental and/or international organizations to support implementation of elements of the plan’s objectives and activities as described in Section IV and Appendix B, the U.S.-Philippines CPC Partnership Implementation Plan. Of this assistance, up to $3 million will be used to support capacity-building related to improving the Philippines’ response to OSEC; and up to $500,000 will be used to support activities related to improving the Philippines’ response to CLT. The TIP Office intends to select implementing partners through a competitive grant process after the signing of the CPC Partnership and to facilitate communication between implementing partners and participating Philippine agencies.

B. In support of this CPC Partnership, the IACAT intends to provide PhP 40 million (approximately PhP 10 million per year), of which at least PhP 25 million will be used to support activities related to improving the Philippines’ response to CLT; and approximately PhP 15 million will be used to support activities related to improving the response to OSEC. In addition, the Philippine agencies participating in the CPC Partnership intend to commit additional personnel and other resources toward fulfillment of the CPC Partnership’s objectives and activities as described in Section IV and Appendix B, the U.S.-Philippines CPC Partnership Implementation Plan.

C. The Participants concur that the development and implementation of enhanced strategies for addressing OSEC and CLT should be piloted in two regions: the National Capital Region (NCR) and Central Visayas (Region 7).

III. CPC Partnership Purpose

The purpose of this CPC Partnership is to improve the capacity of the Philippines and civil society to prosecute and convict child traffickers, to provide comprehensive, trauma-informed care for child victims of these crimes, and to prevent OSEC and CLT from occurring.

IV. CPC Partnership Objectives and Activities

Objective 1: Increase the number of victim-centered investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of OSEC and CLT cases

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants identify the following areas of cooperation and activities:

1.1 Strengthen the effectiveness of national, regional, and other operational task forces comprised of multidisciplinary teams to review and coordinate the victim-centered investigation and prosecution of OSEC cases, plan for victim safety and care, and build cases for prosecution.

1.2 Coordinate with existing resources and donors to expand the availability of child-friendly spaces where child victims of trafficking can receive medical and psychological care immediately following removal from sexual exploitation and be interviewed by trained forensic interviewers.

1.3 Provide specialized training for designated child forensic interviewers on OSEC cases.

1.4 Building on existing efforts, develop and/or strengthen and implement inter- and intra-agency Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for effective and appropriate handling of OSEC and CLT cases from detection through prosecution.

1.5 Coordinate with existing resources and donors to provide training for prosecutors, law enforcement, social workers, psychologists, and labor inspectors on key issues in effective handling of OSEC cases from detection through prosecution, including the presentation of evidence that does not rely on victim testimony.

1.6 Strengthen systems to collect and report relevant investigation, prosecution, and conviction data, including disaggregation by age, gender, and type of trafficking, for OSEC and CLT cases.

Objective 2: Strengthen government and civil society capacity to identify and provide comprehensive services for victims of OSEC and CLT, including both girls and boys, sibling groups, persons with disabilities (PWD), and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children, from identification through protective care, community reintegration, and long-term follow up services

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants identify the following areas of cooperation and activities:

2.1 Build the capacity of local social workers to identify children in OSEC and CLT, including domestic servitude, take appropriate action, and facilitate the reintegration of child victims of trafficking into their communities.

2.2 Provide specialized comprehensive services to victims of OSEC.

2.3 Expand the availability of psychosocial care practitioners with specialized training in trauma to provide counseling to child victims of OSEC and CLT.

2.4 Strengthen systems to collect and report relevant child trafficking case management data, including disaggregation by age, gender, and type of trafficking, for OSEC and CLT cases.

Objective 3: Strengthen existing community-based mechanisms for identifying and protecting child victims of OSEC and CLT, including domestic servitude, and preventing these crimes

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants identify the following areas of cooperation and activities:

3.1 Conduct barangay-level research on the nature and prevalence of OSEC and CLT in selected area(s) that builds upon existing data and research.

3.2 Build capacity of selected Barangay Councils for the Protection of Children (BCPC) and Local Council Against Trafficking-Violence Against Women and Children (LCAT-VAWC) Desk Officers, to identify children in OSEC and CLT, including domestic servitude; take appropriate action once cases are identified; and facilitate the reintegration of child victims of trafficking into their communities.

3.3 Develop and implement community education programs in selected barangays focused on child protection and child trafficking prevention, with special attention to OSEC and CLT.

3.4 Strengthen systems to collect and report BCPC and municipal child trafficking data, including disaggregation by age, gender, and type of trafficking, for OSEC and CLT cases.

V. Departments and Offices Participating in the CPC Partnership

A. The Government of the United States:

Department of State

Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office)

• The TIP Office leads the United States’ global engagement to combat human trafficking. The Office partners with foreign governments, international organizations, and civil society to develop and implement effective strategies for confronting trafficking in persons, including through targeted foreign assistance implementing the “3P” paradigm: prosecuting traffickers, protecting victims, and preventing trafficking.

B. The Government of the Philippines:

Inter-Agency Council Against Trafficking (IACAT)

• The IACAT is composed of the Secretaries of the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), chair and co-chair, respectively, and the heads of the Department of Foreign Affairs, Department of Labour and Employment, Philippine Overseas and Employment Administration, Bureau of Immigration, Philippine National Police, Philippine Commission on Women, Department of the Interior and Local Government, Philippine Center On Transnational Crime, Commission on Filipinos Overseas, and three representatives from non-government organizations representing women, children, and overseas Filipino workers, as members.

Roles and responsibilities of selected Philippine government agencies in the prevention and suppression of trafficking in persons and the protection and assistance of victims of trafficking in persons are as follows:

Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA)

• Make available its resources and facilities for trafficked persons regardless of their manner of entry to the receiving country.

• Explore means to further enhance its assistance in eliminating trafficking activities through closer networking with government agencies in the country and overseas.

• Provide Filipino victims of trafficking overseas with free legal assistance and counsel to pursue legal action against his/her traffickers, who shall represent his or her interests in any criminal investigation or prosecution.

• Assist in the application for social benefits and/or regular immigration status as may be allowed or provided for by the host country.

• Repatriate trafficked persons.

• Take necessary measures for the efficient implementation of the e-passporting system.

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)

• Implement rehabilitative and protective programs for trafficked persons.

• Provide counseling and temporary shelter to trafficked persons.

• Develop a system for accreditation among NGOs for purposes of establishing centers and programs for intervention in various levels of the community.

• Establish free temporary shelters for the protection and housing of trafficked persons for the provision of the following basic services: a) psychological support and counseling; b) 24-hour Action Line for crisis calls and technology-based counseling and referral system; c) coordination with local law enforcement entities; and d) coordination with the DOJ, among others.

• Conduct information campaigns in communities and schools teaching parents and families that receiving consideration in exchange for adoption is punishable by law.

• Together with the Philippine National Police (PNP) and other relevant agencies, conduct information campaigns for the general public that they must not induce poor women to give their children up for adoption in exchange for consideration.

Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE)

• Ensure strict implementation and compliance with the rules and guidelines relative to the employment of persons locally and overseas.

• Monitor, document, and report cases of trafficking in persons involving employers and labor recruiters locally and overseas.

• To provide employment facilitation and livelihood opportunities to trafficked victims/survivors.

• In coordination with DFA, provide free temporary shelters and other services to Filipino victims of trafficking overseas through the MWOFRC established under RA No. 8042, as amended.

Department of Justice (DOJ)

• Ensure the prosecution of persons accused of trafficking.

• Designate and train special prosecutors who shall handle and prosecute cases of trafficking.

• Establish a mechanism for free legal assistance for trafficked persons, in coordination with the DSWD, Integrated Bar of the Philippines (IBP) and other NGOs and volunteer groups.

• Provide witness protection to trafficked victims and their families.

• Receive, evaluate, process, and investigate claims for compensation by trafficked victims, when applicable, pursuant to Republic Act No. 7309 (Victims Compensation Act).

• Conduct training and continuing education program on investigation and prosecution for trafficking in persons and other related offenses for prosecutors and law enforcement officers.

• Review and recommend policies and measures to enhance protection against trafficking in persons.

• Recommend the negotiation of mutual legal assistance and extradition treaties with other countries in coordination with the DFA.

• Coordinate with and/or provide assistance to the Anti-Money Laundering Council (AMLC) on cases of trafficking in persons with possible money laundering underpinnings.

Bureau of Immigration (BI)

• Strictly administer and enforce immigration and alien administration laws.

• Adopt measures for the apprehension of suspected traffickers both at the place of arrival and departure.

• Ensure compliance by the Filipino fiancés/fiancées and spouses of foreign nationals with the guidance and counseling requirement.

Philippine National Police (PNP)

• Undertake surveillance, investigation, and arrest of individuals or persons suspected to be engaged in trafficking.

• Closely coordinate with other law enforcement agencies to secure concerted efforts for effective investigation and apprehension of suspected traffickers.

• Coordinate with other government agencies which may have initially processed complaints for trafficking in persons.

• Conduct monitoring, surveillance, and investigation of alleged trafficking activities in different airports and seaports through its aviation security group and maritime group.

• Establish a system to receive complaints and calls to assist trafficked persons and conduct rescue operations.

• Ensure that deployed personnel to the office of the police attaché are capable of investigating trafficking cases in a child and gender sensitive manner.

• Establish an anti-trafficking section under the Women and Children Protection Desks nationwide.

• Integrate in the program of instruction a comprehensive child and gender sensitive management of trafficking cases in the PNP training school and other schools operated and managed by the PNP.

• Provide capacity building to the senior cadets of the Philippine National Police Academy in coordination with IACAT.

National Bureau of Investigation (NBI)

• Undertake surveillance, investigation, and arrest of individuals or persons suspected to be engaged in trafficking.

• Closely coordinate with other law enforcement agencies to secure concerted efforts for effective investigation and apprehension of suspected traffickers.

• Establish a system to receive complaints and calls to assist trafficked persons and conduct rescue operations.

Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG)

• Institute a systematic information and prevention campaign in coordination with pertinent agencies of government.

• Provide training programs to local government units in coordination with IACAT.

VI. Communications

Communications required under this CPC Partnership will be in writing and submitted to the Point of Contact (POC) designated by each Participant as indicated below. Notice of a change in POC should be provided in writing to the other POCs within 30 days of such change. The POCs will facilitate intra- and interagency communication regarding CPC Partnership activities, including semi-annual reporting to the IACAT of progress toward meeting objectives and completing activities of the CPC Partnership.

Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons POC:
Name: Jane Nady Sigmon, PhD
Title: Senior Advisor to the Director
Office: Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
Email address: sigmonjn@state.gov
Telephone: +1-202-312-9887

Department of Justice POC:
Name: Attorney Erickson H. Balmes
Title:. Undersecretary-In-Charge, IACAT
Office: Department of Justice
Email address: balmz@yahoo.com
Telephone: +63 920-912-1480

Inter-Agency Council Against Trafficking POC:
Name: Prosecutor Darlene R. Pajarito
Title: Executive Director
Office: Department of Justice
Email address: darlene.pajarito@iacat.net
Telephone: +63 927-432-6615

Department of Social Welfare and Development POC:
Name: Hope V. Hervilla
Title: OIC-Undersecretary
Office: Operations and Program Group – Protective Programs
Email address: hvhervilla@dswd.gov.ph
Telephone: +63 2 931-8101

Name: Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan
Title: Director and Officer in-Charge
Office: Protective Services Bureau
Email address: asbonoan@dswd.gov.ph
Telephone: + 63 2 931-8101

Department of the Interior and Local Government, National Barangay Operations Office POC:
Name: Myrna Santos
Title: Assistant Division Chief
Office: Community Capacity Development Division - National Barangay Operations Office
Email address: NBOOCCDD@gmail.com
Email address: myrnavinluansantos@yahoo.com
Telephone: +63 2 925-1129

National Bureau of Investigation POC:
Name: Attorney Janet Francisco
Title: Chief
Office: Anti-Human Trafficking Division
Email address: jam_f72@yahoo.com
Telephone: +63 917-717-2076

Philippines National Police POC:
Name: PSSupt. Liborio P. Carabbacan
Title: Acting Chief
Office: Women and Children’s Protection Centers (WCPC)
Email address: lyecarabbacan@yahoo.com
Telephone: +63 2 411-0441

Name: Supt. Villamor Q. Tuliao
Title: Director
Office: Anti-Trafficking in Persons Division, WCPC
Email address: villamor.tuliao@didm.gov.ph
Email address: wcpc_pnp@yahoo.com
Telephone: +63 915 867-4777

Department of Labor and Employment POC:
Name: Joel Maglungsod
Title: Undersecretary
Office: Labor Relations and Special Concerns
Email address: useclr@dole.gov.ph
Telephone: +63 2 527-3000 loc. 708

Name: Ahmma Charisma Lobrin-Satumba
Title: Director
Office: Bureau of Workers with Special Concerns (BWSC)
Email address: cha_lobrin_satumba@yahoo.com
Email address: bwywdole@yahoo.com
Telephone: +63 2 404 3336

Department of Foreign Affairs POC:
Name: Attorney Raul Dado
Title: Executive Director
Office: Office of Migrant Affairs
Email address: mojicans87@gmail.com
Telephone: +63 2 834 4685

VII. Effective Date and Limitations

This CPC Partnership will become effective on the date of its signature by both Participants and to remain effective for four years from that date. This Partnership does not constitute an international agreement and does not create any binding obligations between the Participants under either international or domestic law; activities of each participant are subject to the availability of appropriated funds.

VIII. Modification

This CPC Partnership may be modified or extended in writing with the mutual consent of the Participants.

IX. Sustainability

The Participants intend for the policy and operational improvements in the Philippines' response to OSEC and CLT adopted with the support, and during the course, of this CPC Partnership to continue after the end of this arrangement. The IACAT will develop a plan for sustaining such improvements within two years of the effective date of this Partnership.

X. Reporting Progress and Evaluating Impact of the CPC Partnership

A. The IACAT will provide semi-annual reports to the TIP Office describing progress toward meeting the CPC Partnership objectives and completing the activities, including quantitative and qualitative data corresponding to the associated performance indicators, as shown in Appendix B, the U.S.-Philippines CPC Partnership Implementation Plan.

B. The TIP Office will monitor the progress of implementing partners and progress toward meeting the CPC Partnership objectives and completing the activities. The TIP Office will also support an evaluation of the overall impact of this Partnership.

Signed in Manila, in two originals, in the English language.

For the Government of
the United States of America

 

_________________________________
Date

For the Government of
the Republic of the Philippines

 

_________________________________
Date

 


Appendix A: Definitions

Definitions for the Purposes of the

U.S.-Philippines Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership

“Trafficking in persons” and “human trafficking” are used as umbrella terms for the act of recruiting, harboring, transporting, providing, or obtaining a person for compelled labor or commercial sex acts through the use of force, fraud, or coercion. This compelled service includes involuntary servitude, slavery or practices similar to slavery, debt bondage, and forced labor. Human trafficking can include, but does not require, movement. People may be considered trafficking victims regardless of whether they were born into a state of servitude, were transported to the exploitative situation, previously consented to work for a trafficker, or participated in a crime as a direct result of being trafficked. At the heart of this phenomenon is the traffickers’ goal of exploiting and enslaving their victims and the myriad coercive and deceptive practices they use to do so;

“child labor trafficking,” also referred to as forced child labor, is a form of trafficking in persons the purpose of which is to subject children to forced labor. Any person who engages in recruiting, harboring, transporting, providing or obtaining a child for the purpose of forced labor has committed this crime. Child labor trafficking includes situations in which the child is in the custody of someone other than an immediate family member who requires the child to perform work that financially benefits that person, as well as situations in which a parent provides a child to others who subject the child to forced labor in which the child does not have the option of leaving the employment. Children subjected to forced labor are usually inadequately cared for and not allowed to attend school and are often abused;

“child sex trafficking” is a form of trafficking in persons and occurs when a child is recruited, harbored, transported, provided, solicited, patronized, obtained, or maintained for the purpose of performing a commercial sex act from which the trafficker benefits financially. When the abuse or exploitation is performed through the use of live webcam and children are induced to perform commercial sex acts or other explicit sexual acts that are then broadcasted over the Internet, it is considered as online sexual exploitation of children. Children who are prostituted or are victims of online sexual exploitation are sex trafficking victims, without regard to whether force is used to make them engage in commercial sex; and

“child trafficking” encompasses child labor trafficking and child sex trafficking; and

“child” is a person under the age of 18.

In Philippine law,

“child pornography” refers to any representation, whether visual, audio, or written combination thereof, by electronic, mechanical, digital, optical, magnetic or any other means, of child engaged or involved in real or simulated explicit sexual activities. (Sec. 3 (b), of R.A. No. 9775)

“explicit sexual activity” includes actual or simulated -

(1) Sexual intercourse or lascivious act including, but not limited to, contact involving genital to genital, oral to genital, anal to genital, or oral to anal, whether between persons of the same or opposite sex;

(2) bestiality;

(3) masturbation;

(4) sadistic or masochistic abuse;

(5) lascivious exhibition of the genitals, buttocks, breasts, pubic area and/or anus; or

(6) use of any object or instrument for lascivious acts. (Sec. 3 (c), of R.A. No. 9775)


Appendix B: U.S.-Philippines CPC Partnership Implementation Plan

Objective 1: Increase the number of successful victim-centered investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of OSEC and CLT cases

Target Regions: National Capital Region and Central Visayas (Region 7)

Key Activities in Selected Regions:

Roles and Responsibilities of Philippine Government Agencies

TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partner(s)

1.1 Strengthen effectiveness of national, regional, and other operational task forces, comprised of a multidisciplinary team (e.g., PNP, NBI, NPS, DSWD, DOLE, CPUs, V/W Coordinators) to review and coordinate the victim-centered investigation and prosecution of OSEC cases, plan for victim safety and care, and build cases for prosecution

1.1a. IACAT oversees the overall structure of task forces

1.1b. DOJ, DSWD, NPS, DILG, PNP, NBI, CPUs, LGU and DOLE participate in task forces, designate sufficient personnel for training and operations, and maintain trained personnel for at least two years

1.1c. Designated task force chair from DOJ or DSWD leads coordination of each task force and coordinates with the IACAT and/or Interagency Council Against Child Pornography (IACACP), as appropriate

1.1d. Each agency tracks and reports relevant data related to cases

1. Partner assesses effectiveness of task forces in reviewing and coordinating on cases, identifies technical assistance and training needs, and coordinates support, including logistics and equipment, for participating task force members

Partner works with participating agencies to coordinate with related activities supported by other donors

Partner coordinates activities with the IACACP

Partner coordinates activities with Philippine-based U.S. law enforcement components responsible for investigating OSEC cases

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.1a. Agencies designate and maintain sufficient trained personnel for operations and effectively coordinate on OSEC cases

1.1b. Increased number of successful victim-centered investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of OSEC cases

1.2 Coordinate with existing resources and donors to expand the availability of child-friendly spaces where child victims of trafficking can receive medical and psychological care immediately following removal from sexual exploitation and be interviewed by trained forensic interviewers

1.2 IACAT Secretariat, DSWD, PNP and NBI work cooperatively to assess existing resources and gaps in availability of child-friendly spaces in program regions and ensure spaces are safe, utilized effectively, and are maintained for sustained use

1.2 Partner works with IACAT Secretariat, DSWD, PNP and NBI to assess gaps in availability of child-friendly safe spaces in the program regions, and coordinates support with other donors for strengthening of child-friendly spaces, including providing technical advice and necessary furnishings and equipment

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.2a Increased number of child-friendly spaces are used appropriately

1.2b Child-friendly spaces are used in an increased number of cases of child trafficking

1.3 Provide specialized training for designated child forensic interviewers on OSEC cases

1.3 Participating agencies (IACAT Secretariat, DOJ-OOC, NBI, PNP, DSWD, CPUs) designate staff for training and provide input into training curriculum design; assess whether trained staff have the appropriate skills to conduct interviews; provide implementing partner with information about additional training or mentoring for staff as needed; ensure that specially trained personnel are designated and participate in OSEC operations; integrate specialized training into standard curriculum for child forensic interviewers

1.3 Partner will provide specialized training and follow up mentoring for each agency

Partner coordinates training activities with Philippine-based U.S. law enforcement components responsible for investigating OSEC cases

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.3a. An increased number of skilled child forensic interviewers conduct interviews of child victims in OSEC cases

1.3b. An increased number of OSEC victims are interviewed by trained child forensic interviewers

1.4 Building on existing efforts, develop and/or strengthen and implement inter- and intra-agency Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for effective handling of OSEC and CLT cases from detection through prosecution

1.4 Participating IACAT agencies (IACAT Secretariat, NPS, PNP, NBI, DSWD, DOLE, LGU) provide information about existing SOPs and input for developing and/or strengthening SOPs, and implement finalized SOPs

DOJ issues directives to clarify priority for expedited handling of child trafficking cases

1.4a.Partner assesses existing SOPs and, with agency input, coordinates development and/or strengthening of SOPs for participating agencies

1.4b. Partner trains relevant agencies in SOP implementation

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.4 All participating agencies effectively utilize SOPs for OSEC and CLT cases

1.5 Coordinate with existing resources and donors to provide training for prosecutors, law enforcement, social workers, psychologists, and labor inspectors on key issues in effective handling of OSEC cases from detection through prosecution

1.5 Participating IACAT agencies (IACAT Secretariat, DOJ-OOC, NPS, PNP, NBI, DSWD, DOLE) designate staff for training (including victim witness coordinators) and provide input into training curriculum design; assess whether trained staff have the appropriate skills to effectively handle OSEC cases; and provide implementing partner with information about additional training or mentoring for staff as needed; integrate specialized training into agency’s training academy curricula

1.5 Partner will provide training and follow-up mentoring for each participating agency

Partner coordinates activities with Philippine-based U.S. law enforcement components responsible for investigating OSEC cases

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.5a. An increased number/percentage of OSEC cases are effectively and appropriately handled by prosecutors, law enforcement, social workers and psychologists

1.5b. Digital and other evidence that does not rely on victim testimony in OSEC cases is presented effectively in an increased number of OSEC criminal prosecutions

1.5c Specialized training in OSEC cases is integrated into each agency’s training academy curricula

1.6 Strengthen systems to collect and report relevant investigation, prosecution, and conviction data, including disaggregation by age, gender, and type of trafficking

1.6 Participating agencies (IACAT Secretariat, PNP, NBI, NPS, DOLE, LGU) provide information about existing data collection systems and gaps and help implement plan to address gaps

1.6 Partner assesses gaps in existing data collection system and creates plan to address gaps

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.6 Data on an increased number of relevant cases – including investigation, prosecution, and conviction data on OSEC and child labor trafficking cases, disaggregated by age, gender, and type of trafficking – is collected, maintained, and analyzed


Objective 2: Strengthen government and civil society capacity to identify and provide comprehensive services for victims of OSEC and CLT, including both girls and boys, sibling groups, PWD, and LGBT children, from identification through protective care, community reintegration, and long-term follow up services


Target Regions: National Capital Region and Central Visayas (Region 7)

Key Activities in Selected Regions:

Roles and Responsibilities of Philippine Government Agencies

TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partner(s)

2.1 Build the capacity of local social workers to identify children in OSEC and CLT, including domestic servitude, take appropriate action, and facilitate the reintegration of child victims of trafficking into their communities

2.1 DSWD, in cooperation with LGUs and building on similarly focused activities, works with partner to design and implement plan for capacity building of local social welfare and development officers

2.1 Partner assists participating agencies to design and implement plan for capacity building of local social workers

Associated Indicators:

2.1a Local social workers identify an increased number of children in OSEC and CLT

2.1b Local social workers take appropriate action in response to an increased number of identified cases, including referring cases as needed

2.1c Local social workers facilitate the reintegration of an increased number of children who have received outside treatment services back into their communities

2.2 Provide specialized comprehensive services to victims of OSEC

2.2 DSWD works with partner to design and implement plan for capacity building, and dedicates an increased number of specially trained personnel and other resources for services to victims of OSEC

2.2 Partner works with DSWD to assess existing services, create a plan for capacity building to treat all OSEC victims, and provide training for designated personnel

Associated Indicators:

2.2 Specialized comprehensive care is available for an increased number of victims of OSEC

2.3 Expand the availability of psychosocial care practitioners with specialized training in trauma to provide counseling to child victims of OSEC and CLT

2.3 DSWD designates staff and private practitioners for training and provides input into training curriculum design; assesses whether trained staff have the appropriate skills to provide counseling to victims; and provides implementing partner with requests for additional training or mentoring for staff, as needed

2.3 Partner assists in the selection and orientation of DSWD staff and practitioners for training; provides initial training and follow-up mentoring to DSWD training staff as they take over the training of new psychosocial care practitioners

Associated Indicators:

2.3a An increased number of psychosocial care practitioners receive specialized training in trauma

2.3b An increased number of child victims of OSEC and CLT receive counseling from trauma-trained psychosocial care practitioners

2.4 Strengthen systems to collect and report relevant child trafficking case management data, including disaggregation by age, gender, and type of trafficking

2.4 DSWD and DILG provide information about existing data collection system gaps and works to implement plan to address gaps

2.4 Partner assesses gaps in existing data collection system and works with DSWD and DILG to create plan to address gaps

Associated Indicators:

2.4a Case management data on an increased number of relevant cases – disaggregated by age, gender, and type of trafficking – is collected and maintained at each level of government

2.4b Case management data is analyzed and used to monitor and improve program design and implementation

Objective 3: Strengthen existing community-based mechanisms for identifying and protecting child victims of OSEC and CLT, including domestic servitude, and preventing these crimes

Target Regions: National Capital Region and Central Visayas (Region 7)

Key Activities in Selected Regions:

Roles and Responsibilities of Philippine Government Agencies

TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partner(s)

3.1 Conduct barangay-level research on the nature and prevalence of OSEC and CLT in selected area(s) that builds upon existing data and research

3.1 All participating agencies provide information to support research, facilitate dissemination of research findings, and take steps to integrate relevant findings into project activities

3.1 Partner conducts research, produces reports and publications on OSEC and CLT, and works with agencies on dissemination of findings

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.1a. New research on the nature and prevalence of OSEC and CLT is produced and disseminated to inform agencies and the public

3.1b. Findings from the new research informs project activities in year 2 and onward

3.2 Build capacity of selected Barangay Councils for the Protection of Children (BCPC) and LCAT-VAWC Desk Officers to: 1. Identify children in OSEC and CLT, including domestic servitude; 2. Take appropriate action once cases are identified; and 3. Facilitate the reintegration of child victims of trafficking into their communities

3.2 DILG, in coordination with DSWD and DOLE, works with partner to design and implement plan for capacity building of selected BCPCs and LCAT-VAWC Desk Officers, and dedicates increased resources to address OSEC and CLT cases

3.2 Partner assists DILG to design and implement plan for capacity building of BCPCs and LCAT-VAWC Desk Officers

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.2a BCPCs and LCAT-VAWC Desk Officers in project areas identify an increased number of victims of OSEC and CLT

3.2b An increased number of BCPC members and community leaders in project areas demonstrate the knowledge to identify cases of OSEC and CLT in their community, how to refer cases to appropriate authorities, and facilitate reintegration of children into their community

3.3 Develop and implement community education programs in selected barangays focused on child protection and child trafficking prevention, with special attention to OSEC and CLT

3.3 DILG, in coordination with DSWD and DOLE, supports partner to select target barangays, and design and implement community education program in project areas

In coordination with similarly focused activities, DILG and other agencies integrate effective community education programs into existing curricula, and implement programs in additional (non-project) areas

3.3 Partner assesses related activities, designs and carries out pilot community education program in selected barangays, assesses effectiveness of program design, revises materials as needed, and promotes sustained use of effective program model

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.3 Community members in selected barangays demonstrate an increase in knowledge of the dangers of OSEC and CLT and a positive shift in attitude toward appropriate response to OSEC and CLT, and begin to take action against the practices

3.4 Strengthen systems to collect and report BCPC and municipal child trafficking data, including disaggregation by age, gender, and type of trafficking

3.4 DILG provides information on existing child trafficking data collection systems and gaps and carry out plan to address gaps

3.4 With agency input, partner assesses gaps in existing barangay and municipal child trafficking data collection system and helps DILG to create and implement a plan to address gaps

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.4 Barangay and municipal child trafficking data is regularly collected, maintained and analyzed, and information is used to improve program activities