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Afghanistan

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Albania

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Algeria

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Andorra

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Angola

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Antigua and Barbuda

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Argentina

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person Including Freedom from:

Armenia

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Australia

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Austria

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Azerbaijan

Section 1. Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom from:

Politically Motivated Reprisal against Individuals Located Outside the Country

There were reports of government abuse of international law enforcement tools, such as those of Interpol (the International Criminal Police Organization), in attempts to detain foreign residents who were activists. There also were reports that the government targeted dissidents and journalists who lived outside of the country through kidnappings, digital harassment, and intimidation of family members who remained in the country.

In January authorities in Gdansk, Poland, detained Dashgyn Agalarli, an Azerbaijani national with refugee status in Norway, reportedly due to an Interpol notice submitted by the Azerbaijan government. He was held for three days and then released on bail. According to news reports in September, however, he remained in Poland and was unable to leave the country.

In December 2019 the State Migration Service reported that political emigrant and government critic Elvin Isayev was deported to Azerbaijan from Ukraine and arrested upon arrival. According to RFE/RL, Ukraine’s State Migration Service and Prosecutor General’s Office denied having ordered his deportation. Isayev was charged with incitement to riot and for open calls for action against the state. On September 8, the Prosecutor General’s Office alleged that seven other political emigrants residing in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Switzerland participated in these criminal acts, together with Isayev. On the basis of the Prosecutor General’s Office’s petition, the Nasimi District Court ordered the arrest of all seven emigrants. The emigrants subject to this order included Ordukhan Babirov, Tural Sadigli, Gurban Mammadov, Orkhan Agayev, Rafael Piriyev, Ali Hasanaliyev, and Suleyman Suleymanli. The Prosecutor General’s Office stated that it requested an international search for these individuals from Interpol. On October 30, the Baku Court on Grave Crimes convicted and sentenced Elvin Isayev to eight years in prison.

Human Rights Reports
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U.S. Department of State

The Lessons of 1989: Freedom and Our Future