IV - General Assembly: Important Votes and Consensus Actions

Report
Bureau of International Organization Affairs
July 15, 2015


Public Law 101-246 calls for, with respect to plenary votes for the UN General Assembly, a listing of “votes on issues which directly affected important United States interests and on which the United States lobbied extensively.” An important basis for identifying issues is their consistency with the State Department’s Strategic Goals. For the 69th UN General Assembly (UNGA) in 2014, 13 votes and 20 consensus resolutions were identified for inclusion in this section.

Section IV contains three parts: (1) a listing and description of the 13 important UNGA votes; (2) a listing and description of the 20 important UNGA consensus resolutions; (3) voting coincidence percentages with the United States on these important actions that were adopted by votes, arranged alphabetically by country (with each country’s overall voting coincidence rate from Section III listed alongside the rate for important votes).

IMPORTANT VOTES

The following 13 important votes are identified by title, resolution number, date of vote, and results (Yes-No-Abstain), with the U.S. vote noted. For each vote, a short description of the issue and U.S. policy considerations is provided. Where available, hyperlinks to additional explanatory material, as well as official U.S. statements, are provided. The resolutions are listed chronologically. Full texts of all resolutions can or will be found on the United Nations website, at: http://www.un.org/en/ga/69/resolutions.shtml. In the left-hand column, all resolutions are listed numerically. Where underscored, resolution numbers are linked to their texts. (Some resolutions were not yet linked by the submission date of this report.)

1. Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba

A/Res/69/5 October 28 188-2(US)-3

The United States imposed an embargo on trade and financial transactions with Cuba in 1960, because of Fidel Castro’s repressive policies and expropriation of U.S. property without compensation. The United States strengthened the embargo in 1962, 1992, and 1996. UNGA has adopted a resolution condemning this embargo each year since 1992. The result on this vote was the same as the previous year; only Israel voted with the United States.

Web Resource: Explanation of Vote by Ambassador Ronald Godard

2. Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

A/Res/69/20 November 25 94-7(US)-56

The General Assembly established this Committee in 1975, and renews its support annually. The UNGA 69 vote had 16 fewer in favor than in UNGA 68.

Web Resource: Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

3. Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat

A/Res/69/21 November 25 91-7(US)-59

The General Assembly established the Division for Palestinian Rights in 1977. It renews its support annually. The resolution garnered 17 fewer affirmative votes in UNGA 69 than in UNGA 68.

Web Resource: Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat

4. The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation

A/Res/69/44 December 2 162(US)-1-17

Emphasized the significance of regional and international efforts to curb and prevent the proliferation of ballistic missile systems capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction. Recalled that the proliferation of ballistic missiles capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction constituted a threat to international peace and security. Called upon all states not yet subscribed to the Code of Conduct, in particular those possessing space launch vehicle- and ballistic missile capabilities, and those developing corresponding national programs, to do so. The United States co-sponsored this resolution. Iran cast the only “No” vote, and North Korea abstained.
Resource: Hague Code of Conduct against ballistic missile proliferation

5. United action towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons

A/Res/69/52 December 2 170(US)-1-14

Reaffirmed the importance for all states parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) to comply with their obligations under all Treaty articles. Urged all states that had not yet done so to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty at the earliest opportunity.

Condemned nuclear tests conducted by North Korea, including its use of ballistic missile technology and its continued development of nuclear and ballistic missile programs. The United States co-sponsored this resolution. North Korea cast the only “No” vote.

Resources: Statement by Ambassador Robert A. Wood (October 20); NPT

6. Comprehensive Nuclear Test- Ban Treaty (CTBT)

A/Res/69/81 December 2 179(US)-1-3

Stressed that a universal and effectively verifiable Treaty constituted a fundamental instrument in the field of nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. It is U.S. policy to seek Senate advice and consent for ratification of the Treaty. Though not a party to the CTBT, the United States has observed a self-imposed moratorium on nuclear testing since 1992, based on its own national security assessment. North Korea cast the sole “No” vote, while Syria abstained. The United States co-sponsored this resolution.

Resources: CTBT Fact Sheet; CTBT Treaty; Remarks by Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security Rose Gottemoeller (April 12)

7. Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories

A/Res/69/90 December 5 88-9(US)-79

The General Assembly established the Special Committee by Resolution 2443 (XXIII) in 1968. The United States believes that this committee embodies institutional discrimination against Israel, that it should be abolished, and actively lobbies other countries to withdraw their support for the annual resolution that renews the Committee’s mandate. The UNGA 69 resolution had seven fewer votes in favor, one more against, and four more abstentions than in UNGA 68.

Web Resources: UNGA media release on the Report of the Special Committee (GA/SPD/574); Resolution 2443 (XXIII)

8. Extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions

A/Res/69/182 December 18 122(US)-0-66

Demanded that all states ensure that extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions be ended and that they take effective action to prevent, combat and eliminate the practice in all its forms. Reiterated that all states must conduct prompt, exhaustive and impartial investigations into all suspected cases of extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, identify and bring to justice those responsible.
Resource: UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions

9. Situation of human rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

A/Res/69/188 December 18 116(US)-20-53

Condemned the long-standing and ongoing systematic, widespread and gross violations of human rights, including torture, rape, imposition of the death penalty for political and religious reasons, and collective punishments extending up to three generations. Also condemned the existence of an extensive system of political prison camps, where vast numbers of people are deprived of their liberty and subjected to deplorable conditions. Further decried a pervasive culture of impunity and a lack of accountability for human rights violations. The resolution had passed by consensus in UNGA 68.

Resources: Commission of inquiry on human rights in North Korea; Remarks by Ambassador Samantha Power (December 22)

10. Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic

A/Res/69/189 December 18 127(US)-13-48

The resolution strongly condemned, among other things, the Syrian regime’s use of chemical weapons, widespread and systematic gross violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms, and all violations of international humanitarian law.

Resources: Remarks by Ambassador Elizabeth Cousens (November 18); Statement by Ambassador Samantha Power (May 1)

11. Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

A/Res/69/190 December 18 83(US)-35-68

Expressed deep concern at serious ongoing and recurring human rights violations, including flogging, amputations and arbitrary executions. Decried continued harassment, intimidation, and arbitrary detention of Iranian citizens. Criticized continued harassment, and sometimes persecution of those belonging to recognized religious minorities, including Christians, Jews, Sufi Muslims, Sunni Muslims and Zoroastrians and their defenders. Particularly emphasized arbitrary arrest and detention of Sufi Muslims, Sunni Muslims, and evangelical Christians, including continued detention of Christian pastors.

The UNGA 69 vote showed slight change from UNGA 68: three fewer votes in favor, one fewer against, and seven additional abstentions.
Resource: 2013 Human Rights Report section on Iran

12. Entrepreneurship for development

A/Res/69/210 December 19 133(US)-30-7

Emphasized the need for improved regulatory environments and policy initiatives to promote entrepreneurship and foster small and medium-sized enterprises. Stressed entrepreneurship’s positive role in driving job creation. Emphasized the importance of private sector partnerships in promoting entrepreneurship, generating employment and investment, increasing revenue potential, and developing new technologies and innovative business models.
Resource: Remarks by Vice President Joe Biden (November 20)

13. Towards a New International Economic Order

A/Res/227 December 19 131-46(US)-3

Called for continued work toward a new international economic order based on the principles of equity, sovereign equality, interdependence, common interest, cooperation and solidarity among all states. Reaffirmed a need to enhance the voice and participation of developing countries in international economic decision-making and norm-setting. Declared international trade to be an engine for development and sustained economic growth, and reaffirmed the critical role that a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system can play in stimulating economic growth and development worldwide.

The United States voted against the resolution as being dated, divisive and counterproductive.
Resource: Explanation of vote by Counselor for Economic and Social Affairs Jill Derderian (November 20)

IMPORTANT CONSENSUS ACTIONS

The General Assembly approved the following resolutions by consensus. They have been chosen as indicative of important U.S. policy goals.

1. Measures to contain and combat the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa

A/Res/69/1 September 19

Expressed grave concern at the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and its unprecedented nature and scope, and at the rapid deterioration of the situation. Expressed deep concern about the potential reversal of the gains made by the affected countries in peacebuilding, political stability and the reconstruction of socioeconomic infrastructure in recent years.

Requested the Secretary-General to take necessary measures for the prompt execution of his intention to establish the UN Mission for Ebola Emergency Response. Called on all member states, relevant UN bodies, and the UN system to provide full support to the UN Mission.

Resources: Remarks by Ambassador Elizabeth Cousens (September 19); Remarks by Ambassador Samantha Power (October 30)

2. Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

A/Res/69/7 November 3

Termed the IAEA indispensable in encouraging and assisting the development and practical application of atomic energy for peaceful uses, in technology transfer to developing countries, and in nuclear safety, verification and security. Appealed to member states to continue to support IAEA activities.

Resources: IAEA; IAEA Annual Report

3. The Situation in Afghanistan

A/Res/69/18 November 20

Stressed the crucial importance of advancing regional cooperation to promote security, stability, and economic and social development in Afghanistan. Expressed deep concern over the high level of violence, especially the number of civilian casualties. Condemned all violent attacks, noting that the Taliban, Al-Qaida, and other violent and extremist groups and illegal armed groups were responsible for the significant majority of civilian casualties.

Pledged continued support to the Government and people of Afghanistan. Encouraged all partners to support the Kabul process constructively. Supported the continuing and growing ownership of reconstruction and development efforts by the Afghan government. Welcomed the presence of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and, until the end of 2014, the Operation Enduring Freedom coalition.

Resources: UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan; Remarks by Ambassador Samantha Power (December 18); UN media release (GA/11589); ISAF; Defense Department media release (December 28)

4. Measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction

A/Res/69/39 December 2

Expressed deep concern at the growing risk of linkages between terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, particularly the risk that terrorists may try to acquire such weapons. Exhorted member states to support international efforts to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery, and appealed to them to consider early accession to and ratification of the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism. Urged member states to take and strengthen national measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction, their means of delivery, and materials and technologies related to their manufacture. The United States co-sponsored this resolution.

Resource: Secretary-General’s report (A/69/138)

5. Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism

A/Res/69/127 December 10

Decried the persistence of terrorist acts worldwide, and condemned terrorist acts that caused enormous loss of human life, destruction and damage. Also condemned the atrocious and deliberate attacks against UN offices in various parts of the world. Condemned all acts, methods, and practices of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations as criminal and unjustifiable. Reiterated that criminal acts intended or calculated to provoke a state of terror for political purposes are unjustifiable.

Repeated its call for states to refrain from financing, encouraging, providing training for or otherwise supporting terrorist activities. Expressed concern at the increase in incidents of kidnapping and hostage-taking with demands for ransom and/or political concessions by terrorist groups.

Expressed grave concern over the acute and growing threat posed by foreign terrorist fighters, and emphasized the need for states to address this issue, including through the implementation of their international obligations. Called for all states to deny safe haven and bring to justice or, where appropriate, extradite the perpetrators of terrorist acts, as well as those who support, facilitate or participate or attempts to participate in financing, planning, or preparing terrorist acts.

Urged states to ensure that their nationals or other persons and entities within their territory that wilfully provide or collect funds for the benefit of those who commit, or attempt to commit, facilitate or participate in the commission of terrorist acts are punished by penalties consistent with the grave nature of such acts.

Resource: Remarks by Senior Advisor Carol Hamilton (October 7)

6. Intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls

A/Res/69/147 December 18

Condemned all acts of violence against women and girls, whether perpetrated by the government, by private persons, or by non-state actors, including business enterprises. Expressed deep concerned about the pervasiveness of violence against women and girls worldwide, and re-stated the need to intensify efforts to prevent all forms of violence against women and girls everywhere and to re-emphasize that violence against women and girls is unacceptable.

Urged states to continue to develop their national strategies, for example by ending impunity, ensuring that perpetrators of sexual and gender-based crimes against women and girls are punished under national and international law. Also stressed the need for the alleged perpetrators of such crimes to be held accountable by national or international justice systems.

Resources: Remarks by Secretary John Kerry (November 25); State Department Office of Global Women’s Issues

7. Intensification of efforts to eliminate obstetric fistula

A/Res/69/148 December 18

Expressed deep concern that, after 10 years and in spite of some progress, the Campaign to End Fistula still faced significant challenges, requiring intensification of efforts at all levels to end obstetric fistula.

Urged the international community to address the shortage of doctors and the inequitable distribution of midwives, nurses, and other health-care workers trained in lifesaving obstetric care. Called for states to make greater investments in strengthening health systems, ensuring adequately trained and skilled human resources, especially midwives, obstetricians, gynecologists, and doctors. Also called for states to provide funding for free or adequately subsidized maternal health-care and obstetric fistula repair and treatment services.

Resources: World Health Organization fact sheet; Remarks by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on obstetric fistula (May 23)

8. Trafficking in women and girls

A/Res/69/149 December 18

Expressed serious concern over the increasing number of women and girls being trafficked, including to developed countries, and that men and boys are also victims of trafficking, including for sexual exploitation.

Called for all governments to criminalize all forms of trafficking in persons, and to bring to justice and punish the offenders and intermediaries involved, including public officials involved with trafficking in persons.

Resources: State Department Trafficking in Persons Report 2014; Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially in women and children; Reports of the Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children

9. Intensifying global efforts for the elimination of female genital mutilations

A/Res/69/150 December 18

Voiced concern about evidence of an increase in female genital mutilations being carried out by medical personnel in all regions in which they are practiced. Also expressed concern that, despite the increase in national, regional and international efforts, the practice continued to persist in all regions of the world, and was often on the rise for migrant women and girls.

Urged states to condemn all harmful practices that affect women and girls, in particular female genital mutilations, wherever committed, and to take all necessary measures, especially through educational campaigns, including enacting and enforcing legislation, to prohibit female genital mutilations and to protect women and girls from this form of violence, and to hold perpetrators to account.

Resources: Testimony by Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women's Issues Catherine M. Russell (June 24); Fact Sheet on Gender-Based Violence Initiative

10. Child, early, and forced marriage

A/Res/69/156 December 18

Expressed deep concern about the continued prevalence of child, early and forced marriage worldwide, including the fact that approximately 15 million girls are married every year before they reach 18 years of age and that more than 700 million women and girls alive today were married before their 18th birthday. Urged all states to enact, enforce and uphold laws and policies aimed at preventing and ending child, early and forced marriage and protecting those at risk.

Noted with concern that child, early and forced marriage disproportionally affects girls with little or no formal education. Asserted that education is one of the most effective ways to prevent and end child, early, and forced marriage, and called on states to promote and protect the right of women and girls to education through enhanced emphasis on quality education, including catch-up and literacy education for those who have not received formal education.

Resources: Remarks by Assistant Secretary of State Anne C. Richard (November 18); Remarks by Under Secretary of State Sarah Sewall (November 10)

11. Combating intolerance, negative stereotyping, stigmatization, discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against persons, based on religion or belief

A/Res. 69/174 December 18

Expressed concern that the number of incidents of religious intolerance, discrimination, and related violence, as well as of negative stereotyping of individuals on the basis of religion or belief, continued to rise around the world. Condemned any advocacy of religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence by any means.

Called for states, among many things, to speak out against intolerance, including advocacy of religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence, and to adopt measures to criminalize incitement to imminent violence based on religion or belief. Further called for all states to adopt measures and policies to promote full respect for and protection of places of worship and religious sites, cemeteries, and shrines, and to take protective measures in cases where they are vulnerable to vandalism or destruction.

Resource: Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights: Combating discrimination based on religion or belief

12. Freedom of Religion or Belief

A/Res/69/175 December 18

Strongly condemned violations of freedom of thought, conscience, and religion or belief, as well as all forms of intolerance, discrimination, and violence based on religion or belief. Evinced deep concern at increasing acts of discrimination, intolerance and violence directed against members of many religious communities in various parts of the world.

Strongly condemned violence and acts of terrorism, increasing in number and intensity, targeting individuals, including persons belonging to religious minorities, on the basis of or in the name of religion or belief. Strongly condemned any advocacy of hatred based on religion or belief constituting incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence.

Recalled that states have an obligation to exercise due diligence to prevent, investigate and punish acts of violence against those belonging to religious minorities, regardless of the perpetrator, and that failure to do so may constitute a human rights violation.

Resource: Statement by Ambassador Samantha Power (January 16)

13. Information and communications technologies for development

A/Res/69/204 December 19

Stressed that, for the majority of the poor, the development promise of science and technology, remained unfulfilled, and emphasized the need to harness technology effectively, including information and communications technologies (ICT), to bridge the digital divide. Also stressed the important role of governments in the effective use of ICT in formulating public policies, and in the provision of public services to support national development efforts. Further stressed the important role played by private sector, civil society, and technical communities in ICT. Recognized the need to harness the potential of ICT as critical enablers of sustainable development.

Resource: Remarks by Terri Robl, U.S. Deputy Representative to ECOSOC (October 14)

14. Implementation of Agenda 21, the Program for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development and of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development

A/Res/69/214 December 19

Recognized eradicating poverty, changing unsustainable and promoting sustainable patterns of consumption and production and protecting and managing the natural resource base of economic and social development as overarching objectives of and essential requirements for sustainable development.

Reaffirmed its commitment to implement Agenda 21, the Program for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, including the time-bound goals and targets, and the other internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals, as well as the outcome document of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development.

Resource: Explanation of Position by Ambassador Elizabeth Cousens (July 22)

15. Protection of global climate for present and future generations of humankind

A/Res/69/220 December 19

Reaffirmed climate change as one of the greatest current challenges, and emphasized that adaptating to climate change represented an immediate, urgent global priority. Expressed profound alarm that emissions of greenhouse gases continued to rise globally. Remained deeply concerned that all countries, particularly developing countries, were vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change.

Resource: UN Environment Program’s Climate Change resources

16. Situation of human rights in Myanmar [Burma]

A/Res/69/248 December 29

Welcomed continued positive developments in Myanmar toward political and economic reform, democratization and national reconciliation, and the promotion and protection of human rights. Recognized the scale of the reform effort, and encouraged the Government of Myanmar to take further steps to consolidate the progress made.

Urged the Government of Myanmar to step up efforts to end remaining human rights violations and abuses, including arbitrary arrest and detention, forced displacement, rape and other forms of sexual violence, torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, arbitrary deprivation of property, including land, and violations of international humanitarian law in some parts of the country, and repeated its call for the government to take necessary measures to ensure accountability and end impunity. Expressed concern about anti-Muslim violence and the situation of the Rohingya minority, and urged the government to establish without delay an Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights office in the country.

Resources: Remarks by Deputy Representative to ECOSOC Terri Robl (November 24); Remarks by Senior Advisor Carol Hamilton (October 28)

17. UN common system

A/Res/69/251 December 29

The General Assembly authorized the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) to continue the pay freeze currently in effect for professional staff at least through the end of 2016. A benefits freeze also remains in effect during 2015 while the ICSC undertakes a comprehensive review of the UN’s compensation practices.

18. Report on the activities of the Office of Internal Oversight Services

A/Res/69/252 December 29

The General Assembly authorized the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) to publicly disclose audit and evaluation reports on its website on a permanent basis, effective January 1, 2015.

Resource for Res. 252, 263, and 264: UNGA media release (GA/AB/4144)

19. Program budget for the biennium 2014-2015

A/Res/69/263 December 29

Adopted a $5.65-billion budget to finance UN activities in 2014-2015, an increase of 2.2 percent compared to the initial budget level adopted in 2013.

20. Proposed program budget for the biennium 2016-2017

A/Res/69/264 December 29

The General Assembly adopted a budget outline for 2016-2017 that is 1.6 percent less than the revised 2014-2015 level. This continues to limit the trajectory of growth in the regular budget.

IMPORTANT VOTES: COMPARISON WITH UNITED STATES

The table that follows summarizes UN member state performance at the 69th General Assembly in comparison with the United States on 13 important votes. This table shows how each member voted for each of the 13 resolutions. For comparison, each country’s overall coincidence rate with U.S. voting is listed alongside the rate for the important votes.

The table is alphabetical by country. Each vote is listed in the table by the number assigned to it below.

Key:

S = Same as U.S. Vote; O = Opposite of U.S. Vote; A = Abstained; X = Absent

1. Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba A/Res/69/5

2. Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People A/Res/69/20

3. Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat A/Res/69/21

4. The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation A/Res/69/44

5. United action towards total elimination of nuclear weapons A/Res/69/52

6. Comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty (CTBT) A/Res/69/81

7. Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories A/Res/69/90

8. Extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions A/Res/69/182

9. Situation of human rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea A/Res/69/188

10. Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic A/Res/69/189

11. Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran A/Res/69/190

12. Entrepreneurship for development A/Res/69/210

13. Towards a New International Economic Order A/Res/69/227

COUNTRY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

COINCIDENCE:
IMPORTANT
VOTES ONLY

COINCIDENCE:
ALL VOTES

Afghanistan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

S

S

O

O

O

41.7%

36.1%

Albania

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

61.6%

Algeria

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

O

O

25.0%

35.4%

Andorra

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

64.7%

Angola

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

35.8%

Antigua and Barbuda

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

A

A

S

O

50.0%

36.7%

Argentina

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

66.7%

40.5%

Armenia

O

O

A

S

S

S

O

S

S

A

O

S

O

54.5%

35.3%

Australia

O

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

92.3%

75.0%

Austria

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

58.1%

Azerbaijan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

X

X

S

X

S

O

50.0%

35.5%

Bahamas

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

66.7%

40.2%

Bahrain

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

S

S

A

O

O

40.0%

36.6%

Bangladesh

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

O

O

O

30.0%

36.9%

Barbados

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

S

O

61.5%

40.0%

Belarus

O

X

X

S

S

S

X

S

O

O

O

S

O

50.0%

33.3%

Belgium

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

62.0%

Belize

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

S

O

61.5%

39.0%

Benin

O

O

O

S

S

S

X

S

S

S

A

S

O

63.6%

42.1%

Bhutan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

A

A

S

O

54.5%

33.3%

Bolivia

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

O

O

O

S

O

45.5%

32.5%

Bosnia/ Herzegovina

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

58.9%

Botswana

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

A

S

S

S

S

O

63.6%

38.3%

Brazil

O

O

O

A

A

S

O

S

S

S

A

S

O

50.0%

37.3%

Brunei Darussalam

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

O

O

O

30.0%

37.3%

Bulgaria

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

62.7%

Burkina Faso

O

O

O

S

S

S

X

A

S

S

A

S

O

60.0%

38.0%

Burundi

O

X

X

X

X

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

O

57.1%

25.9%

Cabo Verde

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

S

O

72.7%

41.6%

Cambodia

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

X

O

S

O

45.5%

36.1%

Cameroon

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

A

A

S

A

S

O

71.4%

38.8%

Canada

O

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

92.3%

83.1%

Central African Rep.

O

A

A

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

S

O

72.7%

43.6%

Chad

O

X

X

S

S

S

X

A

S

A

X

O

O

57.1%

45.3%

Chile

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

S

O

61.5%

40.7%

China

O

O

O

A

A

S

O

A

O

O

O

A

O

11.1%

35.9%

Colombia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

40.0%

Comoros

O

X

X

X

S

X

X

A

A

S

O

X

X

50.0%

57.5%

Congo

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

34.6%

Costa Rica

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

66.7%

40.5%

Côte d’Ivoire

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

A

S

O

77.8%

46.4%

Croatia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

X

O

77.8%

60.6%

Cuba

O

O

O

A

A

S

O

S

O

O

O

O

O

18.2%

24.3%

Cyprus

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

75.0%

58.7%

Czech Republic

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

65.3%

DPR of Korea

O

O

O

A

O

O

O

A

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

15.9%

Dem. Rep. of Congo

O

X

X

X

X

X

X

A

A

A

A

S

O

33.3%

11.1%

Denmark

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

63.5%

Djibouti

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

S

S

A

O

O

45.5%

38.1%

Dominica

O

X

X

X

X

X

X

S

S

S

S

X

X

80.0%

41.2%

Dominican Republic

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

S

A

S

O

54.5%

38.8%

Ecuador

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

O

O

O

A

O

33.3%

30.0%

Egypt

O

O

O

A

A

S

O

A

O

S

O

O

O

20.0%

28.0%

El Salvador

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

A

A

S

O

60.0%

37.0%

Equatorial Guinea

O

X

X

X

S

S

X

A

X

X

X

X

X

66.7%

40.0%

Eritrea

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

A

A

O

S

O

50.0%

30.7%

Estonia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

65.7%

Ethiopia

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

A

A

A

A

S

O

50.0%

38.0%

Fiji

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

A

A

A

S

O

71.4%

38.0%

Finland

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

61.6%

France

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

76.1%

Gabon

O

O

O

X

X

X

X

A

A

S

A

X

X

25.0%

16.7%

Gambia

O

X

X

X

X

X

O

A

O

S

A

S

O

33.3%

12.9%

Georgia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

X

S

S

88.9%

61.2%

Germany

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

64.9%

Ghana

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

S

X

A

S

O

75.0%

42.5%

Greece

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

60.3%

Grenada

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

A

S

O

70.0%

42.3%

Guatemala

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

40.2%

Guinea

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

S

O

50.0%

37.8%

Guinea-Bissau

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

A

S

O

70.0%

41.6%

Guyana

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

37.0%

Haiti

O

X

X

S

S

S

X

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

49.3%

Honduras

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

44.0%

Hungary

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

65.7%

Iceland

O

O

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

81.8%

62.2%

India

O

O

O

A

A

A

O

S

A

A

O

S

O

25.0%

26.5%

Indonesia

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

A

S

O

O

O

30.0%

33.8%

Iran

O

O

O

O

S

S

O

A

O

O

O

X

O

10.0%

20.0%

Iraq

O

O

O

S

A

S

O

A

S

A

O

O

O

36.4%

36.9%

Ireland

O

A

A

X

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

88.9%

65.6%

Israel

S

S

S

S

A

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

93.3%

Italy

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

62.7%

Jamaica

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

A

S

O

58.3%

39.3%

Japan

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

63.0%

Jordan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

S

S

A

O

O

45.5%

37.3%

Kazakhstan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

S

A

O

S

O

45.5%

38.6%

Kenya

O

X

X

S

S

S

X

A

A

A

A

S

O

66.7%

43.1%

Kiribati

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

42.7%

Kuwait

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

O

O

33.3%

34.6%

Kyrgyzstan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

36.7%

Laos

O

O

O

X

S

S

O

A

O

A

A

X

O

25.0%

31.6%

Latvia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

65.7%

Lebanon

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

S

S

A

O

O

O

36.4%

32.1%

Lesotho

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

A

A

X

A

X

O

50.0%

34.8%

Liberia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

A

S

S

S

X

O

75.0%

41.3%

Libya

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

X

O

44.4%

38.3%

Liechtenstein

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

59.5%

Lithuania

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

65.7%

Luxembourg

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

61.8%

Madagascar

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

A

S

S

X

X

O

71.4%

50.8%

Malawi

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

A

S

S

S

S

O

77.8%

40.0%

Malaysia

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

O

O

40.0%

38.1%

Maldives

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

A

O

O

50.0%

37.3%

Mali

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

A

A

A

O

44.4%

35.8%

Malta

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

S

S

75.0%

56.6%

Marshall Islands

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

O

91.7%

68.1%

Mauritania

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

A

X

66.7%

38.9%

Mauritius

O

O

O

S

A

A

O

S

S

S

A

A

O

44.4%

33.3%

Mexico

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

66.7%

41.0%

Micronesia

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

O

91.7%

87.3%

Monaco

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

70.3%

Mongolia

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

X

S

A

S

O

75.0%

40.2%

Montenegro

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

59.5%

Morocco

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

S

S

A

O

O

45.5%

37.0%

Mozambique

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

36.6%

Myanmar (Burma)

O

O

O

S

A

S

O

S

O

A

O

S

O

36.4%

34.6%

Namibia

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

37.0%

Nauru

O

X

X

X

X

X

S

X

S

S

A

X

X

75.0%

81.8%

Nepal

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

A

A

S

O

50.0%

36.6%

Netherlands

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

63.5%

New Zealand

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

58.6%

Nicaragua

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

O

O

O

O

33.3%

28.2%

Niger

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

37.3%

Nigeria

O

O

O

S

S

S

X

A

A

A

A

S

O

50.0%

38.3%

Norway

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

62.5%

Oman

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

O

S

O

O

O

27.3%

33.3%

Pakistan

O

O

O

A

A

S

O

A

A

A

O

O

O

12.5%

29.6%

Palau

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

X

O

90.9%

90.3%

Panama

O

A

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

O

81.8%

46.2%

Papua New Guinea

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

A

S

O

77.8%

44.6%

Paraguay

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

48.6%

Peru

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

41.5%

Philippines

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

A

A

S

O

60.0%

37.8%

Poland

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

63.9%

Portugal

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

63.9%

Qatar

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

O

O

40.0%

35.0%

Republic of Korea

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

A

88.9%

66.7%

Republic of Moldova

O

A

A

S

S

X

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

88.9%

62.3%

Romania

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

63.4%

Russia

O

A

A

S

A

S

A

S

O

O

O

X

O

28.6%

43.9%

Rwanda

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

S

A

A

S

O

75.0%

40.8%

St. Kitts and Nevis

O

X

X

S

S

S

X

S

A

S

S

X

O

75.0%

46.8%

Saint Lucia

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

37.0%

St. Vincent/ Grenadines

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

A

A

A

S

O

62.5%

37.5%

Samoa

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

42.5%

San Marino

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

58.1%

Sao Tome/ Principe

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

X

X

77.8%

44.1%

Saudi Arabia

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

O

O

33.3%

31.6%

Senegal

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

S

O

50.0%

38.6%

Serbia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

57.5%

Seychelles

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

S

S

O

61.5%

39.0%

Sierra Leone

O

O

O

X

X

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

O

50.0%

25.0%

Singapore

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

A

A

S

O

50.0%

39.8%

Slovak Republic

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

63.0%

Slovenia

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

61.3%

Solomon Islands

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

S

S

S

O

58.3%

37.8%

Somalia

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

A

S

O

58.3%

36.3%

South Africa

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

A

A

A

O

44.4%

37.0%

South Sudan

O

X

X

X

X

X

A

S

S

A

S

X

X

75.0%

33.3%

Spain

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

62.5%

Sri Lanka

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

O

A

O

A

O

30.0%

29.9%

Sudan

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

A

O

A

O

O

O

33.3%

34.6%

Suriname

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

35.8%

Swaziland

O

X

X

S

S

S

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

75.0%

55.8%

Sweden

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

58.9%

Switzerland

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

58.1%

Syria

O

O

O

A

A

A

O

A

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

17.9%

Tajikistan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

O

S

O

40.0%

30.7%

Thailand

O

O

O

S

S

S

X

S

S

S

A

S

O

63.6%

40.5%

TFYR Macedonia

O

X

X

S

S

S

X

X

S

S

S

X

X

85.7%

71.4%

Timor-Leste

O

X

X

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

O

80.0%

40.0%

Togo

O

O

A

S

S

S

A

S

A

A

A

S

O

62.5%

39.4%

Tonga

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

A

A

A

A

S

A

80.0%

46.9%

Trinidad and Tobago

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

A

S

S

S

O

58.3%

39.3%

Tunisia

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

A

O

O

50.0%

35.4%

Turkey

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

S

S

X

O

A

54.5%

54.7%

Turkmenistan

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

S

A

A

O

X

X

57.1%

32.8%

Tuvalu

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

S

S

S

S

O

58.3%

31.9%

Uganda

O

X

X

S

A

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

50.0%

34.8%

Ukraine

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

X

X

87.5%

64.2%

United Arab Emirates

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

S

S

A

O

O

40.0%

37.3%

United Kingdom

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

90.0%

78.9%

United Rep. of Tanzania

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

44.4%

34.6%

Uruguay

O

O

O

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

A

S

O

63.6%

38.6%

Uzbekistan

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

A

O

O

O

X

O

27.3%

26.2%

Vanuatu

O

A

A

S

S

S

A

X

S

S

S

S

O

77.8%

46.9%

Venezuela

O

O

O

S

S

S

O

S

O

O

O

O

X

33.3%

28.2%

Vietnam

O

O

O

X

S

S

O

S

O

A

O

S

O

36.4%

33.8%

Yemen

O

O

O

A

S

S

O

A

A

S

A

O

O

33.3%

32.5%

Zambia

O

X

X

S

S

S

O

A

A

A

A

S

O

57.1%

37.5%

Zimbabwe

O

O

O

S

A

S

O

A

O

O

O

X

O

20.0%

25.0%

Overall Percentages

                         

62.4%

44.6%