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School Contact Information

Logo for Nishimachi International School

Nishimachi International School is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational day school founded in 1949 to serve as a center of education for expatriate and Japanese children. Nishimachi’s educational philosophy is grounded in a spirit of internationalism and humanism, which allows children to learn in a supportive environment. Nishimachi provides children with an education in English and a minimum of one lesson per day in Japanese, which seeks to develop international perspective and understanding. Japanese lessons occur daily.

Organization: The school is recognized as a private foundation by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government and has a seven-member board of directors and 15 trustee members. Nishimachi is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and by the Council of International Schools. The program extends from kindergarten through grade 9. The school year is divided into two academic semesters, beginning in late August and ending in June.

Curriculum: Students benefit from the school’s rigorous curriculum, close-knit community, and interactions with the local culture. Students are prepared to continue their education in first-class learning institutions around the world. As part of a community of learners, students are guided to take personal ownership of their learning, to make meaningful connections with others, to pursue challenges and persevere, to act ethically and respectfully, and to use multiple processes to think, innovate, and reflect. The school follows the U.S. Common Core and AERO frameworks and the U.S. Readers’ and Writers’ Workshop model. The following subjects make up the educational program: English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, Japanese language, Japanese social studies, art, music, physical education, and health and wellness. The Japanese language program is an essential element of the educational program for all students. Each student is assigned a Japanese language level ranging from beginners (non-native) to first language (native) level. A Japanese culture program enhances the learning of the language. An optional two-week summer school program is offered to Nishimachi students.

Faculty: In the 2020-2021 school year, there are 63 faculty members. Faculty members come to Nishimachi with an average of 8.7 years of teaching experience and remain at Nishimachi an average of seven years. Of the current staff, approximately 52 percent have advanced degrees.

Enrollment: At the beginning of the 2020-2021 school year, enrollment was 464 (K-grade 9), representing 38 countries. 

Facilities: The school is located in central Tokyo and comprises of seven buildings: the Matsukata House; the Ushiba Memorial gymnasium/auditorium; the kindergarten building in the Moto Azabu Hills complex; the primary building housing grades 1-2; the upper elementary building housing grades 3-5; the newly renovated middle school building housing grades 6-9; and the Yashiro Media Center. The Matsukata House, built in 1921 and a survivor of World War II, was the original family residence of Nishimachi’s founder and now serves as the main administrative building. Nishimachi’s outdoor education center, Camp Rioichiro Arai “Kazuno,” is located in Gunma Prefecture, 150 kilometres northwest of Tokyo.

Finances: In the 2020-2021 school year, the school’s operating income is derived from tuition and donations. Annual tuition rates, including an education enhancement fee and a school growth fund fee, are ¥2,772,000. The school charges a non-refundable ¥25,000 application fee. Once a student is admitted, the school charges a one-time only, non-refundable registration fee of ¥300,000 and a building fee of ¥675,000.

Information and statistics are current as of October 2020 and are provided by the school.

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