Child Protection Compact Partnership Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Jamaica

Office To Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
May 31, 2018

   

The Government of the United States of America (“the United States”) and the Government of Jamaica (“Jamaica”), hereinafter the “Participants”;

Acknowledging the respective leadership roles and responsibilities of the United States Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office) and Jamaica’s National Task Force Against Trafficking in Persons (NATFATIP) and Office of the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons (ONRTIP) in the fight against human trafficking;

Concerned that child trafficking has a devastating and lasting impact on children; undermines security and the rule of law; is sometimes linked to organized crime, gang violence, corrupt officials, or other criminal activity in Jamaica;

Demonstrating our shared interest in partnering to improve efforts to combat all forms of child trafficking in Jamaica and the need for a concerted and well-coordinated response;

Noting Jamaica’s current and planned efforts related to the implementation of its National Plan of Action 2015-2018 for Combating Trafficking in Persons, its draft National Plan of Action for an Integrated Response to Children and Violence, and the recommendations in the United States Department of State’s annual Trafficking in Persons Report to enhance Jamaica’s effectiveness in prosecuting traffickers, protecting victims, and preventing trafficking in persons;

Recognizing existing and ongoing cooperation between the United States and Jamaica on matters related to child trafficking, including programs of the United States Department of State to enhance cooperation among Caribbean countries to combat trafficking in persons, of the United States Agency for International Development to combat gender-based violence including trafficking in persons, of the United States Department of Labor to decrease child labor, and of United States law enforcement agencies to provide investigative support and related training to Jamaican officials; and

Desiring to conclude this Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership, to work collaboratively in Jamaica over the next four years to build on the Jamaican government’s strong existing anti-trafficking efforts to achieve improved and sustainable policies and practices for holding perpetrators of child trafficking criminally accountable, identifying child victims of trafficking in persons, coordinating the provision of comprehensive protective and reintegration services, and preventing child trafficking from occurring in Jamaica;

Have reached the following understandings:

  1. Context for a Partnership against Child Trafficking

The Participants acknowledge that:

  1. Children in Jamaica are subjected to both sex and labor trafficking. Child sex trafficking may occur in bars, nightclubs, hotels, massage parlors, in the tourism sector, and within communities. Child labor trafficking may take the form of domestic servitude, forced criminal activity, forced begging, and forced child labor in fishing, on farms, or in shops, construction sites, or markets. Traffickers may be citizens or non-citizens, business owners or employees, gang members, public officials, family members, acquaintances, or other members of the community including strangers; sexual abuse places children at an increased risk of becoming victims of sex or labor trafficking; and such crimes may occur in all of Jamaica’s fourteen parishes.
  2. Several Jamaican agencies share responsibility for the implementation of programs to prosecute child traffickers, protect child trafficking victims, and prevent child trafficking. The NATFATIP, which receives a dedicated budget, coordinates the implementation of Jamaica’s National Plan of Action 2015-2018 for Combating Trafficking in Persons. The Jamaican government will prepare an updated National Plan of Action for Combating Trafficking in Persons prior to the current plan’s expiration at the end of 2018.
  3. While the Jamaican government has strong political will to combat child trafficking, there is still a need to enhance its efforts in identifying child trafficking victims and successfully prosecuting child trafficking cases.
  4. Child trafficking victims need greater access to comprehensive, trauma-informed protection services, and agencies with responsibility for victim protection need additional funding, resources, and staff to provide this care.
  5. Delays in court cases and the limited availability of services for victims serve as disincentives for them to participate in trials, limiting the effectiveness of judicial processes. The Ministry of Justice’s Victim Services Division (VSD) in Jamaica has limited capacity to provide adequate support to child trafficking victims during trials. There is need for greater cooperation among law enforcement officials and victim service providers to ensure victims receive sustained support. Strengthened protection, reintegration, and follow-up services would support victims’ health and wellbeing, decrease their vulnerability to re-trafficking, and enhance their participation in the criminal justice process.
  6. The Centre for the Investigation of Sexual Offenses and Child Abuse (CISOCA) Unit of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) in Kingston – which engages a team of social workers, medical professionals and legal officers – represents a potential multidisciplinary model for interviewing and providing assistance to child trafficking victims immediately following their removal from trafficking situations.
  7. Nationwide research is needed to better understand the nature and scope of child trafficking in Jamaica and to inform policies and programs to combat this crime.
  8. ONRTIP has limited resources to fulfill its mandate to collect data, monitor, and report on the government’s anti-trafficking efforts. Improved data collection would assist Jamaican government agencies in assessing the effectiveness of existing anti-trafficking efforts, publicizing their work, securing and allocating funds, and developing data-informed policies and programs.
  9. Jamaica has taken steps to investigate and prosecute persons suspected of participating in human trafficking; nonetheless, there are challenges in prosecuting this crime and increased efforts are needed to address this crime and hold accountable persons who participate in or facilitate human trafficking crimes.
  10. Although the Jamaican government has made efforts to educate the public on human trafficking, greater awareness and understanding among the full range of relevant government officials, the public, the media, and civil society is necessary to improve the identification of children exploited in sex or labor trafficking.
  11. Civil society in Jamaica has limited experience in combating human trafficking; building its capacity to recognize and address this problem and to work cooperatively with the government will greatly enhance efforts to identify and protect child trafficking victims and prevent the occurrence of child trafficking.

 

  1. Benefits, Intentions, and Commitments of a CPC Partnership between the Participants

 

This CPC Partnership between the Participants is jointly developed and will be jointly implemented as a four-year plan intended to strengthen the capacity of the Jamaican government and civil society to address all forms of child trafficking in Jamaica effectively and thereby strengthen existing efforts to eradicate these crimes. In support of this CPC Partnership, the Participants commit to the following:

  1. The TIP Office intends to provide 4.5 million United States dollars (USD 4,500,000) in foreign assistance to civil society and/or international organizations that will collaborate and cooperate with relevant NATFATIP representative bodies and other stakeholders to support implementation of the objectives and activities described in Section IV. United States funds will not be provided directly to the Government of Jamaica.

The TIP Office will select implementing partners through a competitive grant application process after the signing of this CPC Partnership, in accordance with all rules and regulations for United States government funding.

The TIP Office will manage the grants to the implementing partners and will facilitate communication including direct communication between implementing partners and participating Jamaican government ministries, departments, and agencies. The TIP Office will provide periodic updates to the Government of Jamaica on the status and outcomes of programs being carried out by implementing partners.

  1. The Government of Jamaica, through its relevant ministries, departments, and agencies, in accordance with its legislative and fiscal responsibility framework, will dedicate appropriate staff resources and operating budget funding to support and sustain achievement of the objectives and activities described in Section IV, throughout the course of this Partnership and with the view to sustaining the activities beyond this four-year Partnership.

The Government of Jamaica will ensure the cooperation of all participating ministries, departments, and agencies throughout the term of this Partnership. Jamaican government ministries, departments, and agencies, as related to their policy and operational responsibilities, will cooperate with the implementing partners to support the goals and objectives.

The Government of Jamaica will develop and implement methods of integrating policies and procedures initiated under this Partnership, as appropriate, into Jamaican law enforcement, judicial, child protection, and community-based governance structures, and the next iteration of its National Plan of Action for Combating Trafficking in Persons.

 

  1. CPC Partnership Purpose

The purpose of this CPC Partnership between the Participants is to strengthen the efforts of the Jamaican government to effectively prosecute and convict child traffickers, and to work with civil society to identify victims of child trafficking, to provide comprehensive trauma-informed care for child victims of these crimes, and to prevent child trafficking in all its forms.

  1. CPC Partnership Objectives and Activities

Objective 1: Increase the number of victim-centered investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of child trafficking cases.

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants will cooperate in the following areas and activities:

    1. Develop and/or strengthen existing national inter- and intra-agency protocols for coordination between criminal justice system officials and victim advocates and service providers, and implement these protocols to ensure effective victim-centered handling of child trafficking cases from detection through prosecution;
    1. Improve methods for ensuring victim-centered approaches (i.e., providing child-friendly trauma-informed services and prioritizing the protection, security, and wellbeing of the victim) in law enforcement operations, investigations, and criminal justice proceedings, including by enhancing the capacity of social workers at the Child Protection and Family Services Agency (CPFSA) and personnel at the Ministry of Justice’s Victim Services Division (VSD), as well as coordination with civil society;
    1. Improve the technical capacity of investigators, prosecutors, and judges and develop methods to enable effective and timely judicial processes and sentencing in trafficking cases;
    1. Using existing infrastructure such as CISOCA Units, establish multidisciplinary, child-friendly spaces in locations across the country, for interviewing child trafficking victims and providing medical and psycho-social care immediately following their removal from trafficking situations;
    1. Increase resources to enhance ONRTIP’s capacity to collect data, monitor, and report on anti-trafficking efforts, particularly the implementation of victim-centered methods during investigations and prosecutions;
    1. Increase efforts to detect, investigate, criminally prosecute, and punish officials who permit or facilitate trafficking crimes; and
    1. Strengthen and maintain systems to collect and report relevant investigation, prosecution, conviction, and sentencing data, including disaggregation by number of defendants, the criminal offense charged, type of exploitation, and age, gender, and place of origin of victims.

Objective 2: Strengthen government and civil society capacity to identify and provide comprehensive services to more child trafficking victims, from identification through protective care, community reintegration, and long-term follow-up services.

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants will cooperate in the following areas and activities:

2.1 Develop standardized procedures for identification of victims, including

screening vulnerable children to determine whether they may be victims of sex or labor trafficking, and a national referral mechanism for referring suspected victims to appropriate authorities and/or select NGOs as deemed appropriate by the Government of Jamaica for further investigation and comprehensive care;

2.2 Provide training to relevant authorities (including frontline police in the

JCF and all CISOCA officers; social workers; staff of the Children’s Registry; healthcare workers; justices of the peace; the Ministry of Labour and Social Security’s Occupational Safety and Health inspectors, investigators, labor officers, and social workers; immigration officers; and consular officers) on all forms of child sex and labor trafficking and procedures for implementing victim identification and referral guidelines nationwide;

2.3 Designate a lead agency, such as CPFSA, to provide individual case management and coordinate the provision of comprehensive services to child trafficking victims (from identification through reintegration and follow-up, and relevant criminal proceedings) and develop this agency’s capacity to serve in this role;

2.4 Strengthen the capacity of relevant authorities to provide individualized comprehensive, trauma-informed care to child trafficking victims (including shelter, medical care, case management, psycho-social counseling, repatriation, temporary or long-term residency, education and/or job training, legal assistance, reintegration, and follow-up) and develop and/or strengthen existing policies to clearly articulate their respective roles, responsibilities, and authorities;

2.5 Using existing infrastructure, expand the availability of shelter spaces that are appropriately staffed and equipped to provide quality care to all child trafficking victims;

2.6 Expand the availability of psychologists, psychiatrists, community mental health nurses, social workers including social workers assigned to the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, and victim services staff across the country that are equipped to provide specialized psycho-social care to child trafficking victims;

2.7 Build the capacity of civil society organizations to proactively identify and respond to child trafficking crimes and to collaborate with government authorities to provide trauma-informed care to child trafficking victims from identification through reintegration and follow up;

2.8 Increase resources to enhance ONRTIP’s capacity to collect data, monitor, and report on the provision of comprehensive protective services to child trafficking victims;

2.9 Increase reintegration and follow-up services for child trafficking victims, including risk assessment, preparation for reintegration, and connecting victims and /or their families to livelihood opportunities; and

2.10 Strengthen and maintain systems to collect and report data on victims of child trafficking and services provided, including disaggregation by age, gender, place of origin, and type of exploitation.

Objective 3: Increase efforts to prevent child trafficking, including through developing and strengthening community-based mechanisms.

In order to achieve this objective, the Participants will cooperate in the following areas and activities:

3.1 Conduct nationwide research on the prevalence of child sex and labor trafficking in Jamaica and the nature of these crimes, including links to other criminal activity such as gang violence and child sexual abuse and the sociocultural factors that make children vulnerable to these crimes;

3.2 Develop and finalize an updated National Plan of Action for Combating Trafficking in Persons prior to the expiration of the current plan, and secure adequate funds for its implementation;

3.3  Build the capacity of Social Development Commission (SDC) personnel, community health aides, school staff, religious leaders, civil society members, and the public to proactively identify child trafficking victims, including cases of domestic servitude, sex trafficking occurring within the community, and less recognized forms of child trafficking; take appropriate action once cases are identified; and facilitate the reintegration of child trafficking victims into their communities;

3. 4 Develop and implement comprehensive community-based outreach and education activities that are targeted, locally appropriate, and have a particular focus on identifying, responding to, and preventing child trafficking crimes that occur within the community;

3. 5 Take steps to prevent foreign nationals from exploiting Jamaican children in sex trafficking, including through cooperating with foreign authorities to prevent suspected child sex tourists from entering the country; and

3.6 Strengthen systems to collect and report parish data on prevention activities and community-based victim identification efforts, including disaggregation by age, gender, type of exploitation.

  1. Departments, Offices, and Institutions Participating in the CPC Partnership
  1. The Government of the United States:

United States Department of State

  • Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office)

The TIP Office leads the United States’ global engagement to combat human trafficking. The Office partners with foreign governments, international organizations, and civil society to develop and implement effective strategies for confronting trafficking in persons, including through targeted foreign assistance implementing the “3P” paradigm: prosecuting traffickers, protecting victims, and preventing trafficking.

  • Embassy of the United States in Kingston

The Embassy coordinates directly with the Government of Jamaica to advance the shared goal of combating trafficking in persons. Embassy offices collaborate with Jamaican government and civil society counterparts to sensitize the public, train officials to identify victims and prosecute trafficking in persons cases, and cooperate with Jamaican authorities in international trafficking investigations.

  1. The Government of Jamaica
  • National Taskforce Against Trafficking in Persons (NATFATIP)

NATFATIP is chaired by the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Justice and composed of the Ministry of Justice; Ministry of National Security; Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade; Jamaica Constabulary Force; Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions; Ministry of Labor and Social Security; Ministry of Health; Ministry of Education, Youth, and Information; Ministry of Tourism; Attorney General’s Office; Child Protection and Family Services Agency; Passport, Immigration, and Citizenship Agency; Bureau of Gender Affairs; Planning Institute of Jamaica; Victim Services Division; Center for Investigation of Sexual Offenses and Child Abuse; Office of the Children’s Advocate; Justice Training Institute, among others. It functions through three sub-committees responsible for addressing prevention, protection, and prosecution. Each sub-committee includes representatives from multiple agencies and organizations in order to coordinate activities under Jamaica’s National Plan of Action 2015-2018 for Combating Trafficking in Persons.

  • Office of the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons (ONRTIP)

The National Rapporteur reports to Parliament on issues relating to trafficking in persons in Jamaica, including the outcomes of the government’s efforts to combat trafficking in persons and any violations of the rights of victims. ONRTIP also has the authority to conduct independent reviews of alleged instances of trafficking in persons.

  • Other Jamaican government entities at the national and local levels, such as the Ministry of Local Government and Community Development and the Heart Trust, may participate in activities in support of the objectives of the CPC Partnership.
  1. Communications

The Government of Jamaica will establish a CPC Partnership technical committee comprised of representatives designated by each participating Ministry, Department and Agency (MDA) who are knowledgeable of relevant operations and would serve as focal persons to work on implementation of the Partnership, ensure that reporting requirements are met, and work collaboratively with NATFATIP.

Communications required under this CPC Partnership will be in writing and submitted to the Point of Contact (POC) designated by each Participant as indicated below. Notice of a change in POC should be provided in writing to the other POCs within 30 days of such change. The POCs will facilitate intra- and interagency communication regarding CPC Partnership activities, including semi-annual reporting to the NATFATIP of progress toward meeting objectives and completing activities of the CPC Partnership.

Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons POC:

Name: Kendra Kreider
Title: Senior Advisor
Institution: United States Department of State
Office: Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
Email address: kreiderk@state.gov
Telephone: +1-202-312-9824

Ministry of Justice/National Task Force Against Trafficking in Persons POC:

Name: Carol Palmer
Title: Permanent Secretary
Institution: Ministry of Justice/National Task Force Against Trafficking in Persons
Office: Office of the Permanent Secretary
Email address: carol.palmer@moj.gov.jm
Telephone: (876) 906-2404

  1. Effective Date and Limitations

This CPC Partnership will become effective on the date of its signature by designated representatives of the Participants and will remain effective for four years from that date. TIP Office-supported activities will commence before the end of 2018 and extend through 2022. This Partnership does not constitute an international agreement and does not create any binding obligations between the Participants under either international or domestic law. Activities of each Participant will be subject to budget availability, in accordance with national legislation.

  1. Modification

This CPC Partnership may be modified or extended with the mutual written consent of the Participants.

  1. Sustainability

The Participants aim for the policy and operational improvements in Jamaica’s response to all forms of child trafficking, which will have been achieved with the support and during the course of this CPC Partnership, to continue following the conclusion of this CPC Partnership. Within two years of the signing of this Partnership the NATFATIP will develop a plan for sustaining such improvements.

  1. Reporting Progress and Evaluating Impact of the CPC Partnership
  1. NATFATIP, on behalf of the Government of Jamaica, will provide semi-annual reports to the TIP Office describing progress toward meeting the objectives and completing the activities of the CPC Partnership, including quantitative and qualitative data corresponding to associated performance indicators to be developed in writing with the mutual consent of the Participants.
  2. The TIP Office will monitor the progress of implementing partners toward meeting the CPC Partnership objectives and completing the activities. The TIP Office will also fund an evaluation of this Partnership, with collaboration from the Participants.
  3. The Participants will meet annually to share information, taking into account any requirements for confidentiality, and discuss progress toward achieving the objectives and completing the activities of the CPC Partnership.
  1. Resolution of Differences

Any differences that may arise regarding the interpretation of or implementation of activities under this Partnership will be resolved through consultations between the Participants in an amicable manner.

Signed in Kingston on May 31, 2018, in two originals, in the English language.

______________________________ ______________________________

 

For the Government of the United States of America

For the Government of Jamaica

U.S.-Jamaica CPC Partnership Implementation Plan

Objective 1: Increase the number of victim-centered investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of child trafficking cases.

 

Key Activities:

Roles and Responsibilities of Government of Jamaica Ministries, Departments, and Agencies (MDAs)

TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partners

1.1 Develop and/or strengthen existing national inter- and intra-agency protocols for coordination between criminal justice system officials and victim advocates and service providers, and implement these protocols to ensure effective victim-centered handling of child trafficking cases from detection through prosecution

1.1a Participating MDAs provide information about existing protocols and practices and input for developing and/or strengthening them

1.1b Participating MDAs designate staff for training and provide input to training materials

1.1c Participating MDAs adopt and implement updated protocols, assess their ongoing effectiveness, and work with partner to update protocols as needed

1.1a Partner works with participating MDAs to assess existing protocols and effectiveness of coordination on cases, and works with participating MDAs to develop and/or strengthen existing protocols and practices

1.1b Partner trains relevant MDAs in implementation of protocols

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.1a All participating MDAs effectively utilize protocols for child trafficking cases

1.2 Improve methods for ensuring victim-centered approaches (i.e., providing child-friendly trauma-informed services and prioritizing the protection, security, and wellbeing of the victim) in law enforcement operations, investigations, and criminal justice proceedings, including by enhancing the capacity of social workers at the Child Protection and Family Services Agency (CPFSA) and personnel at the Ministry of Justice’s Victim Services Division (VSD), as well as coordination with civil society

1.2a JCF, Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), and the judiciary designate staff for training; integrate specialized training into standard curriculum for relevant officers; and provide information to partner on additional or ongoing training needs

1.2b JCF issues guidance that all anti-trafficking operations should follow victim-centered practices

1.2c Ministry of Justice (MOJ) and CPFSA work with partner to develop a plan to ensure each child trafficking victim has access to consistent support through the entirety of the criminal justice process

1.2d DPP, the judiciary, and the Office of the Children’s Advocate (OCA) provide information to partner on current policies and practices and provide input for strengthening victim-centered procedures in court proceedings

1.2e DPP and the judiciary review and assess current practices in prosecutions and court proceedings involving child victims/witnesses and recommend changes that will reduce the trauma for children, such as the use of pre-recorded testimony, live video technology, special programs that prepare child witnesses for court, court accompaniment by child advocates, and separate waiting areas

1.2a Partner provides training to JCF officers – including Counter-Terrorism and Organized Crime Investigation Branch (CTOC), CISOCA and Proactive Investigation Units (PIUs) – prosecutors, and judges in victim-centered interview and criminal justice proceeding techniques and, as relevant, operational approaches to employ victim-centered practices during law enforcement operations; works with government to institutionalize specialized training

1.2b Partner assists government, as appropriate, to increase the availability of victim services staff (such as providing supplemental staff through partnerships with civil society and/or technical support to CPFSA and MOJ to increase personnel)

1.2c Partner works with DPP and the judiciary to assess current practices and recommend improved policies and practices for prosecutions and court proceedings that reduce the trauma for child victims who serve as witnesses, such as the use of live video technology, pre-recorded testimony, special programs that prepare child witnesses for court, court accompaniment by child advocates, and separate waiting areas

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.2a Increased number of successful victim-centered investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of child sex and labor trafficking cases

1.2b Increased number/percentage of identified child trafficking victims have consistent support from CPFSA and/or VSD throughout the criminal justice process

1.3 Improve the technical capacity of investigators, prosecutors, and judges and develop methods to enable effective and timely judicial processes and sentencing in trafficking cases

1.3a JCF, DPP, and the judiciary designate staff for training, including police from PIUs; provide input into training curriculum design; and provide implementing partner with information about additional training or mentoring for staff as needed

1.3b JCF, DPP, and the judiciary integrate specialized training into existing training curricula 1.3c MOJ and judiciary assess challenges to timely judicial processes and current and planned judicial reform efforts and take steps to conduct court proceedings in a more timely manner; MOJ and DPP assess challenges to timely prosecutions and take steps to conduct prosecutions in a more timely manner

1.3a Partner provides basic and advanced training, including techniques for intelligence-driven operations; follow-up mentoring; and other support for JCF, DPP, and the judiciary

1.3b Partner works with JCF, DPP, and the judiciary to institutionalize specialized training on trafficking investigations, prosecutions, and convictions through MDA training academies or other relevant institutions

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.3a Increased number of investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of child sex and child labor trafficking cases

1.3b Increased percentage of child sex and labor trafficking investigations lead to prosecutions

1.3c Increased number of child trafficking prosecutions are concluded within one year

1.4 Using existing infrastructure such as CISOCA Units, establish multidisciplinary, child-friendly spaces in locations across the country, for interviewing child trafficking victims and providing medical and psycho-social care immediately following their removal from trafficking situations

1.4a JCF identifies an adequate number of physical spaces (i.e., a building or part of a building) to cover each of its five police areas that is private and removed from frontline police work to be provided for this purpose

1.4b CPFSA, Ministry Of Health (MOH) and MOJ designate social workers, medical doctors and VSD representatives to provide services at each location, including on-site staff when possible.

1.4c JCF ensures these locations are available for interviewing child trafficking victims, and that interviews employ victim-centered techniques

1.4d JCF and NATFATIP maintain the furnishings provided by the partner and obtain necessary resources for long-term maintenance

1.4a Partner provides initial furnishings, repairs, and assists with purchase of equipment (including video equipment if appropriate) for each location

1.4b. Partner works with relevant MDAs to provide training for personnel at each location

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.4a Increased number of multidisciplinary spaces are available and appropriately staffed

1.4b Multidisciplinary spaces are used appropriately in an increased number of child trafficking cases

1.5 Increase resources to enhance ONRTIP’s capacity to collect data, monitor, and report on anti-trafficking efforts, particularly the implementation of victim-centered methods during investigations and prosecutions

1.5a ONRTIP will leverage its existing resources to fulfill its mandate, including by publishing an annual report on the government’s anti-trafficking efforts, and will work with partner to develop a plan for obtaining additional resources

1.5b Government of Jamaica increases financial and personnel resources for ONRTIP

1.5a Partner will provide direct technical support to ONRTIP to fulfill its mandate and technical support for obtaining additional resources

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.5a ONRTIP publishes report on government’s anti-trafficking efforts annually

1.5b ONRTIP has increased resources to fulfill its mandate

1.6 Increase efforts to detect, investigate, criminally prosecute, and punish officials who permit or facilitate trafficking crimes

1.6a Government of Jamaica develops a plan for increasing efforts to address trafficking-related complicity

1.6b Relevant MDAs provide input for training curriculum and information campaign design and integrate training into standard curriculum

1.6c Relevant MDAs provide information to partner on existing reporting mechanisms and collaborate to identify weaknesses and strengthen procedures

1.6a Partner collaborates with relevant MDAs to design and deliver training for government officials and information campaigns to the public on methods for reporting suspected official complicity in child trafficking, including provisions in the Protected Disclosures Act; works with government to institutionalize such training

1.6b Partner provides technical assistance for MDAs to improve reporting procedures

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.6 Increased number of investigations, prosecutions, and convictions of officials who permit or facilitate trafficking crimes

1.7 Strengthen and maintain systems to collect and report relevant investigation, prosecution, conviction, and sentencing data, including disaggregation by number of defendants, the criminal offense charged, type of exploitation, and age, gender, and place of origin of victims

1.7a Participating MDAs provide information about existing data collection systems and gaps and help implement plan to address gaps

1.7a Partner works with participating MDAs to assess gaps in existing data collection system and creates plan to address gaps

Associated Performance Indicators:

1.7a Data on an increased number/percentage of relevant cases – including investigation, prosecution, conviction, and sentencing data on child trafficking cases, disaggregated by number of defendants, criminal offense charged, type of exploitation and age, gender, and place of origin of victims – is collected, maintained and analyzed

         

Objective 2: Strengthen government and civil society capacity to identify and provide comprehensive services to more child trafficking victims, from identification through protective care, community reintegration, and long-term follow-up services.

 

Key Activities:

Roles and Responsibilities of Government of Jamaica Ministries, Departments, and Agencies (MDAs)

TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partners

2.1 Develop standardized procedures for identification of victims, including screening vulnerable children to determine whether they may be victims of sex or labor trafficking, and a national referral mechanism for referring suspected victims to appropriate authorities and/or select NGOs as deemed appropriate by the Government of Jamaica for further investigation and comprehensive care

2.1a Participating MDAs provide information about current policies and procedures to proactively identify victims from among vulnerable groups and national referral mechanisms, and provide input on developing and/or strengthening these procedures to be more systematic and effective

2.1b Participating MDAs adopt and implement new or strengthened procedures for victim identification and referral

2.1c Government of Jamaica develops a directory of NGOs designated to provide services to child trafficking victims and, as necessary, grants them the requisite approvals to do so

2.1a Partner works with participating MDAs to assess existing victim identification and referral procedures and identifies gaps in design or implementation that limit effectiveness

2.1b Partner assists participating agencies to develop or strengthen existing identification procedures

2.1c Partner assists participating agencies to strengthen and standardize existing referral mechanisms, including for immediately referring victims to receive comprehensive care

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.1 Participating MDAs effectively implement procedures for victim identification and referral

2.2 Provide training to relevant authorities (including frontline police in the JCF and all CISOCA officers; social workers; staff of the Children’s Registry; healthcare workers; justices of the peace; the Ministry of Labour and Social Security’s Occupational Safety and Health inspectors, investigators, labor officers, and social workers; immigration officers; and consular officers) on all forms of child sex and labor trafficking and procedures for implementing victim identification and referral guidelines nationwide

2.2a Participating MDAs designate staff for training

2.2b Participating MDAs integrate specialized training on victim identification and referral procedures into standard curriculum for relevant staff in their institutions and provide information to partner on additional or ongoing training needs

2.2a Partner provides training on victim identification and referral procedures to participating agencies, assesses effectiveness of this training, works with MDAs to institutionalize training, and provides follow up support as needed

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.2a Relevant authorities identify an increased number of child sex and labor trafficking victims

2.2b Relevant authorities effectively refer an increased number of child sex and labor trafficking victims for investigation and care

 

2.3 Designate a lead agency, such as CPFSA, to provide individual case management and coordinate the provision of comprehensive services to child trafficking victims (from identification through reintegration and follow-up, and relevant criminal proceedings) and develop this agency’s capacity to serve in this role

2.3a The Government of Jamaica designates a government entity to serve as the first point of contact to receive referrals of suspected child trafficking victims, and to continuously manage their care and protection, including through facilitating access to services from other MDAs

2.3b The Government of Jamaica takes necessary steps to ensure such agency has the relevant legal authority to identify child trafficking victims, to provide them with direct services, and to facilitate their access to services from other MDAs

2.3c The designated government entity works with partner to design and implement capacity building for relevant authorities

2.3d The designated government entity develops a plan to increase specialized personnel

2.3a Partner works with designated agency to design and implement plan for capacity building of relevant authorities

2.3b Partner assists designated agency, as appropriate, to supplement its human resource capacity, such as providing technical support to increase personnel or facilitating partnerships with NGOs and private practitioners

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.3 Increased number/percentage of identified child trafficking victims receive individualized case management and comprehensive services from identification through reintegration and follow up and relevant criminal proceedings

2.4 Strengthen the capacity of relevant authorities to provide individualized comprehensive, trauma-informed care to child trafficking victims (including shelter, medical care, case management, psycho-social counseling, repatriation, temporary or long-term residency, education and/or job training, legal assistance, reintegration, and follow-up) and develop and/or strengthen existing policies to clearly articulate their respective roles, responsibilities, and authorities

2.4a Participating MDAs provide partner with information about victim protection policies and practices, and work with partner to identify gaps and develop strategies to strengthen these efforts

2.4b The Government of Jamaica takes steps, as necessary, to ensure MDAs have the appropriate mandates to deliver services to trafficking victims and make decisions about victims’ care and protection

2.4c Participating MDAs adopt and implement new or strengthened policies and practices on trauma-informed victim protection and increase interagency cooperation

2.4a Partner works with participating MDAs to develop a plan to strengthen existing policies to clarify the roles and responsibilities of relevant MDAs to deliver services to victims and make decisions about victims’ care and protection, and to ensure each child trafficking victim has access to the full range of protective services, regardless of their individual circumstances or the status of their legal case

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.4a Increased number/percentage of identified child trafficking victims receive individualized comprehensive, trauma-informed care

2.4b Relevant authorities effectively implement new or existing policies and cooperate effectively within their respective roles, responsibilities and authorities

2.5 Using existing infrastructure, expand the availability of shelter spaces that are appropriately staffed and equipped to provide quality care to all child trafficking

victims

2.5a CPFSA identifies appropriate spaces within its existing facilities and converts them into shelters for child trafficking victims

2.5b CPFSA dedicates trained social workers to provide psycho-social support and case management to victims residing in shelters, including the existing TIP shelter

2.5c CPFSA, NATFATIP, and other relevant MDAs ensure that all staff in shelters, including the existing TIP shelter, are trained on trauma-informed care and integrate such specialized training into standard curriculum for relevant staff

2.5d CPFSA and NATFATIP maintain the furnishings and repairs provided by the partner and obtain necessary resources for long-term maintenance

2.5e CPFSA and NATFATIP work to increase services and activities available to victims in shelters, including through partnerships with civil society organizations

2.5f CPFSA and NATFATIP work with partner to designate select non-governmental facilities to serve as shelters for child trafficking victims and build their capacity to provide trauma-informed care

2.5a Partner works with CPFSA and NATFATIP to assess gaps in availability of shelter spaces for all child trafficking victims and identify appropriate number and location of spaces

2.5b Partner provides initial furnishings, repairs, and supplies for new TIP shelter spaces

2.5c Partner provides training on trauma-informed and specialized care to all shelter staff; works with government to institutionalize specialized training

 

2.5d Partner works with CPFSA and NATFATIP to designate select non-governmental facilities to serve as shelters for child trafficking victims and build their capacity to provide trauma-informed care

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.5a An increased number of shelter spaces that are appropriately staffed and equipped to provide quality care to all child trafficking victims is available.

2.5b An increased number of child sex and labor trafficking victims receive services in appropriately equipped and staffed shelters

2.6 Expand the availability of psychologists, psychiatrists, community mental health nurses, social workers including social workers assigned to the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, and victim services staff across the country that are equipped to provide specialized psycho-social care to child trafficking victims

2.6a Participating MDAs designate staff for training and work with partner to identify appropriate private-sector professionals to be included in training; provide input into training curriculum design; assess whether trained staff have the appropriate skills to provide specialized trauma-informed care to victims; ensure that specially trained personnel are assigned to work with child trafficking victims; and provide information to partner on additional or ongoing training needs

2.6b Participating MDAs support partner to institutionalize specialized training, such as through integrating training into standard curriculum for relevant staff

2.6a Partner provides specialized training and follow up mentoring for each MDA

2.6b Partner works with relevant MDAs to institutionalize specialized training for psychosocial caregivers in Jamaica (i.e. working through universities and MDA training academies)

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.6a An increased number of skilled professionals provide psycho-social support to child trafficking victims

2.6b An increased number of child trafficking victims receive ongoing psycho-social support from trained professionals

2.7 Build the capacity of civil society organizations to proactively identify and respond to child trafficking crimes and to collaborate with government authorities to provide trauma-informed care to child trafficking victims from identification through

reintegration and follow up

2.7a Relevant MDAs work with partner and selected civil society organizations to develop policies and protocols to facilitate partnerships in the provision of services to victims

2.7a Partner delivers training to select civil society organizations to identify and respond to child trafficking crimes and to provide trauma-informed care to all child trafficking victims; trainings may be delivered jointly to governmental and nongovernmental officials, as appropriate

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.7a An increased number of child sex and labor trafficking victims are identified by civil society organizations

2.7b An increased number of skilled civil society professionals provide trauma-informed services to child trafficking victims

2.7c An increased number of child trafficking victims receive services from trained civil society professionals

2.8 Increase resources to enhance ONRTIP’s capacity to collect data, monitor, and report on the provision of comprehensive protective services to child trafficking victims

2.8a ONRTIP will leverage its existing resources to fulfill its mandate, including by publishing an annual report on the government’s anti-trafficking efforts, and will work with partner to develop a plan for obtaining additional resources

2.8 b Government of Jamaica increases financial and personnel resources for ONRTIP

2.8a Partner will provide direct technical support to ONRTIP to fulfill its mandate and technical support for obtaining additional resources

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.8 ONRTIP has increased resources to fulfill its mandate

2.9 Increase reintegration and follow-up services for child trafficking victims, including risk assessment, preparation for reintegration, and connecting

victims and /or their families to livelihood opportunities

2.9a Participating MDAs work with partner to develop standardized victim assessment and reintegration procedures and adopt and implement new or strengthened policies on reintegration

2.9b NATFATIP and participating MDAs provide information about existing social security, vocational training programs, and community initiatives – including those administered through the Ministry of Labor and Social Security and, the Heart Trust/NTA, and the SDC – and work with partner to develop mechanisms to seamlessly connect child trafficking victims and their families to these programs

2.9c Participating MDAs cooperate with civil society and private sector partners to connect child trafficking victims and their families to services

2.9a Partner assists participating MDAs to develop standardized procedures to guide case managers in preparing an individual reintegration plan for each identified child trafficking victim

2.9b Partner assists NATFATIP and MDAs to develop mechanisms to connect child trafficking victims and their families to existing social security and vocational programs

2.9c Partner works with participating MDAs to assess existing livelihood support programs provided through civil society or the private sector and develops procedures to systematically connect child trafficking victims and their families to these services

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.9a Individual reintegration plans are developed and implemented for an increased percentage of identified child trafficking victims

2.9b An increased percentage of identified child trafficking victims and/or their families receive livelihood development opportunities

2.10 Strengthen and maintain systems to collect and report data on victims of child trafficking and services provided, including disaggregation by age, gender, place of origin, and type of exploitation

2.10a Participating MDAs provide information about existing data collection system gaps and work to implement plan to address gaps.

2.10 Partner works with participating MDAs to assess gaps in existing data collection system and works with relevant MDAs to create plan to address gaps

Associated Performance Indicators:

2.10a Data on an increased number/percentage of relevant cases – including victims identified and services provided, disaggregated by age, gender, place of origin, and type of exploitation – is collected, maintained, and analyzed

Objective 3: Increase efforts to prevent child trafficking, including through developing and strengthening community-based mechanisms.

Key Activities:

Roles and Responsibilities of Government of Jamaica Ministries, Departments, and Agencies (MDAs)

TIP Office-Supported Activities, through Implementing Partners

3.1 Conduct nationwide research on the prevalence of child sex and labor trafficking in Jamaica and the nature of these crimes, including links to other criminal activity such as gang violence and child sexual abuse and the sociocultural factors that make children vulnerable to these crimes

3.1 All participating MDAs provide information to support research, facilitate dissemination of research findings, and integrate relevant findings into policies and practices

3.1a Partner conducts rigorous nationwide research, to the extent possible, on the prevalence of child sex and labor trafficking in Jamaica and the nature of these crimes, and works with agencies on dissemination of findings

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.1a New research on the nature and prevalence of child sex and labor trafficking in Jamaica is disseminated to inform agencies and the public

3.1b New research informs subsequent CPC Partnership activities

3.2 Develop and finalize an updated National Plan of Action for Combating Trafficking in Persons prior to the expiration of the current plan, and secure adequate funds for its implementation

3.2a NATFATIP, with input and cooperation from its member entities, will develop an updated National Plan of Action (NPA), obtain necessary approvals for its formal adoption by the Government of Jamaica, and lead efforts to seek adequate resources for its implementation

3.2b NATFATIP and its member entities will integrate activities and objectives of the CPC Partnership into the NPA

3.2c Member entities of NATFATIP will obtain sufficient resources and personnel to fulfill their respective mandates under the NPA

3.2a Partner will provide technical support to NATFATIP and its member entities to develop an updated NPA and seek adequate resources and personnel to fully implement the NPA

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.2 Updated NPA is adopted and integrates activities of the CPC Partnership

3.2b Member entities of NATFATIP obtain sufficient resources and personnel to fulfill their mandates under the NPA

3.3 Build the capacity of Social Development Commission personnel, community health aides, school staff, religious leaders, civil society members, and the public to proactively identify child trafficking victims, including cases of domestic servitude, sex trafficking occurring within the community, and less recognized forms of child trafficking; take appropriate action once cases are identified; and facilitate the reintegration of child trafficking victims into their communities

3.3a Participating MDAs designate staff for training

3.3b Participating MDAs expand and integrate specialized training on victim identification and referral procedures into standard curriculum for relevant staff in their institutions and provide information to partner on additional or ongoing training needs

3.3a Partner delivers training to participating MDAs and nongovernmental stakeholders on identifying and responding to suspected cases of child sex and labor trafficking

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.3a Participating stakeholders identify an increased number of child sex and labor trafficking victims

3.3b An increased number of stakeholders demonstrate the knowledge to identify cases of child sex and labor trafficking in their community, how to refer cases to appropriate authorities for investigation and comprehensive care, and facilitate reintegration of children into their community

3.4 Develop and implement comprehensive community-based outreach and education activities that are targeted, locally appropriate, and have a particular focus on identifying, responding to, and preventing child trafficking crimes that occur within the community

3.4a Participating MDAs, including the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Information, assist partner in selecting pilot communities and designing and implementing community education program

3.4b Participating MDAs integrate effective community education programs into existing curricula and replicate programming in additional locations

3.4a Partner collaborates with participating MDAs to design and deliver pilot community outreach and education programs, assess effectiveness of program design, revise materials as needed, and promote sustained use of effective model

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.4 Community members in selected locations demonstrate an increase in knowledge of the dangers of child sex and labor trafficking, appropriately identify and refer victims, and begin to take action against these practices

3.5 Take steps to prevent foreign nationals from exploiting Jamaican children in sex trafficking, including through cooperating with foreign authorities to prevent suspected child sex tourists from entering the country

3.5a The Passport, Immigration, and Citizenship Agency – in partnership with NATFATIP or other MDAs, as appropriate – strengthens procedures for receiving and responding to reports of suspected child sex tourists

3.5b Relevant MDAs will work with partner to develop a strategy for strengthening efforts to combat child sex trafficking in the tourist sector

3.5a Based on the potential result of research findings, partner will work with relevant MDAs to develop a strategy for strengthening efforts to combat child sex trafficking in the tourist sector

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.5a An increased percentage of suspected child sex tourists are prevented from entering Jamaica

3.5b Strategy for strengthening efforts to combat child sex trafficking in the tourist sector is developed and implemented

3.6 Strengthen systems to collect and report parish data on prevention activities and community-based victim identification efforts, including disaggregation by age, gender, type of exploitation

3.6a Participating MDAs provide information about existing data collection system gaps and implement a plan to address gaps

3.6a Partner works with participating MDAs to assess gaps in existing data collection system and works with relevant MDAs to create plan to address gaps

Associated Performance Indicators:

3.6a Parish-level child trafficking data is regularly collected, maintained and analyzed, and information is used to improve program activities