Young, Andrew Robert - Burkina Faso - June 2016


REPORT FOR THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

UNITED STATES SENATE

SUBJECT: Ambassadorial Nomination: Certificate of
Demonstrated Competence -- Foreign Service
Act, Section 304(a)(4)

POST: Burkina Faso

CANDIDATE: Andrew Robert Young

Andrew Robert Young, a career member of the Senior Foreign Service, class of Counselor, currently serves as Deputy Chief of Mission at U.S. Embassy Bamako, Mali, a position he has held since 2013. Mr. Young is widely recognized for his democracy promotion work across several world regions, and his ability to develop and maintain high staff morale, even under difficult circumstances. His regional expertise and demonstrated ability to work well with a wide variety of U.S. agencies and local populations on difficult issues, such as Ebola and countering terrorism, make him an excellent choice for U.S. Ambassador to Burkina Faso.

Previously, Mr. Young was a Korean language student and served as Information Officer at U.S. Embassy Seoul, Korea (2010-2013). Prior to that, he served as Political Counselor at U.S. Embassy Paris, France (2007-2010), and Desk Officer for Italy and San Marino in the Bureau of European Affairs at the Department of State (2005-2007). He also served as Foreign Policy Advisor to Senator Joe Lieberman (2004-2005), Senior Watch Officer in the Department’s Operations Center (2003-2004), and Deputy Principal Officer at U.S. Consulate Auckland, New Zealand (2000-2003). Mr. Young served as Political Officer at U.S. Embassy Rangoon, Burma (1997-2000), Political Economic Section Chief at U.S. Consulate General Bombay, India (1995-1997), and India and Bhutan Desk Officer in the Bureau of South Asian Affairs at the Department of State (1993-1995). He began his Foreign Service career in 1991 as Consular Officer at U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong.

Mr. Young earned an A.B. from the University of California Berkeley (ΦΒΚ) and an M.A. from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Bologna, Italy and Washington, D.C. He won the first Mark Palmer Award for the Advancement of Democracy and numerous Department of State performance awards. His languages are French, Italian and Korean.