Peru

1. Openness To, and Restrictions Upon, Foreign Investment

Policies Towards Foreign Direct Investment

The GOP seeks to attract investment — both foreign and domestic — in nearly all sectors of the economy.  The GOP prioritized USD 10.3 billion in public-private partnership projects in transportation infrastructure, electricity, mining, broadband expansion, gas distribution, health and sanitation for 2019-2021.  The Ministry of Energy and Mines aims to spur exploration and investment in the mining sector, increase oil and gas exploration, and modernize the Talara refinery.

The 1993 Constitution grants national treatment for foreign investors and permits foreign investment in almost all economic sectors.  Under the Constitution, foreign investors have the same rights as national investors to benefit from investment incentives, such as tax exemptions.  In addition to the 1993 Constitution, Peru has several laws governing foreign direct investment (FDI) including the Foreign Investment Promotion Law (Legislative Decree (DL) 662 of September 1991) and the Framework Law for Private Investment Growth (DL 757 of November 1991).  Other important laws include the Private Investment in State-Owned Enterprises Promotion Law (DL 674), the Private Investment in Public Services Infrastructure Promotion Law (DL 758), and specific laws related to agriculture, fisheries and aquaculture, forestry, mining, oil and gas, and electricity.  Article 6 of Supreme Decree No. 162-92-EF (the implementing regulations of DLs 662 and 757) authorizes private investors to enter all industries except investments in natural protected areas and manufacturing of weapons.

Peruvians and Americans benefit from the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (PTPA), which entered into force on February 1, 2009.  The PTPA established a secure, predictable legal framework for U.S. investors operating in Peru. The PTPA protects all forms of investment. U.S. investors enjoy the right to establish, acquire, and operate investments in Peru on an equal footing with local investors in almost all circumstances.

The GOP created ProInversion, in 2002, based on an existing, similar investment promotion agency.  ProInversion has completed both privatizations and concessions of state-owned enterprises and natural resource-based industries.  The agency regularly organizes international roadshow events, including in the United States, to attract investors and manages the GOP’s public-private investment project portfolio.  Major recent concession areas include ports, water treatment plants, power generation facilities, mining projects, electrical transmission lines, oil and gas distribution, and telecommunications.  Project opportunities are available on ProInversion’s Project Portfolio page at: http://www.proyectosapp.pe/modulos/JER/PlantillaProyectoEstadoSector.aspx?are=1&prf=2&jer=5892&sec=30  .

The GOP passed legislative decrees in July 2018 to attract and facilitate investment.  These include measures to reform the public-private partnership (PPP) process. The reforms establish the Economy and Finance Ministry (MEF) as the PPP policymaking authority in the country and allows government entities to contract out PMO services throughout all stages of the PPP process, including through the GOP promotion investment agency Proinversion. The regulations also established that Proinversion’s board of directors will be composed of GOP Ministers, reversing an earlier decree that allowed for two private sector representatives on the board. The GOP established an investment research portal within the invierte.pe public investment online database (https://www.mef.gob.pe/es/aplicativos-invierte-pe?id=5455).  While ProInversion does not maintain an ongoing dialogue with investors, it has authority to oversee PPP investments throughout their lifecycles. The GOP plans to publish a National Infrastructure Plan in July 2019, with infrastructure projects keyed to critical sectors outlined in a National Competitveness Plan that will be published by the end of 2019.

To spur project financing, the GOP loosened banking regulations to enable an entity to operate more than one tier-one financial institution in the country.  A new Tourism Entrepreneurship Fund created in 2017 will provide grants to finance or co-finance business ventures that incorporate conservation, sustainable use, and economic development in the tourism industry. The GOP later developed a four-year Tourism Entrepreneurship Program to channel the USD 3 million fund to tourism ventures (http://turismoemprende.pe/  ).  The program aims to fund 24 new tourism ventures worth USD 450,000 in 2018.

Although all Peruvian administrations since the 1990s have vowed to support private investment and abide by Peruvian laws, the GOP occasionally passes measures that some observers regard as a contravention of Peru’s open investment laws.  Furthermore, the GOP in December 2011 signed into law a 10-year moratorium on the entry into Peru of live genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to be used for cultivation. Peru also implemented two sets of rules for importing pesticides, one for commercial importers, which requires importers to file a full dossier with technical information, and another for end-user farmers, which only requires a written affidavit.

Limits on Foreign Control and Right to Private Ownership and Establishment

The Constitution (Article 6 under Supreme Decree No. 162-92-EF) authorizes foreign investors to carry out any economic activity provided investors comply with all constitutional precepts, laws, and treaties.  Exceptions exist, including exclusion of foreign investment activities in natural protected reserves and manufacturing of military weapons, pursuant to Article 6 of Legislative Decree No. 757. While long-term concessions are granted, the law states Peruvians must maintain majority ownership in certain strategic sectors:  media; air, land and maritime transportation infrastructure; and private security surveillance services.

Prior approval is required in the banking and defense-related sectors.  Foreigners are legally prohibited from owning a majority interest in radio and television stations in Peru; nevertheless, foreigners have in practice owned controlling interests in such companies.  Under the Constitution, foreign interests cannot “acquire or possess under any title, mines, lands, forests, waters, or fuel or energy sources” within 50 kilometers of Peru’s international borders. However, foreigners can obtain concessions and rights within the restricted areas with the authorization of a supreme resolution approved by the Cabinet and the Joint Command of the Armed Forces.

The GOP does not screen, review, or approve foreign direct investment outside of those sectors that require a governmental waiver.

Other Investment Policy Reviews

The World Trade Organization (WTO) published a Trade Policy Review on Peru in 2013.  The WTO commented that foreign investors receive the same legal treatment as local investors in general, although foreign investment on maritime services, air transport, and broadcasting is restricted.  The report also noted that the Peruvian government promotes public-private partnerships to build infrastructure and spur economic growth, with tax exemptions and low-cost financing available for domestic and foreign investors alike.

Report available at: https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tpr_e/tp389_e.htm  

Peru aspires to become a member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).  Peru launched an OECD Country Program on December 8, 2014, comprising policy reviews and capacity building projects, and allowing it to participate in substantive work of OECD’s specialized committees.  An 18-month OECD review identified economic, social, and political obstacles that could hamper Peru’s OECD membership aspirations. The government noted that the study would act as a “roadmap” for Peru’s goal to achieve membership by 2021.  The OECD published the Initial Assessment of its Multi-Dimensional Review of Peru in October 2015, finding that in spite of economic growth, Peru “still faces structural challenges to escape the middle-income trap and consolidate its emerging middle class.”  In every year since this study was published, Peru has enacted and implemented dozens of governance reforms to modernize its governance practices in line with OECD recommendations.

Report: www.oecd.org/countries/peru/multi-dimensional-review-of-peru-9789264243279-en.htm  

Peru has not had any third-party investment policy review (IPR) through the OECD, WTO, or UNCTAD in the past three years.

Business Facilitation

The GOP does not have a regulatory system to facilitate business operations but the Competition and Consumer Protection Agency (INDECOPI) regulates the enactment of new regulations by government entities that can place burdens on business operations.  INDECOPI’s authority allowing it to block any new business regulations can limit restrictions of businesses. In addition, the GOP passed in 2016 a “sunset law” that requires a review of existing regulations by government agencies.

Peru allows foreign business ownership, provided that a company has at least two shareholders and that its legal representative is a Peruvian resident.  The process takes an average of 43 days and involves 11 procedures. An entrepreneur must reserve the company name through the national registry, SUNARP (www.sunarp.gob.pe  ), and prepare a deed of incorporation through Portal de Servicios al Ciudadano y a las Empresas (http://www.serviciosalciudadano.gob.pe/  ).  The deed is then signed and filed with a Public Notary, with notary fees of up to 1 percent of a company’s capital, before submission to the Public Registry.  The company’s legal representative must obtain a Certificate of Registration and tax identification number from the National Tax Authority. Finally, the company must obtain a license from the municipality of the jurisdiction in which it is located.

All foreign investments must be registered with ProInversion.  The agency helps potential investors navigate investment regulations and provides sector-specific information on the investment process.

Outward Investment

The GOP promotes outward investment by Peruvian entities through the Ministry of Foreign Trade and Tourism (MINCETUR).  Trade Commission Offices of Peru (OCEX’s), under the supervision of Peru’s export promotion agency (PromPeru) are located in numerous countries, including the United States, and promote the export of Peruvian goods and services and inward foreign investment.  The GOP does not restrict domestic investors from investing abroad.

Investment Climate Statements
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