Andorra

10. Political and Security Environment

Andorra has not experienced any politically motivated damage to projects or installations, or destruction of private property. There are no nascent insurrections, belligerent neighbors, or other politically motivated activities. The likelihood of widespread civil disturbances is very low. Civil unrest is generally not a problem in Andorra. No anti-American sentiment is evident in the country.

11. Labor Policies and Practices

All employees wishing to work in Andorra must have work permits, issued by annual quotas established by the government. The tourism sector is the largest labor sector.

The Andorran constitution recognizes workers’ rights to form trade unions to defend their economic and social interests. Alternative dispute mechanisms such as mediation and arbitration do exist. Despite these rights, union membership is relatively low.

Andorra is not a member of the International Labor Organization (ILO).

There were a total of 42,931 employed workers in Andorra in December 2021. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the unemployment rate increased from 1.8 percent in 2019 to 3 percent in 2020 but improved to 2.2 percent as of the fourth quarter of 2021. The government of Andorra approved a 3.3 percent increase in the minimum wage that went into effect January 1, 2022, bringing it to 6.68 euros (roughly USD 7.40) per hour and 1,158 euros (roughly USD 1,283) per month.

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