Chapter 4: References



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Berliner, D. C. & Biddle, B. (1995). The manufactured crisis: Myth, fraud and the attack on America's public schools. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley.

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Brandt, R. (1998). Powerful learning. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Brooks, J. G. & Brooks, M. G. (1993). In search of understanding: The case for constructivist classrooms. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Caine, R. N. & Caine, G. (1991). Making connections: Teaching and the human brain. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Caine, R. N. & Caine, G. (1997). Education on the edge of possibility. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Costa, A. L. & Garmston, R. (1994). Cognitive coaching: A foundation for renaissance schools. Norwood, Ma.: Christopher-Gordon Publishers.

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Gleick, J. (1987). Chaos: Making a new science. New York: Penguin.

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Villa, R. A. & Thousand, J. S., Eds. Creating an inclusive school. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Jensen, E. (1998). Teaching with the brain in mind. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Lareau, A. (1989). Home advantage. Philadelphia: Falmer.

Lavoie, R. (1990). How Difficult Can This Be? F.A.T. City . Alexandria, Va.: PBS Video.

Le Doux, J. (1996). The emotional brain. New York: Simon & Schuster.

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Sapolsky, R. (1999). Why zebras don't get ulcers: an updated guide to stress, stress-related diseases, and coping. New York: W.H. Freeman & Co.

Sylwester, R. (1995). A celebration of neurons: An educator's guide to the human brain. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Vygotsky, L. (1986). Thought and language. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press.

Wolfe, P. & Brandt, R. (1998). What do we know about brain research? In Educational Leadership, 56:3, pp. 8 - 13.

Wolfe, P. (October, 1997). Keynote Address to the Association of International Schools in Africa Teachers and Administrators Conference, "Educational Implications of Research on the Brain," Nairobi, Kenya.