REPORT FOR THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

UNITED STATES SENATE

SUBJECT: Ambassadorial Nomination: Certificate of Demonstrated Competence — Foreign Service Act, Section 304(a)(4)

POST: Co-operative Republic of Guyana

CANDIDATE: Sarah-Ann Lynch

Sarah-Ann Lynch is a career member of the Senior Foreign Service with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), class of Minister-Counselor. Since 2015 she has been Senior Deputy Assistant Administrator (and Acting Assistant Administrator for ten months) of USAID’s Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Previously, Ms. Lynch was the USAID Mission Director in Iraq (2013–2014) and the Director of USAID’s Office of Iraq and Arabian Peninsula Affairs (2011–2013). She also served as the Director of the Afghanistan – Pakistan Task Force’s Strategy, Program, Monitoring, and Evaluation Office in Washington (2009–2010) and as Director of the Office of Program and Project Development for USAID Afghanistan (2008–2009). Her extensive knowledge of the Caribbean, demonstrated skill as a senior leader and policy maker addressing complex foreign policy and development challenges, and her ability to work effectively with inter-agency partners in difficult environments make Ms. Lynch an excellent candidate for Ambassador to Guyana.

Ms. Lynch’s other assignments include postings in Peru and Bangladesh as a Program Officer, and assignments as Deputy Director of the Strategy and Program Office, and as Deputy Director and then Acting Director of the Office of South American Affairs, both with the LAC Bureau in Washington.

Ms. Lynch earned her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College in 1982, and an M.A.L.D. degree from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, in 1988. She also received an M.S. from the National War College, in 2011. Ms. Lynch has received numerous notable awards for her performance including a Special Act Award for Superior Accomplishment and a Distinguished Honor Award. She speaks Arabic, French and Spanish.

U.S. Department of State

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