Introduction

This report is provided in response to the Assessing Progress in Haiti Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-162) (“the Act”), which directed the Secretary of State to submit to Congress an annual report on the status of post-earthquake recovery and development in Haiti. The Department of State, in cooperation with other U.S. government agencies, is submitting the report to the Committee on Foreign Affairs; the Committee on Appropriations; and the Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs of the House of Representatives, and to the Committee on Foreign Relations; the Committee on Appropriations; and the Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs of the Senate. In view of the scope of information sought by the Act, this report is broken into multiple attachments, some of which are in tabular form. Their contents are listed in Attachment A.

It is now almost eight years since a devastating earthquake hit Haiti January 12, 2010. U.S. assistance has shifted from disaster relief to long-term reconstruction and development efforts focused on advancing economic opportunities and job creation, increasing access to basic services, enhancing basic sanitation and safe water access to reduce the spread of cholera and other diseases, building capacity of government institutions, improving the quality of basic education, bolstering the security sector, strengthening neighborhood development, and promoting a Haitian-led approach to food security. The U.S. government committed $3.4 billion to these aid efforts, with 98 percent of those funds obligated and 88 percent disbursed as of June 2017. In November 2016, Haiti successfully completed its electoral process and the Moise administration took incremental steps to maintain macroeconomic stability in 2017. Furthermore, there has been progress in the four core pillars of the U.S. government’s “Post‑Earthquake Haiti Strategy: Toward Renewal and Economic Opportunity” – infrastructure and energy, food and economic security, health and other basic services, and governance and rule of law.

To serve as effective development partners, Haitian officials must be backed by strong and legitimate political institutions. From 2013 through early 2016, lack of consensus among Haiti’s political elites impeded progress toward timely and credible elections. On November 20, 2016, Jovenel Moise was elected president in the first round with 55 percent of the vote. The subsequent round of nationwide elections in January 2017 elected Haiti’s parliament, town halls, and local councils. For the first time since 2006, Haitians are represented at each level of government by elected officials.

Even as it faces some opposition, the Moise administration has moved forward with its agenda, prioritizing infrastructure development, economic growth, and energy creation. It has been a strong partner in the smooth repatriation from the United States of more than 5,000 Haitian migrants. In the near term, Haiti would benefit from reaching a political consensus to hold its next legislative elections and establish a permanent electoral council (CEP) to avoid repeating the electoral dysfunction from which the country just emerged. The legislative and judicial branches have made some progress toward selecting members, and the government is working towards establishing a CEP. The transition from the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) to the much smaller UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH) places a larger burden of responsibility for providing security on the shoulders of the Haitian police force. The Haitian National Police (HNP) managed to provide general security in its first real test – a series of sometimes-violent street protests in autumn of 2017 – with professionalism and restraint. While these protests were relatively small in scale, the Government of Haiti will need to continue building the capacity of the HNP. The HNP’s performance in managing 2017 protests is an encouraging sign as Haiti aims to strengthen its democratic institutions.

The United States spent approximately $33 million on electoral assistance leading up to the successful 2015-2017 electoral cycle, training election officials and observers, and providing logistical aid with the transport of officials, ballots, and equipment. As part of this assistance, working with USAID, the National Democratic Institute and the International Foundation for Electoral Systems spent approximately $12 million in U.S. government funds from 2013 to 2017 to make the electoral process more transparent and equitable through civic engagement to boost voter turnout, capacity building for Haitian election monitors, and work with civic organizations to deter electoral violence. In addition, the United States provided $2 million to the OAS for its electoral observation mission, and approximately $5 million to the UN Office of Project Services to support electoral logistics. Additional information about U.S. assistance initiatives related to good governance can be found in Attachment I.

In the area of Infrastructure and Energy, the Caracol Industrial Park (CIP) marked five years of operations in 2017 and serves as a model public-private partnership in northern Haiti, attracting new tenants and creating additional jobs. The number of employees and contractors at CIP grew to close to 12,900 as of September 2017, up from 10,393 in September 2016. To spur further CIP expansion, the Government of Haiti, USAID, and the International Finance Corporation moved forward with the improvement of the nearby port at Cap-Haitien. With USAID assistance, the Government of Haiti is preparing to award a new contract for port operations and management. The procurement process is in the final stages and the Government of Haiti projects it will sign an agreement in early 2018. USAID’s procurement process for the design/build work is also in the final stages and a contract award is planned in 2018 with an anticipated 30-month design/build period. USAID is also helping to train officials to ensure more efficient customs functions and transparent port regulatory operations.

U.S. shelter assistance is focused on cost-effective ways to increase durable housing stock, building on private construction and repair efforts by increasing low- and medium-income access to capital. With the assistance of the U.S. government through USAID, the Government of Haiti’s social housing unit is taking on greater responsibility for community development, including the cleaning and maintenance of common areas, drainage, and solid waste removal. The electric power plant built to supply energy to the CIP also provides power 24 hours per day to more than 10,000 residents and businesses in surrounding areas. For the customers provided with proper drops and meters, the collection rate has remained constant at around 80 percent. Additional information about the progress of U.S. efforts to expand the industrial park, energy, housing, and ports can be found in Attachment E.

In the area of Food and Economic Security, U.S. government assistance has helped Haitian farmers by increasing productivity, improving watershed management and irrigation systems, and directly linking the buyers and sellers of agricultural products. Approximately 80,000 farmer households have more than doubled their incomes as beneficiaries of USAID’s Feed the Future initiative. Because most job growth comes from small businesses, USAID’s Local Enterprise and Value Chain Enhancement program has provided technical assistance and business development services that strengthened management and improved product quality for more than 1,000 micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises. In addition, the Leveraging Effective Application of Direct Investments program helped attract investment through matching grants. Via the work of the Department of the Treasury, the United States also helped the Government of Haiti consolidate financial accounts and increase transparency and revenue generation. Attachment L provides additional information about U.S. food security initiatives, and Attachment J elaborates on U.S. engagement with Haiti’s private sector.

In the area of Health and other Basic Services, U.S. government assistance improved health indicators through programs managed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and USAID. There have been significant gains in cholera prevention and control since the peak of the outbreak in 2011 – specifically in regards to improved disease surveillance; expanded laboratory capacity; and community-level water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions. The 2017 year-to-date figures represent a 66 percent decline in reported suspected cholera cases compared to 2016 and more than a 97 percent decline from 2011. The number of HIV-positive patients enrolled on anti-retroviral treatment grew from 4,294 in 2005 to 91,660 in 2017, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is provided to nearly 100 percent of pregnant women in care at a health facility – one of the highest rates in the world. With U.S. government support, Haiti successfully eliminated maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT) – a critical feat allowing the region of the Americas to be declared MNT-free. U.S. health assistance is focused on preventing, detecting, and responding to public health threats and building the Government of Haiti’s capacity to provide citizens with quality health care. Haiti’s Ministry of Health served as a pilot ministry by taking on increased responsibility for tracking expenditures. The ministry also implemented a results-based financing system that directs increased budgetary resources to high-performing health facilities.

In the area of governance and rule of law, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) and USAID are working to promote effective, transparent, and accountable administrative and law enforcement agencies. INL worked to bolster Haiti’s criminal justice system, fostering respect for human rights, improving counternarcotics efforts, and renovating corrections facilities. With U.S. assistance, the HNP added approximately 7,000 trained officers to its force since the devastating 2010 earthquake. The HNP now numbers approximately 15,500 officers, of which approximately 10 percent are women.

The U.S. government, through INL, helped alleviate prison overcrowding through construction of new prisons in Cabaret and Fort Liberté in 2016 and is nearing completion of a third prison in Petit Goave. However, the Haitian government will still need to contribute significant resources towards this effort to avoid further exacerbating overcrowding of prisons in Port-au-Prince. USAID provided software and training to targeted municipalities that increased tax collections and improved community planning and service delivery. Further details about engagement with civil society organizations are available in Attachments F and G, and a comprehensive list of programs and projects in Haiti can be found in Attachment B.

In a country more prone to natural disasters than almost any other, progress in long-term reconstruction and development has not been as great as Haiti or the United States had hoped. Still, there have been significant achievements in areas such as police professionalization, health indicators, and agricultural production. A description of the benchmarks and indicators linked with development objectives is provided in Attachment C.

While U.S. assistance providers made no major strategy adjustments in 2016, they continued to implement two key changes made in January 2015. First, in the area of shelter, assistance has evolved from building new housing to complementing private sector housing solutions. The new focus, which stretches funds to benefit more Haitians, is on improvements in access to housing financing and community development, including the maintenance and improvement of existing neighborhoods. Second, the objective of building a new port to support CIP changed, at the Government of Haiti’s request, to rehabilitating the existing port in Cap-Haitien. Both of these adjustments have lowered costs and enhanced project sustainability by promoting local solutions and Government of Haiti buy-in. These changes, as well as smaller strategy adjustments, are described in Attachment D.

Haiti made important advances in its reconstruction and development. The United States has a significant national interest in helping to build a prosperous, stable, and healthy future for a regional partner and neighbor so close to our shores, and has demonstrated a commitment to Haiti’s development over the long term. Additional information about the U.S. government’s engagement in Haiti is available in Attachments HKMN, and O.

Attachment A: Table of Contents

Attachment B: The Activities List responds to sections 5(b)(2) and 5(b)(3)(D) of the Assessing Progress in Haiti Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-162) (the Act). Section 5(b)(2) calls for “a breakdown of the work that United States Government agencies other than USAID and the Department of State are conducting in that recovery effort, and the cost of that assistance[.]” Section 5(b)(3)(D) calls for “the amounts committed, obligated, and expended on programs and activities to implement the Strategy, by sector and by implementing partner at the prime and subprime levels (in amounts of not less than $25,000)[.]” The information is provided in tabular form.

Attachment C: The Description of Indicators responds to section 5(b)(3)(C) of the Act. Section 5(b)(3)(C) of the Act calls for “a description of the quantitative and qualitative indicators used to evaluate the progress toward meeting the goals and objectives, benchmarks, and timeframes specified in the Strategy at the program level[.]” The information is provided in tabular form.

Attachment D: The Strategy Overview responds to sections 5(b)(1), 5(b)(3)(A) and 5(b)(3)(B) of the Act. Section 5(b)(1) calls for “a summary of the “Post-Earthquake USG Haiti Strategy: Toward Renewal and Economic Opportunity “, including any significant changes to the strategy over the reporting period and an explanation thereof[.]” Section 5(b)(3)(A) calls for “an assessment of progress, or lack thereof, over the reporting period toward meeting the goals and objectives, benchmarks, and timeframes specified in the Strategy[.]” Section 5(b)(3)(B) calls for “a description of any significant changes to the Strategy over the reporting period and an explanation thereof.” The information is provided in tabular form.

Attachment E: Responds to Sections 5(b)(3), 5(b)(3)(A), 5(b)(3)(B)(i), 5(b)(3)(B)(ii), 5(b)(3)(B)(iii), and 5(b)(3)(E) of the Act. Section 5(b)(3) calls for “an assessment of the progress of United States efforts to advance the objectives of the “Post Earthquake USG Haiti Strategy: Toward Renewal and Economic Opportunity”’ produced by the Department of State, compared to what remains to be achieved to meet specific goals[.]” Section 5(b)(3)(A) calls for “a description of any significant changes to the Strategy over the reporting period and an explanation thereof.” Section 5(b)(3)(B)(i) calls for “a description of progress toward designing and implementing a coordinated and sustainable housing reconstruction strategy that addresses land ownership, secure land tenure, water and sanitation, and the unique concerns of vulnerable populations such as women and children, as well as neighborhood and community revitalization, housing finance, and capacity building for the Government of Haiti to implement an effective housing policy.” Section 5(b)(3)(B)(ii) calls for “a description of United States Government efforts to construct and sustain the proposed port, as well as an assessment of the current projected timeline and cost for completion[.]” Section 5(b)(3)(B)(iii) calls for “a description of United States Government efforts to attract and leverage the investments of private sector partners to the CIP, including by addressing any policy implements[.]” Section 5(b)(3)(E) call for “a description of the risk mitigation measures put in place to limit the exposure of United States assistance provided under the Strategy to waste, fraud, and abuse[.]” The responses to these provisions of the Act are detailed in Attachment D.

Attachment F: Responds to section 5(b)(4) of the Act. Section 5(b)(4) calls for “a description of measures taken to strengthen, and United States Government efforts to improve, Haitian governmental and nongovernmental organizational capacity to undertake and sustain United States-supported recovery programs[.]”

Attachment G: Responds to section 5(b)(5) of the Act. Section 5(b)(5) calls for “as appropriate, a description of United States efforts to consult and engage with Government of Haiti ministries and local authorities on the establishment of goals and timeframes, and on the design and implementation of new programs under the Post-Earthquake USG Haiti Strategy: Toward Renewal and Economic Opportunity[.]”

Attachment H: Responds to section 5(b)(6) of the Act. Section 5(b)(6) calls for “a description of efforts by Haiti’s legislative and executive branches to consult and engage with Haitian civil society and grassroots organizations on the establishment of goals and timeframes, and on the design and implementation of new donor-financed programs, as well as efforts to coordinate with and engage the Haitian diaspora[.]”

Attachment I: Responds to section 5(b)(7) of the Act. Section 5(b)(7) calls for “consistent with the Government of Haiti’s ratification of the United Nations Convention Against Corruption, a description of efforts of the Governments of the United States and Haiti to strengthen Government of Haiti institutions established to address corruption, as well as related efforts to promote public accountability, meet public outreach and disclosure obligations, and support civil society participation in anti-corruption efforts[.]”

Attachment J: Responds to section 5(b)(8) of the Act. Section 5(b)(8) calls for “a description of efforts to leverage public-private partnerships and increase the involvement of the private sector in Haiti in recovery and development activities and coordinate programs with the private sector and other donors[.]”

Attachment K: Responds to section 5(b)(9) of the Act. Section 5(b)(9) calls for “a description of efforts to address the particular needs of vulnerable populations, including internally displaced persons, women, children, orphans, and persons with disabilities, in the design and implementation of new programs and infrastructure[.]”

Attachment L: Responds to section 5(b)(10) of the Act. Section 5(b)(10) calls for “a description of the impact that agriculture and infrastructure programs are having on the food security, livelihoods, and land tenure security of smallholder farmers, particularly women[.]”

Attachment M: Responds to section 5(b)(11) of the Act. Section 5(b)(11) calls for “a description of mechanisms for communicating the progress of recovery and development efforts to the people of Haiti, including a description of efforts to provide documentation, reporting and procurement information in Haitian Creole[.]”

Attachment N: Responds to section 5(b)(12) of the Act. Section 5(b)(12) calls for “a description of the steps the Government of Haiti is taking to strengthen its capacity to receive individuals who are removed, excluded, or deported from the United States[.]”

Attachment O: Responds to section 5(b)(13) of the Act. Section 5(b)(13) calls for “an assessment of actions necessary to be taken by the Government of Haiti to assist in fulfilling the objectives of the Strategy[.]”

Attachment B: Activities List

Attachment B: Activities List

Attachment C: Description of Indicators

Attachment C: Description Of Indicators [PDF Version]

Post Earthquake USG Haiti Strategy: Description of Indicators

Pillar

Agency /Office

Sector

Summary

Example Indicators

Indicator

Description

A

USAID

Infrastructure

Even before the earthquake, the Haitian economy was hamstrung by the deficiencies in its economic infrastructure. For many years, Haiti’s GDP grew slowly at best, in part because of recurrent problems in transporting goods and services and delivering electricity, water and fuel to households and businesses. The earthquake exacerbated this deficit, with physical damage to infrastructure alone estimated at $4.3 billion. In support of Haiti’s rebuilding, the USG will focus its efforts on infrastructure investments in the three priority development corridors of Port-au-Prince, Saint Marc and Cap Haitien.

Number of beneficiaries receiving improved infrastructure services due to USG assistance

This indicator reflects the number of people who benefit from improved infrastructure services due to USAID assistance. This means that people either use an infrastructure service (such as improved electricity or receive an infrastructure product (such as ICT or new or improved housing/shelter). USAID/Haiti programs contributing to this indicator include housing & settlements and energy.

A

USAID

Infrastructure

Haiti’s energy sector suffers from two main problems: broken electricity sector and charcoal dependency. USG strategy will focus on modernizing the electricity sector by enhancing its commercial viability, improving sector governance, strengthening institutional capacities, and attracting private sector participation. USG efforts will also focus on improving and expanding the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity. Regarding Haiti’s charcoal dependency, USG strategy will focus on switching large consumers of charcoal to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG).

Number of beneficiaries with improved energy services due to USG assistance

This is the number of people who benefit from improved energy services due to USAID assistance. Illustrative examples of improved energy service include a new electricity connection, improved cook stove, or access to gas, increased number of hours of electricity service, and reduced outages and voltage fluctuations.

B

USAID

Agriculture

Agriculture is central to the Haitian economy, generating nearly 25 percent of GDP and employing more than 60 percent of the population. Although agriculture did not suffer the effects of the earthquake as severely or directly as other sectors, it is under increasing pressure to serve as a near-term engine for economic recovery and employment opportunities. The importance of jumpstarting agricultural productivity immediately has been echoed strongly by the GOH and throughout the donor community. Without a quick infusion of resources into Haiti’s agricultural sector and associated infrastructure, the economic development of the country risks bypassing the majority of Haitians who make their livelihoods in agriculture. At the same time, Haiti’s prosperity rests on building growing and diversified industries. In particular, an inclusive economy and a strong middle class, requires a more conducive environment for micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs).

Value of exports of targeted agricultural commodities as a result of USG assistance

This indicator will measure the value of regional and non-regional exports in USD attributable to USG assistance. Exports should be counted against the baseline of existing export levels from the previous year (existing exports before USG intervention for the first year, or additional exports for subsequent years). Exports can include those within and outside of neighboring regions, so as to avoid loss of counter-seasonal exports, which often leave the proximate region. The commodities to be counted are those that are targeted in the work plans and/or contracts of the implementing partners. It collects all trade within and outside of a region, but ONLY that which is USG-attributable.

Number of additional hectares under improved technologies or management practices as a result of USG assistance

This indicator measures the area (in hectares) of land or water (for fisheries) first brought under new technology during the current reporting year. Any technology that was first adopted in a previous reporting year should be marked as “Continuing”. Technologies to be counted here are agriculture-related technologies and innovations including those that address climate change adaptation and mitigation (e.g. carbon sequestration, clean energy, and energy efficiency as related to agriculture).

Number of rural households benefiting directly from USG interventions

Beneficiaries include the households of people who receive the goods and services of an implementing partner or participate in training, in which “training” is defined as individuals to whom knowledge or skills have been imparted through interactions that are intentional, structured, and purposed for imparting knowledge or skills.

B

USAID

Environment

Number of hectares on hillside protected as a result of USG interventions

Hectares on hillsides include all sloped land that is above the productive plains up to the drainage divide. Number of hectares protected covers the surface area on hillsides of targeted corridors stabilized from: 1) mechanical (check dams, dry walls, gully plugs, etc..) and biological (bamboo, vetiver, elephant grass, filter trips, etc..) soil conservation structures; 2) reforestation activities; 3) sustainable agriculture practices such as agroforestry, contour farming, terracing, permaculture etc.…

B

USAID

Market Strengthening

Value of new private sector investments in the agricultural sector and food chain leveraged by Feed the Future (FtF)

Investment is defined as any use of resources intended to increase future production output or income, to improve the sustainable use of agriculture-related natural resources (soil, water, etc.), to improve water or land management, etc. The food chain includes both upstream and downstream investments. Upstream investments include any type of agricultural capital used in the agricultural production process such as animals for traction, storage bins, and machinery. Downstream investments could include capital investments in equipment, etc. to do post-harvest transformation/processing of agricultural products as well as the transport of agricultural products to markets. Private sector includes any privately-led agricultural activity whether it is managed by an individual/household or a formal company. A CBO or NGO may be included if they engage in for-profit agricultural activity. Leveraged by FtF implementation indicates that the new investment was directly or indirectly encouraged or facilitated by activities funded by the FtF initiative. Investments reported should not include funds received by the investor from USG as part of any grant or other award. New investment means investment made during the reporting year.

B

USAID

Economic Security

% increase in new private sector investment in targeted value chain

Investment is defined as any use of resources intended to increase future production output or income. Increases in this indicator indicate that operators within value chains are willing to make investments to improve productivity and sales, suggesting that the value chain is growing to absorb new volumes.

% increase in sales (USD value) in targeted value chain

Indicator measures the progress in sales among the micro, small, and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs) in the target value chains in the context of improving overall sector competitiveness and market expansion.

# of MSMEs receiving business development services from USG assisted sources.

This indicator measures directly access to business development services, which contributes to expanding markets and trade.

C

USAID

Health

Unemployment, inadequate protection from exploitation and abuse, sickness, lack of adequate nutrition, and limited education often pose roadblocks to young Haitians and prevent them from reaching their full potential and becoming more active and productive members of society. Additionally, lack of access to basic preventive health services leads to more costly health and societal outcomes down the road when, for instance, a person contracts HIV and has to be kept on antiretroviral therapy for the rest of his life or a mother dies in childbirth, leaving orphaned children to be cared for. To assist the GOH in addressing certain of these roadblocks and improving the health of its population, the USG health strategy will address a wide range of health care needs in Haiti, with a particular focus on health system strengthening in USG development corridors The USG will also provide smaller scale assistance for other critical basic services, including education and child protection. This assistance will reinforce the work of major education donors, continue ongoing USG-funded public system strengthening programs, enhance education services in USG development corridors, and facilitate private offers of assistance to build schools, assist vulnerable children, and provide other basic services for children.

Percent of people of reproductive age using a modern family planning method in USAID geographic target areas

Numerator: Number of women aged 15-49 (married or in a sexual union) who are currently using a modern contraceptive method during the reporting period. Modern methods include pills, condoms, IUD, injectables, implants, and voluntary surgical contraception (VSC). Denominator: Total number of women aged 15-49 in project catchment areas

Percent of births attended by a skilled doctor, nurse or midwife

Numerator: Births in a given year attended by a skilled birth attendant (SBA) such as a doctor, nurse or midwife (a doctor, midwife or nurse is a person who, having been regularly admitted to a professional educational program, is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice); Denominator: Total number of women aged 15-49 in project catchment areas

Education

Number of learners receiving reading interventions at the primary level

This indicator is designed to measure the number of primary-level students and learners exposed to interventions designed to improve reading skills at the primary level. Interventions may include a wide range of activities and approaches, including: remedial instruction, tracking and teaching students by ability groups, providing
increased time on task, and other interventions. A reading intervention may include a component of pedagogy, materials, teacher coaching, mentoring or training, and improved accountability or reporting, perhaps to parent or community groups.
Students and learners in both the formal and non-formal education systems should be counted here.

Number of teachers/educators/teaching assistants who successfully completed in-service training or received intensive coaching or mentoring with USG support

Number of teachers/educators/teaching assistants who have successfully completed an in-service training program to teach or assist in schools or equivalent non-school based settings, with USG support (e.g. scholarships or a training program funded in whole or in part by USG). Successful completion requires that trainees meet the completion requirements of the structured training program as defined by the program offered. To be counted here, training must be at least two consecutive class days or more in duration, or 16 contact hours or more scheduled intermittently. People trained as teaching assistants or coaches should be counted here. People trained under Fulbright or in sectors other than education who will be/are teaching in the formal or non-formal systems should be counted here.

C

CDC/USAID

Health

HIV Clinical Services

Estimated number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) currently enrolled on ART

Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) for PLHIV has increased from 4,294 in 2005 to 91,660 in 2017.

Estimated percent of HIV-positive pregnant women receiving ART to prevent transmission of the virus to their babies

The percent of HIV-positive pregnant women receiving ART to prevent transmission of the virus to their babies has risen from 40% in 2010 to 100%* in 2017 *the numerator captures women who test positive for HIV during an ANC visit and women who test positive for HIV during delivery; the denominator only includes pregnant women who test positive during an ANC visit — hence, the numerator can be larger than the denominator.

C

CDC

Health

Cholera

Number of new cholera cases between January 1, 2017 – November 2017

Cholera incidence is down 96% in 2017 (12,800 suspected cases) from 2011 (352,033 suspected cases)

Case fatality rate from cholera

Facility case fatality rate under 1% in 2017

D

USAID

Justice and Governance

Underlying every economic and social development success story is a responsive, just, and effective state capable of ensuring the legal rights and personal safety of its people and investors. The earthquake severely degraded the institutional capacity of a government that was just getting on its feet after years of instability. Haiti will only achieve long-term stability and economic growth through inclusive, transparent and accountable governance, credible political processes, and national and local governance institutions that deliver basic services, including security and the rule of law. Moving beyond a perpetual state of fragility requires a responsive and capable national and local government. The GOH must be committed to political, economic and institutional reforms that address security and social inclusion. In turn, donors need to sustain their commitment to helping set the foundation for effective democratic governance.

Percent of households stating that government’s ability to meet citizen needs has improved

Needs of the household members to be satisfied by the GOH are related to the protection of human rights, delivering security, organizing disaster preparedness campaign, and efforts made to reform the judicial sector and to realize fair and free elections among the most critical. The question does not have a time mark, but households’ heads are asked to confirm or reject the assertion that generally the GOH is making progress meeting the citizen’s needs.

Percent of households stating that corruption among public officials is common or very common

Corruption is the illegal use of entrusted resources for personal benefits. This practice can be pinpointed by household members who perceive it in the discomfort of not normally benefiting from government services while resources were intended to be used for that purpose.

Percent of households that believe projects carried out by the municipality benefit people like themselves and their family

Information gathered under this indicator allows respondents answer to a yes-or-no question concerning the different services, programs, or projects made available for them and their family by the local government of their municipality.

Percent of citizens who, after they were victimized, reported the crime to judicial authorities

Information gathered under this indicator allows the respondents who were victims of crime to answer to a yes-or-no question whether or not they have reported their case to the competent judicial authorities.

D

Treasury OTA

Governance

OTA is assisting Haiti in carrying out its public financial management reform agenda to generate more of its own revenues, strengthen budget formulation and execution, and foster the conditions for sustainable economic growth.

Capital Budgeting: Within the Directorate of Public Investment, adoption of standardized procedures, more informative and transparent budget documents, and systems to monitor investment projects

Strengthened budgeting processes result in the implementation of projects that achieve maximum social and economic benefits and strongly align with development priorities.

Treasury operations: Accomplish key building blocks toward establishment of Treasury Single Account (TSA) such as establishing procedures to open/close accounts under the control of the Treasury, reducing number of bank accounts, and establishing cash management reporting.

A unified structure of government banking operations improves cash management and control while minimizing the cost of government borrowing and the opportunity cost of idle cash resources. Establishing the TSA concept will improve the quality and timeliness of fiscal information as well as provide a foundation for improved transparency of government financial operations.

Debt Management: Establishment of a Debt Directorate with developed and documented structure, procedures, staffing, and debt management strategy

Building institutional and staff capacity on debt management will improve the Ministry’s ability to manage its cash and debt issuance needs.

Revenue Administration: increase in collections of audit assessments in the Large Taxpayers Office (LTO) and implementation of audit Quality Review standards and procedures in LTO

Strengthening the capacity of the Large Taxpayer Office will help Haiti to achieve more efficient, responsible collection of revenues.

D

US Coast Guard and DoD (SOUTHCOM)

Maritime Security (Haitian Coast Guard)

The unstable and fragile political regimes of Haiti compound the problems of managing its maritime domains. Maritime criminal and illegal operations are confined not only to the coasts of Haiti, but also to the island states in Caribbean. The inability of Haiti to combat the threats regularly posed by drug and human smugglers has resulted in the constant US Coast Guard presence in the Haitian waters. The US Dept. of Defense (SOUTHCOM) and the US Coast Guard have been working with the Haitian Coast Guard to strengthen and secure its maritime borders and combat maritime criminal and illegal operations.

Number of Haitian Coast Guard officers trained

The USG (SOUTHCOM) provided a wide array of training for Haitian Coast Guard officers. Mostly, these trainings are geared toward learning English and technical training such as diesel engine maintenance, electronic equipment, and boat driving.

Number of counter-narcotic or Haitian migrant repatriation operations

Haitian Coast Guard executes counter-narcotic operations and migrant repatriation operations with the US DEA and US Coast Guard.

Number of other national missions completed

Haitian Coast Guard executes other national missions such as enforcing safety and security zone for critical infrastructure, transportation of VIPs and distinguished visitors, and regular patrol of the port.

Communication coverage (Radio communication)

Haitian Coast Guard recently completed the installation of HF radios. It allows the Haitian Coast Guard to communicate with all assets in Haitian waters including the US Coast Guard assets.

D

US Coast Guard and DoD (SOUTHCOM)

Disaster Preparedness and Response (Haitian Directorate of Civil Protections)

After the devastating earthquake in 2010, the US Dept. of Defense (SOUTHCOM) spent $45 million (USD) on various humanitarian assistances projects including Emergency Operations Centers (EOC) to manage with natural disasters. In combination with specialized training by the Louisiana State National Guard, the GoH has built the capacity to deal with a small to medium scale disaster.

Number of Directorate of Civil Protection (DCP) officials trained

The USG (SOUTHCOM/LANG) provided a wide array of training for Directorate of Civil Protection (DCP) officials. Mostly, these training are geared toward how to run an emergency operation center and FEMA’s National Incident Management System.

Development of Haiti National Disaster Response Plan

Based on support from the USG (SOUTHCOM/LANG), the DCP developed the National Disaster Response Plan.

D

INL

Strengthen judicial independence and operational capacity of the courts

The Superior Council of the Judiciary (CSPJ), launched in July 2012 by President Martelly to oversee the performance of the judiciary, represents a major step toward judicial independence. INL’s support in the post-earthquake period concentrated on the CSPJ’s Judicial Inspection Unit, which will provide oversight and monitoring over Haiti’s clerks and judges; USAID has provided technical assistance and equipment to the CSPJ. Political infighting within the nascent CSPJ and reluctance by the Justice Ministry to fully relinquish control over appointment and removal of judges have prevented the council from becoming fully functional. Ultimately, an independent CSPJ will encourage accountability and effectiveness of Haiti’s judges, and elevate the judiciary to a branch of government coequal with the executive and the legislative, and help reform an institution plagued by inefficiency, corruption, and dysfunction. INL awarded a contract in September 2014 to complete the construction of a partially-existing security wall around the Magistrate’s school, Haiti’s training facility for judges.

Number of court inspectors, deans and clerks trained

INL grant to the American Bar Association worked with the Judicial Inspection Unit (JIU) of the Superior Council of the Judiciary (CSPJ). Specific training through the life of the grant targeted JIU processes and methodology. The period of performance for the JIU ended on 3/31/17 and included support for the development of a strategic plan, procedures and methodologies for inspection, assistance in enforcing judicial fee scale, and establishing a pilot office. Seven experienced judges were appointed JIU inspectors in spring 2015. In summer 2015, the first JIU inspection of a first instance court took place in Hinche.

Infrastructure constructed

INL did not support justice sector infrastructure improvements in FY2017.

D

INL

Enhance the efficiency of the criminal justice system

Through training and engagement with Haitian officials, INL has encouraged expeditious review of the criminal and criminal procedure code drafts, currently under presidential committee review. In the absence of Parliamentary-approved revised criminal codes, INL contributed to criminal justice system efficiency by training justice sector officials since the earthquake on proper investigative techniques, reporting, case preparation, and evidence collection.

Number of justice sector actors trained

INL has trained approximately 3,470 justice sector officers and the grantee’s work and training ended on March 31, 2017.

D

INL

Renovate the Corrections Sector

INL’s construction of prisons will continue through the end of CY 2017, adding a capacity of 800 beds. This construction will contribute to alleviating prison overcrowding, but is not sufficient to addressing the systemic problems in the justice sector that lead to it. INL funds one subject matter expert advisors with the head of the DAP.

Infrastructure constructed

Fort Liberte Prison – Completed Aug 2016
Cabaret Prison – Completed Sept 2016
Hinche Prison – Completed March 2017
Petit Goave Prison – Est. Completion Dec 2017

Number of corrections officers trained

Through a cooperative agreement, the MDPSCS trained a total of 105 DAP officers.

DAP Standard Operating Procedures adopted

INL worked with MINUSTAH, the Donor Core Group, and the Minister of Justice to identify gaps in DAP Standard Operating Procedures and drafted new ones. INL’s contracted subject matter experts embedded in the DAP, as well as an overall HNP capacity building contract contributed to this effort.

D

INL

Develop a sustainable HNP

INL supports the recruitment and screening of applicants and provides food supplements, uniforms, and hygiene supplies to cadets at the HNP School. The biggest challenge to HNP development is an insufficient budget, which primarily supports salary costs, and difficulty obtaining timely disbursements. An important goal of INL’s capacity building projects is to help the HNP develop its capacity to plan and execute its budget. See also below.

The number of new HNP cadets that graduate from the School per year

Promotion 22 (May 2011) graduated 877 cadets. Promotion 23 (December 2012) graduated 239 cadets. Promotions 24 and 25 were the first classes of more than 1,000 cadets. with 1,058 from Promotion 24 (December 2013), and 1,118 from Promotion 25 (January 2015). For Promotion 26, the HNP screened more than 7,000 recruits who passed the written exam and 1,474 cadets (185 women) graduated (May 2016). Promotion 27 graduated 946 cadets (80 females). Promotion 28 includes 1047 cadets and the expected gradation is December 2017. The number INL supported graduates since the 2010 earthquake is 5,713 (556 females).

HNP Standard Operating Procedures developed

Working with MINUSTAH and INL-funded subject matter experts, the HNP stood up a Strategic Planning Unit (SPU) in 2014. This unit drafted the follow-on 2017-21 five-year plan for the force, providing budget, human resources, and administrative guidance to the HNP.

D

INL

Develop a sustainable HNP

INL completed an additional $1.5 million in construction and refurbishment of critical infrastructure at the HNP School to help the institute support large promotions, consistent with the Haitian Government’s 2017-2021 Police Development Plan. INL completed the construction of seven police stations since the earthquake. INL’s technical assistance to the HNP includes: the provision of up to five UNPOL police advisors and one UNPOL corrections advisors and embedded mentors for key HNP leaders and offices to improve administrative, logistics, and management functions; and embedded advisors from the New York Police Department who have introduced and implemented a community policing program within the HNP. See also above.

Vehicles/buildings maintained

HNP capacity building work for fleet and equipment management continues, including three embedded subject-matter experts with the HNP central garage, and increasingly focused on expanding fleet service outside the capital. Budget constraints and the challenges of procuring appropriate parts for repair and maintenance continue.

Infrastructure constructed

HNP School Classrooms, Pavillion & Auditorium 2013 Le Clerc Commissariat – December 2013
National Palace Barracks – July 2014
HNP Pavillion La Pointe Commissariat – February 2014.
Caracol Commissariat –February 2015.
Police Academy Wall – February 2014.
Martissant Commissariat – February 2015.
Vive Michel Commissariat –February 2015.
St Marc Commissariat – March 2015.
HNP School Classroom – 2015.
PAP & CAP HNP/BLTS K9 Facilities – May 2015.
HNP School Latrines – August 2015.
HNP School Kitchen – February 2016.
HNP Special Planning Unit – March 2016.
HNP/BLTS Modular Units – March 2017.
Terrier Rouge Commissariat – July 2017.

Number of UNPOL advisors provided with targeted skills

INL has deployed UNPOLs continuously since the earthquake. The current U.S. contingent of UNPOLs is authorized 29 Police Advisors and five Corrections Advisors. The contingent will shrink to five Police Advisors and one Corrections Advisors as of October 1, 2017.

Crime reporting by UNODC and HNP and periodic reporting by the UN Mission

INL utilizes crime reporting by UNODC and the HNP and periodic analysis by MINUSTAH through the UN Secretary General’s reporting to track notional trends in crime and HNP performance. From this limited pool of information, it appears the overall crime rate dropped for a period in 2014, particularly in kidnappings, but rose again across violent crimes in 2015. MINUSTAH reported in 2015 and 2016 continued improvement in the HNP’s ability to control demonstrations and address gang activity, with no significant increases in levels of violence or insecurity in geographic departments from which the UN military component withdrew.

D

INL (with implementer DEA for some initiatives)

Assist the HNP to develop an effective counternarcotics strategy

The HNP’s counternarcotics unit (BLTS) has become one of the force’s most effective actors since the earthquake. INL has provided training, vehicles, and equipment to the BLTS. INL procured the dogs for the BLTS K-9 unit and funded the construction of kennel facilities. INL and inter-agency party DEA provide follow-on training and in-country operational support. INL, through partnership with the Miami-Dade Police Department, trained 75 BLTS officers in a variety of advanced police skills. INL is continuing to support the deployment of BLTS throughout the country by installing INL-procured modular units at the primary ports of entry and key checkpoints.

Number of HNP counternarcotics unit (BLTS) outposts operational

INL installed modular infrastructure for the HNP counternarcotics unit at the Port-au-Prince and Cap Haitien airports, Les Cayes CG base. Malpasse and Ouanaminthe border with the Dominican Republic, expanding the BLTS unit’s coverage across the country.

Number of canines provided

The K-9 Unit work continued with 19 dogs with drug, explosive, and currency detection capabilities.

Use of K-9 team in operations

The BLTS uses the K-9 unit daily at Port-au-Prince and Cap Haitien airports to screen arrivals, and routinely in boat and house searches conducted by the BLTS.

Number of BLTS Officers

The number of BLTS officers grew from approximately 40 to 229 officers. Fifty nine new agents were recently transferred and are in counter narcotics training.

D

INL (with implementer Treasury for UCREF initiative)

Enhance transparency in GOH institutions

INL’s embedded mentor in the Office of the Inspector General, working with MINUSTAH (also collocated in the office) assisted the Office of the Inspector General to make progress in combating corruption and police abuse. The Inspector General’s office meets frequently with various human rights groups in Haiti and leads bi-weekly press conferences to inform the public of the role of the IG office, resulting in increased visibility and transparency. Working with the government of Haiti, INL and Treasury worked to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the financial intelligence unit (UCREF) to operate in compliance with international anti-money laundering standards, institutionalize a financial crimes task force, develop the central bank, and establish controls to protect the financial sector.

Number of programs implemented to address police corruption and abuse

INL continues to provide an embedded mentor to the Office of the Inspector General (IG). The IG office continued outreach to the public in 2016 through press conferences, and continued investigations and vetting of police officers. The total number of police removed from the payroll by the IG’s office in 2014-2016 now tops 801, for issues ranging from abandonment of post to criminal activity.

Amount of Equipment and Training provided to Financial Intelligence Unit (UCREF)

INL provided hardware, anti-money laundering software, and constructed a secure server room for Haiti’s financial intelligence unit. INL is in the process of soliciting and installing new anti-money laundering software from UNODC.

A – Infrastructure and Energy
B – Food and Economic Security
C – Health and Other Basic Services
D – Governance and Rule of Law

Attachment D: Strategy Overview

Attachment D: Strategy Overview [PDF Version]

USG Haiti Strategic Overview by Component

Strategy Component Strategy Objective Revised 5-year Goal
(as of November 2012 unless otherwise indicated)
Status of 5-year Goal
(as of September 30, 2017)
Status
(as of September 30, 2017)
PILLAR A: Infrastructure and Energy
Priority 1: Housing
Support the upgrading of up to five Port-au-Prince neighborhoods, including resources to accelerate rubble removal using heavy equipment Remove rubble Remove 2.5M cubic meters of rubble. Support for rubble removal is complete with no further activity in this area. Support for rubble removal is complete with no further activity in this area.
Shelter solutions for IDPs Provide shelter solutions
to more than 300,000 people.
The U.S. government (USG) exceeded the goal for this area. USG support for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) solutions is complete, and original goals have been exceeded.
Upgrade neighborhoods
in Port-au-Prince
Repair/reconstruct 5,040 homes through U.S. government contribution to HRF/WB neighborhood upgrading project. The USG contribution to HRF/WB neighborhood upgrading project achieved the following:

a. 877 houses built/rebuilt
b. 1,134 houses repaired
c. 15,582 households returned to their neighborhoods upon completion of housing repair and reconstruction works and support to return to safe rental units.
d. 75,035 households benefit from community-wide upgrading

The Haiti Reconstruction Fund/World Bank (HRF/WB) Neighborhood Upgrading project has concluded with 97% of resources expended.
Undertake integrated investments to facilitate the establishment of up to three new communities that offer housing, jobs, and sustainable economic opportunities New housing settlements Update: September 2014
* Capacity building with community-based organizations to strengthen community management of new settlements.
* As a result of GOH-requested design changes, increases in the cost of construction materials, and delays in obtaining clear land title, the cost for the new settlements increased significantly contributing to reduced goals. The number of houses directly constructed by USAID reached 906 and is now complete. The number of houses to be constructed in partnership with other donors is 574 at Terrier Rouge, Ouanaminthe and DLA 3.
The USAID/Haiti Mission, in partnership with other donors, built 1,332 new permanent homes in Haiti. (NOTE: This does not include housing work done under the USG Contribution to the HRF/WB, which is recorded under a different Strategy Component.)

a. Village La Difference (Caracol): 750 homes
b. Haute Damier (Cabaret/DLA 1.5): 156 homes
c. Terrier Rouge (with Inter-American Development Bank): 242 homes
d. Ouanaminthe (with Inter-American Development Bank): 184 homes

USAID/Haiti’s work to establish new communities concluded in 2017 with the exception of sewer system upgrades at Village La Difference (Caracol).
Provide capacity building and policy reform to the GOH Provide technical assistance in urban planning, management, construction, and housing administration. * Technical assistance to build capacity of the GOH and improve management of housing sector. The USG worked closely with the GOH’s housing agencies,Unité de Construction de Logements et de Bâtiments Publics (UCLBP) &
Entreprise Publique de Promotion de Logements Sociaux (EPPLS) to improve their capacity to manage public services in newly settled communities. USAID invested in the provision of integrated services (water, sanitation, livelihoods, education, and community relations) to improve the quality of life in USAID-financed new settlements.
USAID invested in land administration and management programs aiming at increasing outreach and awareness of manuals on how to buy and sell property in Haiti and on securing land rights in Haiti through training sessions and workshops. More than 900 people (of which 600 were women) from key stakeholders of the Haitian housing sector were trained on how to buy and sell property while 836 people participated in outreach events where the issue of land and rights was raised.
USAID will conclude most housing and community-focused capacity building programs in 2017, but plans are under consideration to continue providing policy assistance and enabling environment work for housing finance, mortgage markets, and land titling.
Provide policy assistance in land tenure and titling, the creation of an enabling environment for housing finance and mortgage markets, and regulation and supervision of building codes.
Increase access to housing finance Support the expansion of the housing sector through new mechanisms, exploring the use of the following:
* Home improvement loans;
* Construction finance;
* Mortgage lending;
* Subsidies/vouchers.
Generate $20M in available housing finance through OPIC’s housing finance facility and $15M in available housing finance through new DCAs over 10 years (end of strategy, plus six years). Besides the OPIC mortgage facility and the DCA guarantee for housing, the Home Ownership and Mortgage Expansion (HOME) program, which began in 2015 to foster access to affordable housing through housing finance to low to mid-income households, is reporting an increase in the disbursement of loans by financial institutions partners. *The HOME project has partnered with six local financial institutions including banks and microcredit institutions (SOCOLAVIM, SOGESOL, KOTELAM, SOGEBEL, Capital Bank and CFP) and four local housing developers (TECINA, CHABUMA, GBCI and MC Stephenson) in order to link the supply side (housing projects) to the demand side (housing finance products) of the market. During FY 2017, the HOME project has partnered with additional local financial institutions, banks and credit unions, and affordable housing developers to create the market for affordable housing. To date, U.S. government financial institution partners have disbursed 610 loans mobilizing $4.1M in loans to support affordable housing. The partner developers have invested $1.7M in preparation of new housing sites.
Priority 2: Ports
Assist the GOH in leveraging Haiti’s proximity to the US market by increasing the efficiency of Haiti’s port sector and improving regulatory oversight Support the GOH in the development of a long-term ports sector strategy that addresses the need for a modern container port and increases sector efficiency and regulatory oversight. Update: September 2014

1. Contribute to upgrades to the port in Cap Haitien; after further due diligence, the GOH and USAID agreed that the optimal approach would be to invest in a major upgrading of the Cap Haitien Port (CHP) to meet the projected port services needs for the next 10-15 years.

2. Provide technical assistance to the Ministry of Finance and Economy, the Council for the Modernization of Public Enterprises, and the National Ports Authority to improve customs regulations and services to reduce port charges to regional levels and increase sector efficiency.

USAID and the Government of Haiti have agreed on a master plan for the reconstruction of the Cap Haitien Port. The Ministry of Finance has agreed to a competitive process to select a private operator, while USAID will fund the reconstruction. For the procurement that will lead to the Design-Build Construction Contract for the major construction works, USAID completed the pre-qualification process and is evaluating final construction proposals.

A vessel tracking system and portable reefer power supplies were delivered to the Cap-Haitien Port through the agreement with the United Nation’s Office of Project Services (UNOPS) for landside improvements. Initial engineering assessments for the landside works were completed and design is underway.

Through a technical assistance contract, USAID continues to provide support to the National Port Authority to improve its regulatory, administrative, and operational capacity at the CHP; and to provide technical support to the Customs Administration to streamline customs services at the CHP.

The GOH agreed to reduce government collected port tariffs by 50%, from $310/TEU (twenty-foot equivalent unit) to $155/TEU. GOH collected port tariffs are a primary impediment to price competitiveness with the Dominican Republic and other regional ports.

The GOH continues its procurement process to select a firm to operate and maintain the Cap Haitien port for a 25-year period. The three preselected firms are preparing their bids. Award of an agreement is planned for late 2017.

Invest in the design and development of a major international container port in the Northern Corridor in partnership with other bilateral and multilateral partners and the private sector
Develop an integrated investment package in coordination with the GOH and other partners to spur the development of an economic growth pole anchored by the port development
Priority 3: Energy
Electricity Provision
Modernize the electricity sector by enhancing its commercial viability, improving sector governance, strengthening institutional capacity, and attracting the participation of the private sector Legal and regulatory reform * Reduce % of technical losses by EDH from 20% (pre-USG intervention) to 10%;

* Increase EDH cash recovery index from 22% (pre-USG intervention) to 58% by September 2015.

The activity was not extended or renewed and originally-planned follow-on work was not undertaken due to lack of political will. The cash recovery index of 31.7% achieved under USAID’s work subsequently dropped to under 24%. The drop reflects a lack of political will on the part of EDH to continue the reform efforts. As a result, USAID decided not to continue this program beyond 2014.
Increase revenue collection by the GOH electricity provider (EDH)
Reduce commercial and technical losses
Improve and expand the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity through rehabilitation and new construction to reduce cost, increase access, and improve reliability, using micro-grids and renewable energy when feasible. Expand generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity * Expand power generation due to USG-supported power sources as follows:
* 34MW in Cap Haitien corridor
* 2MW solar in Cap Haitien corridor
* 5MW renewable in the 3 development corridors* 85K households, businesses, and industries with legal access to electricity service from USG programs.
The Caracol 10MW plant has been operational since June 2012. Energy sales to clients operating outside of the Caracol Industrial Park has grown substantially. The plant is providing 24/7 reliable electricity to the tenants in the industrial park as well as over 8,000 residences, small businesses and government institutions outside of the park.

The earlier goal to expand generation was based on projected growth in electricity consumption by the tenants in the Caracol Industrial Park. Actual consumption has been much lower than anticipated and future generation expansion will be the responsibility of the independent operator. The earlier goal to reach 85,000 customers refers to USAID-funded rehabilitation of five sub-stations in Port-au-Prince. USAID completed its work, but the GOH did not proceed with expanding the customer base, instead they focused on providing more reliable electricity to existing customers.

USAID owns and operates a 10 megawatt power plant at the Caracol Industrial Park (CIP). The power plant supplies reliable electricity 24 hours per day 7 days per week to all its customers.

The power plant supplies electricity for manufacturing operations inside the Caracol Industrial Park and electrifies communities in the surrounding areas that were not serviced by the Haitian government utility. The power plant supports almost 12,900 jobs (as of Q3 FY2017) within the Industrial Park, and has enabled many new small businesses to emerge in the targeted communes. USAID plans to connect 4 new buildings within the CIP in 2017, including a new company planning to move to Haiti and create thousands more jobs in the park. The power plant services over 10,000 individually metered households, businesses, and organizations in five communes in northern Haiti: Caracol, Limonade, Terrier Rouge, Trou du Nord, and St. Suzanne (this includes clients in CIP and EKAM village in Caracol). More than 3,000 new customers are planned to be added in these zones before March 2018.

USAID and the Government of Haiti agreed to a revised schedule of electricity charges for all customers that reflect the cost of service for the electricity. The new electricity rates were initiated from January 2017 and will gradually be increased over the next two years until they reach full cost recovery levels. USAID and the Ministry of Finance have agreed that privatizing the power plant and distribution network is the best way to ensure sustainability. USAID and the Ministry of Finance’s mutual objective is to privatize the entire utility by spring 2018.

Priority 4: Alternative Cooking Technology
Design a comprehensive transition program that encourages households, food vendors, and energy-intensive businesses to reduce their consumption of charcoal by using cleaner and more efficient cooking technologies such as improved biomass cookstoves and/or by switching to alternative fuels such as Liquefied Petroleum Gas. Generate incentives and awareness among
consumers of alternative cooking technologies and fuels.
43,500 households and businesses using improved cooking technologies This activity was completed in 2015, with results that exceeded the goal. At the conclusion of this activity in 2014, 117,805 households/schools/businesses converted to LPG and improved cook stoves, reducing charcoal consumption of 120,458 metric tons (MT), CO2 emissions by 823,930 MT, and resulting in a cumulative savings of over $16.0M as a result of reduced use of charcoal.
Offer financing and technical assistance to
entrepreneurs to develop supply chains of cleaner fuels and cooking technologies.
Move consumers from the existing firewood and charcoal supply chains to the new supply chains.
PILLAR B: Food and Economic Security
Priority 1: Food Security – Agriculture and Nutrition
Ensure agriculture sector growth within targeted corridors * Within selected watersheds, target two to three value chains for domestic staples based on revenue-generating potential.

* Support export value chains in cacao and mango.

* Transform supported value chains by rehabilitating rural roads, boosting productivity, reducing post-harvest losses, creating enabling policies, improving local governance, and supporting commerce.
Improve agricultural productivity in the USG development corridors as measured by an increased yield (kg/ha) for focus crops (corn, beans, rice, bananas, mangos and cacao) from the 2010 baseline In addition to FTF-North (AVANSE), USAID supports two additional agricultural projects: Chanje Lavi Plantè (CLP) and Appui à la Recherche et au Development Agricole (AREA). While AVANSE and CLP focus on productivity, watershed protection and market strengthening, AREA’s main objective is to build domestic capacity to conduct research and make available new technologies that will increase farmers’ incomes.

Recent hurricanes and flooding have negatively affected crops for local consumption, but at least one export crop (cacao) saw an increase in production and revenue.
Over the past 12 months, Haiti has gone through hurricanes and flooding which have negatively affected indicators for focus crops for local consumption (rice, maize, plantain, beans). However, export crops (mango and cacao) saw an increase in production and revenue. Out of 2,265 tons of cacao exported out of the north of Haiti, the AVANSE project contributed 1,359 tons or 60% for a total of $4.2M in 2016. Chanje Lavi Plantè contributed to $ 1.5M of mango export. The water diversion system, built by WINNER in the Rivière Grise, protected all 10,000 hectares of agricultural field in the area as well as the crops, irrigation canals and houses, while major damage was registered outside of the protected area. Chanje Lavi Plante also focused on irrigation canal cleaning and establishment of demonstration plots to test improved seeds. In the St. Marc corridor, 30,000 meters of canal were cleaned, allowing an additional 5,000 hectares to be irrigated. As of June 2017, 21,800 hectares of land have been under improved irrigation and drainage service as a result of CLP. In the Port au Prince corridor one of the hybrid corn seeds tested had a yield 7.95 metric tons/ha in the trial plots (where average yield for non-intervention sites was 0.8 metric tons/ha), and was selected along with another high performing hybrid corn seed for a full corn campaign in March/April 2017.
Increase the number of households which have doubled farm income over the 2010 base year due to USG assistance to over 100,000 households by June 2015. Gross margin for base year 2010 as measured by gross margin per hectare: corn $127; beans $190; rice $350; plantains $1,337. The strategy was extended to 2018. Under our Feed the Future (FTF) projects, USAID investments in agriculture have benefited more than 84,000 rural households of which 78,000 reported significant increases in income. In 2017, FTF-North (AVANSE) and FTF-West (Chanje Lavi Plante) results indicate that more than 4,400 farmers in the North and 2,756 farmers in the West received productivity training and technical assistance which should increase their agricultural income. Income increases will be assessed based on qualitative and quantitative analysis of several proxy measures at the midterm and/or end of each program.
Strengthen agricultural markets in USG development corridors as measured by:

* The value in incremental sales for farmers of focus crops (corn, bean, rice, bananas), with a June 2015 goal of $26M in additional sales;

* The value of new private sector investments in the agricultural sector food chain leveraged by Feed the Future, with a June 2015 goal of $5M;

* The value of international exports of mangoes in target corridors from US-supported households, with a June 2015 goal of $4.6M.

Recent hurricanes and flooding have negatively affected crops for local consumption, but some export crops nevertheless saw an increase in production and revenue. * Under FTF-North (AVANSE) FY2016 direct sales of 119,577 lbs of cacao by 675 farmers involved in a marketing agreement with the top Haitian cacao exporter yielded $105,000 (HTG 6,475,792) in sales for these farmers. Rice sales by FTF-North farmers comprised $2.2M and exceeded targets by 37%. The value of private sector investment in overall FTF programs had reached $4M (with overall FTF-Haiti goal of $5M over five years). In 2017, thanks to the FTF-West Chanje Lavi Plante program, an additional $2.7M of private investment was leveraged across three private sector agro-processing partnerships, with additional investment levels expected to be confirmed. * * In 2016, Chanje Lavi Plante trained 150 mango farmers in grafting, pruning and post harvest practices to improve production and commercialization. The project also put in place, in collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture, a mango traceability system to assist mango farmers and exporters in responding to the new export requirement from the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) for the upcoming season. As of June 2017, the program registered more than 6,000 mango Francisque producers. An MOU was also signed with the Ministry of Agriculture to provide trainings to Ministry staff in innovative agricultural techniques. The AREA project has established a legume breeding program, a plant disease and diagnostics program, and a system of training to encourage maize seed production in Haiti; and started a human and institutional capacity development activity at the Ministry of Agriculture.
Improve nutritional status Using a multi-sectoral approach to be coordinated with the USG health strategy, the USG will address nutrition not only by encouraging income growth in rural areas, but also by expanding the GOH’s program for community management of acute malnutrition to all communities where the USG is supporting services. The USG will also support multi-donor efforts along with the GOH to establish early warning systems as part of a nutrition surveillance system, as well as to incorporate water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions into nutrition programming. To reduce food insecurity and vulnerability by supporting the Government of Haiti in establishing a replicable safety net system and expanding capacities to prevent child undernutrition in chronically food insecure communes of North-West, Artibonite, Central Plateau, South-East and Western Departments of Haiti. (As of 9/30/2016) 752,049 pregnant and lactating women, extremely vulnerable people, and children under 5 have been reached by USAID-supported food assistance and nutrition interventions.

In addition, USAID supports the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor through capacity building and assistance in development of a Social Protection Policy. The USAID social safety net program has begun handover of activities to the Ministry in one pilot department.
Child undernutrition has long been a major public health problem in Haiti, although long-term trends show an improvement. The latest Haiti Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), done in 2017, shows wasting at 3.7%, down from 5.1% in 2012 and 10.2% in 2005-6. Underweight rates for 2017 were 9.5%, down from 11.4% in 2012 and 18.1% in 2005-2006. The stunting rate held steady at 21.9% from 2012 to 2017, although there had been a significant improvement from the 2005-2006 rate of 29.4%.

The USAID Kore Lavi program is a six -year Food for Peace social protection initiative supporting the Haitian Government in creating a social safety net for food and nutrition security that prioritizes consumption of locally-grown quality products. The overall goal is to help reduce food insecurity and vulnerability in targeted communities, such as Jacmel, by establishing a replicable safety net system and expanding government capacities to prevent child undernutrition and improve maternal nutritional health among pregnant and lactating women.

The program’s safety net components consist of the distribution of food vouchers for targeted households with children aged five and younger as well as nutrition supplements provided to households with pregnant and/or lactating women. Since its inception in August 2013, the program has provided social assistance to a total of 752,049 people living in 173,557 vulnerable households. As of October 2017, more than 18,000 households are currently enrolled in the safety net program.

In addition, the program also has worked with MAST to establish a vulnerability targeting database (SIMAST) that currently lists over 154,000 households that can be used for future social protection targeting purposes. The SIMAST is hosted and managed by MAST.

The Ranfose Abitid Nitrisyon pou Fe Ogmante Sante (RANFOSE) project aims to address the micronutrient deficiencies in Haiti by using a multi-pronged, participatory approach to stimulate a sustainable national program for fortified staple foods. The project has just started this month.

AKSYON is a five year program that aims to decrease the number of women and children under age five who suffer from malnutrition, reinforcing the sustainability of these gains through knowledge and skills building around nutritional improvements, hygiene, and sanitation, and food security strategies. The project was awarded in August 2016. As of June 2017, 9,399 children under 5 were screened, including 3,337 children 0-23 months as well as 2,146 pregnant/lactating women.
Priority 2: Economic Security – Access to Opportunity
“Support for an enabling policy environment” is now named: “Attracting Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and local investment” * Support GOH reform of regulatory framework. * Increased transparency, modernization, and improved efficiency and effectiveness in revenue collection, budget formulation, budget execution and expenditure tracking and accounting processes.

* Significantly increase foreign direct investments.

* Foreign direct investment (FDI) was $105M in 2016, continuing a steady annual decrease from $170M in 2013, according to the Haitian central bank. USG contributions to the construction of the Caracol Industrial Park and the provision of reliable electricity to the park and surrounding communities in conjunction with another multilateral donor and the GOH continue to be major factors in attracting FDI. Rehabilitation of a port to facilitate shipping for park customers will boost investment. The Help and Hope Legislation is encouraging garment manufacturers to relocate to Haiti. It is expected that such investment will pick up in the medium term since Haiti is likely to benefit from the US withdrawal from the Trans Pacific Partnership. Also there have been significant increases in GOH revenue collection (28% in FY 2017) due in part to improvements in the management of the DGI’s (Direction Generale des Impots, Haiti’s national tax authority) Large Taxpayer Unit and in the software and hardware available to DGI (13 of its 24 remote units will be using the new software by December 31). Efforts to create a Treasury Single Account, which ended on the USG side in March 2017, but continue on the part of the IMF, are helping to reduce discretionary expenditure at the ministry level, a major source of corruption.
* Support GOH in attracting domestic and foreign direct investment.
Technical assistance and professional and vocational training services to micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) Assist informal MSMEs improve their management and governance, register with regulators and tax authorities to become formal enterprises, and access new sources of capital. Promote the agribusiness, apparel, and construction industries by supporting larger “lead” firms in target value chains, strengthening management practices within MSME’s, and providing training for employees and job-seekers. The goal is to create 25,000 net full-time-equivalent jobs by the end of 2015, raise revenues/income within target value chains, and increase industry-specific measures of productivity. The strategy was extended to 2018. As of September 30, 2017, the LEVE project has disbursed over $3.7M (of $5.2M committed to date) to 40 subgrantees. Activities supported more than 774 MSMEs to improve their managerial skills or expand their operations through capital injection. To date, this support has contributed to the creation of 4,341 new jobs.
Offer professional and vocational training programs to MSMEs specializing in agriculture, agribusiness, garment assembly, and construction. As of September 30, 2017, the LEAD activity had awarded 47 sub-grants to SMEs for a total of $7.6M while leveraging an amount of $12.6M in matching grants. This resulted in close to $20M in capital injected in SMEs. This led to 14,032 jobs created and the partner SMEs seeing a more than $30.6M increase in sales over the life of the project.
Increased access to capital, where appropriate, through investments and partial guarantees Improve access to capital by restructuring existing loans to businesses damaged in the earthquake and extending new loans to support MSME growth and expansion. * Increase financing made available to MSMEs through USG-supported interventions through our Development Credit Authority (DCA) and other facilities from a baseline total of $4.05M to $60M in June 2015;

* Facilitate 10M transactions through mobile money systems developed with USG support in previous 6 months.
No update As of September 30, 2017, DCA guarantee agreements since 2004 amounted to $82.5M with a total utilization of $41.6M for 12,366 loans. The OPIC/DIG Liquidity Facility reports, as of Sept 30, 2017, a $17M credit facility to two financial institutions to finance housing and business loans to SMEs. $1.5M has been disbursed to SMEs under these facilities.
PILLAR C: Health and Other Basic Services
Priority 1: Health
Develop comprehensive referral networks (150-250K people per network) at the communal and departmental levels within the USG development corridors Investment in all aspects of the network – including facilities, equipment, training, supplies, and human recourses including community health workers. No change. In order to ensure investments in infrastructure, equipment, and staffing are sustainable, the USG will continue to develop 9 referral networks in a limited capacity and focus resources to fully staff and equip 3 targeted referral networks. Three referral networks are fully staffed. The USG has made available referral tools/protocols–such as referral and counter-referral guidelines–and they are being used by health providers to facilitate patient referrals. The thirty-four health facilities within the three Model Referral Networks (MRN) made a total of 3,783 referrals and counter-referrals allowing these patients to access the appropriate level of care. In this reporting period, the Health Services Delivery project (SSQH) also received approval from the National Ethics Committee of Haiti and the Institutional Review Board of John Hopkins University (JHU-IRB) to conduct a study that will assess the feasibility of the MRN system and protocols from both the health provider and patient perspective. The MRN survey will start at the end of October 2017 and will inform the development of a new model to support the Ministry of Health (MOH) in documenting successes, challenges, and lessons learned.
Support the delivery of a “basic package” of services and targeted infectious disease prevention and management outside the US development corridors Support the delivery of a “basic package” of services, targeted interventions for infectious disease to address gender-based violence and child protection. * All USG service delivery programs will have a transition plan to either the Global Fund, GAVI, or the GOH.

* Significant reductions in pediatric HIV prevalence, TB incidence, % of underweight children, maternal mortality, and cholera fatalities.

* Significant increase in contraceptive usage and percent of children vaccinated.

To plan for transition of programming, the USG signed the Partnership Framework (PF) with the GOH in 2012. The PF reaffirms the commitment by USG to support the GOH in coordinating, overseeing and eventually absorbing health sector activities now so often provided through development partner support. The 2012 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) indicated that since the 2006 DHS, modern contraceptive prevalence increased from 25 to 31%, the percentage of underweight children declined from 22.2 to 11.4%, vaccination coverage has increased from 41 to 45% nationally, but in the areas supported by the USG, 95% of children were vaccinated. The incidence of cholera has been reduced by over 50% since the outbreak in 2010. The newly awarded service delivery project will continue to target the areas mentioned above and will focus on reducing maternal mortality and pediatric HIV and TB incidence, among other USG priority areas. The USG supported the Ministry of Health in building their capacity to provide leadership in managing the country’s health system and health care services. USAID continued to assist the MOH in improving data collection and usage, upgrading internal management systems, managing diverse funding sources, improving its ability to attract, train and retain professional health workers, and improving internal governance, transparency and accountability. USAID increased its support to the MOH in the fight against both vector-borne and water-borne diseases. Part of the Agency’s investments in maternal and child health were focused on community mobilization activities to prevent and detect zika. This was done by involving community leaders, increasing the number of mobile clinics that provide family planning services, and working on behavior change and awareness. Pregnant women received mosquito repellents and community health workers conducted outreach activities to help educate families about zika prevention measures, such as eliminating standing water around households. USAID also made major investments in the area of cholera prevention through home water treatment products to ensure that families have access to clean and potable water, and the Agency, through its WASH activities, is coordinating closely with the GOH national cholera plan. USAID carried out behavior change campaigns on sanitation and hygiene practices that would help prevent disease transmission. The country’s health statistics have seen some significant improvements according to the preliminary results of the Demographic Health Survey 2016-2017. For example, the total fertility rate of 3.0 continued to trend down, declining 14% from 2012 and 38% from 1994. This is critical to Haiti’s long-term development, as the population and pressure on scarce resources has doubled since 1980. Childhood mortality (deaths between age 1 and 5 per 1,000 live births in the last five years) declined by 23% from 2012 (down from 31.0% in 2012 to 24.0% in 2017). Improvements were observed in the proportion of children who are severely underweight (weight-for-age), which declined by 30% from 2012 levels, from 3% to 2.1% in 2017. CDC provides co-financing for routine childhood vaccinations.
Establish disability care to support GOH and civil society capacity to provide care and rehabilitation services for people with disabilities Establishment of service centers to provide surgical interventions, mobility aids, physical rehabilitation, psychosocial and social service support, and vocational programs for persons with disabilities.
Provision of technical assistance to the MOH, Social Affairs and organizations of disabled people to build capacity in developing clear standards, furthering rights and opportunities, and the enforcement of building codes for accessibility to persons with disabilities.
No change. Through the Spinal Cord Injury project, the USG has strengthened the quality and integration of disability services provided by the Haitian medical system and associated partners. We continue to strengthen referral practices within Haiti for persons with a spinal cord related disability who are in need of clinical care and rehabilitation support. Through the project, the USG has mobilized international medical professionals and project staff to provide fundamental training to enhance local institutions’ and medical professionals’ ability to attend to the needs of persons with a spinal cord injury. The USG has continued to strengthen its mutually beneficial working relationship with three key offices of the Government of Haiti including the Haitian Ministry of Health (MSPP), Ministry of Social Affairs and Work (MAST), and the Secretary of State for the Inclusion of Persons with Handicaps (SEIPH). By means of this coordination, the USG has been able to provide input toward the development of national initiatives aimed at facilitating income generation and social/community inclusion among persons with a disability, and contribute to raising community awareness through ongoing radio sessions, newsletters, and ad-hoc events. Through the Spinal Cord Injury project implemented by St. Boniface Hospital in Fonds des Blancs, 446 patients benefited from clinical and/or rehabilitation care. Additionally, the project conducted 8,356 physical therapy sessions for spinal cord injury inpatients. Project beneficiaries self-reported a 65% increase in community reintegration after participation in project community reintegration and mobile clinic services. Handicap International reached 204 children with disabilities through awareness sessions on prevention of HIV, violence and abuse. Fifty one (51) teachers, supervisors, medical and educational staff including IBESR (Institut du Bien être Social et de la Recherche) staff were sensitized through training modules on non-discrimination, protection, detection and care for orphans and vulnerable children including disabled children in the context of HIV. Service Chretien worked with over 600 people with disabilities and trained 250 people (religious leaders, local authorities, members of civil society) on reintegration. Twelve organizations of people with disabilities (DPOs) were trained to ensure people with disabilities know their rights based on the Haitian Constitution, laws and the UN Convention. And a key partner organization successfully engaged the Haitian Parliament to vote on legislation for increased support to disabled persons. USAID also continued to support the Haitian Society for Assistance to Blind Persons (SHAA) to create braille reading materials for blind and visually impaired students.
Increase support to the Ministry of Health in strengthening systems and governance Strengthen MOH systems for information management, disease surveillance, laboratory testing, procurement, maintenance of health supply chain, management of services, and budgeting; assess opportunities to use technology to improve health system performance; improve and expand the capacity of the existing health workforce; recruit and retain health workers; and develop health financing mechanisms. * MOH exercises primary oversight of health service delivery by providing additional USG service delivery through a GOH entity;

* Unified national supply chain and active distribution strategy with a focus on pilot departments and the development corridors;

* Unified and comprehensive platform for data management;

* Integrated MOH budget with GOH and donor funds; and

* A health workforce better aligned to needs.
*Support for service delivery includes introducing the MOH to results-based financing, enabling accountable MOH governance of future projects. The USG is also providing technical assistance to strengthen the MOH contracting function to ensure the effective implementation of the results-based financing model.
* Progress continues towards a unified national supply chain through technical assistance. In January 2016, the plan for the creation of the system (in French, Système National d’Approvisionnement et de Distribution des Intrants de santé (SNADI) was validated by the Health Minister. Based on a USG-funded Supply Chain System Option Analysis, a specific distribution system was selected for the SNADI. The USG is financially supporting the MOH for the hiring and on-the-job training of local consultants who will constitute the SNADI Coordination Unit. This Unit will oversee SNADI implementation and coordinate the management and active distribution of health commodities within the public health sector countrywide.
* To improve health data, the USG is supporting a comprehensive information system in the health sector.
* USAID has supported the first data quality assessment of the information system used to monitor Haiti’s human resources for health leading to the availability of up-to-date, accurate information that can be used to identify gaps so that evidence-based retention and redistribution policies can be developed to address these issues. *USAID continues to provide leadership, management and governance support to the MOH. USAID is actively engaged in strengthening governance and impact of Global Fund resources in Haiti, one third of which are provided globally by the USG.
Results-based financing is ongoing within 29 health facilities. To date, two rounds of payments have been made following verification of results and the third quarter payment request is being finalized by the Ministry of Health.
With the support of the Health Finance and Governance project, the Ministry of Health finalized the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Situational Analysis, a preliminary step towards the drafting of the HRH Strategy. The updates to the health workforce database that USAID supported in prior performance periods were critical to conducting the Analysis. Strengthening the accreditation system, known as Reconnaissance, continued in the performance period.
With the support of the Health Finance and Governance project, the GOH has been completing National Health Accounts for 2013-2014, allowing for a centralized collection and analysis of health data. The GOH also completed the joint costing exercise of the Justinian Hospital to cost its services and is now moving into business planning. This initiative is crucial to the Ministry’s management of key facilities and negotiations with the Executive and Parliament for additional domestic resources for health. However, the development of the Health Finance Strategy has been slowed by the change in administrations within the GOH.

The Leadership Management and Governance (LMG/Haiti) project ended in September 2017; support was transitioned to the Health Finance and Governance project. During the final quarter of the LMG/Haiti project, the project provided technical assistance to the Direction d’Organisation des Services de Santé (DOSS) to continue “Paquet Essentiel de Services” (PES) implementation by initiating the process of estimating pilot costs in three departments and identifying equipment needs within these networks, and to the HIV/TB committee by participating in technical meetings and providing tools to help them better manage the programs, such as templates for field visit reports. Strengthening these basic services will enable more families to receive appropriate care in their communities and decrease the burden on already over-taxed and more costly tertiary care facilities. LMG also assisted the Unité de Coordination des Programmes (UCP) Executive Directorate to draft the preface for the coordination manual and obtain the Minister’s signature. The project printed 200 copies of the finalized manual and gave them to the UCP for distribution and use with their staff and partners. USAID is actively engaged in strengthening governance and impact of Global Fund resources in Haiti, one third of which are provided globally by the USG. LMG/Haiti supported the Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM-Haiti) and the Principal Recipient (PR) to complete the first phase of the 2018-2020 HIV/TB grant making cycle by providing technical assistance to develop all programmatic and budgetary details for the funding request, respond to requests for clarification from the Global Fund Secretariat, and reach agreement with the Global Fund Secretariat on the final grant budget.

*Two years ago, USAID successfully consolidated its supply chain operations for HIV/AIDS and family planning, which were formerly managed by two different implementing partners. In addition, the distribution activities were sub-contracted to three local Haitian private sector organizations (“third party logistics” or 3PL). This warehousing consolidation and outsourced distribution are more efficient and cost effective. Lessons learned from the restructuring were presented to the MOH and interested partners as a model for the future integration of all existing supply chains for health commodities, a milestone in the creation of a national system for the GOH. In 2016, in the context of reinforcing the national supply chain system, USG consolidated its warehousing and distribution operations with the new Global Fund Principal Recipient for HIV/AIDS. This year, further supply chain integration is being sought with the GF-funded Tuberculosis and Malaria programs as well as UNFPA. *With USAID support, the MOH will continue to expand the Unique National Health Information System (SISNU) platform to all health facilities and covering almost aspect of the routine health statistics. An emphasis is currently being placed on the data quality and completeness ensuring that MOH has a more complete view of the status of the health facilities and clients frequenting the health systems. This includes integration of data from the community level for key areas of the portfolio, beginning with immunization and tuberculosis, into the SISNU platform.* CDC supported the MOH to establish a National Sentinel Site Surveillance (NSSS) system in 51 sites in 2010 to monitor disease trends and detect outbreaks. Since 2010, NSSS (now NESN, National Epidemiologic Surveillance Network) has expanded to 645 sites (out of approximately 1050 health facilities across the country) and produces weekly reports on the number of cases for 47 conditions, 14 of which are immediately reportable. There are ongoing efforts to improve the functioning of this system by improving software platforms and refining case definitions. In addition, CDC continues to provide technical assistance to the Directorate of Epidemiology, Laboratory, and Research (DELR) as they implement a phased expansion of NESN to include all health facilities within the surveillance system.

* Since 2011, CDC Haiti has worked with the GOH to increase the capacity of the local public health workforce through the Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP). Before the introduction of the FETP, there was no formal training in public health or epidemiology in Haiti. FETP builds the skills of the MOH staff to better prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease threats. To date, over 300 FETP residents have graduated and remain in careers with the Ministry of Health — including 181 basic-level residents, 50 frontline residents, 86 intermediate-level residents, and five advanced-level residents. Overall, the graduates continue to reinforce the country’s public health system through their activities and services to the MOH. Currently, three out of ten Regional Health Directors in Haiti are FETP graduates.

* CDC works closely with the National Public Health Laboratory (LNSP) to build and expand laboratory capacity in Haiti. Diagnostic capacity for TB and MDR-TB continues to grow — additional GeneXpert sites were operationalized in 2017, bringing the current number of sites to 28, and the rollout of fluorescence microscopy (FM) has steadily increased from six sites at the beginning of FY14 to 55 sites today. LNSP has assumed training and management of the GeneXpert and FM networks from international NGOs. The National Specimen Referral Network (NSRN), which transports specimen collected from the ten departments to LNSP for testing, has expanded to 208 sites across all ten departments and includes PRESEPI (a laboratory-enhanced surveillance system) samples, sputum samples for GeneXpert testing, and dried blood spot samples for viral load testing.
Rebuild and reform management of public health infrastructure Renovate earthquake-damaged structures in the PaP metropolitan area as well as filling critical facility gaps within communal referral networks in the development corridors. No change. *Construction of the pediatric ward of Justinien hospital is complete and has been transferred to the GOH.
*Work on the National Campus of Health Sciences is substantially complete and has been officially transferred to the GOH.
*Construction at The State University Hospital (HUEH) is underway. As of September 30, 2017, the project was about 75% complete. The earliest expected end date is mid-2018.
*Construction of the pediatric ward of Justinien hospital is complete and has been transferred to the GOH.
*Work on the National Campus of Health Sciences is substantially complete and has been officially transferred to the GOH.
*Construction at The State University Hospital (HUEH) is underway. As of September 30, 2017, the project was about 75% complete. The earliest expected end date is mid-2018.
*A total of nine health clinic facilities and nine schools (3 in FY17, 6 in previous FYs) have been renovated to provide better health care and universal access for disabled people.
*Surveys were completed on 29 medical clinics, the design documents were also completed for eleven medical clinics and the 12th (Hinche Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Medical Facility – MDRTB) will be completed in the winter of 2017.
*The construction contract to renovate eleven Hurricane-damaged clinics and Hinche MDRTB will be awarded late 2017 or early 2018.
Priority 2: Education and Youth-Focused Services
Improve the GOH’s capacity to plan, coordinate, regulate, and deliver quality education services. Build GOH capacity and establish standards in the areas of school licensing and in-service teacher training, including through technical assistance to the Ministry of Education (MOE). Provide technical assistance to build the capacity of the Ministry of Education to foster public-private partnerships and to assist in the licensing and accreditation of schools. USAID will assist the MOE with co-design of an evidence-based, bilingual (Creole and French), scripted early grade reading and writing curriculum for grades one through four, suitable for lesser-trained teachers to successfully implement. The program will also assist with in-service training for teachers and other educational personnel to implement these new materials and ongoing coaching to improve teacher skills. Many other donor programs and non-public school networks have expressed strong interest in adopting this approach and classroom materials, based on initial assessments of reading progress among children. Once approved by the MOE, those other school networks are expected to roll out these materials to hundreds more schools across Haiti (mostly using their own funds), greatly multiplying the reach of USG resources. The early grade reading program is implemented through a combination of strategically selected “bridge” activities until the next longer-term USAID project is designed and launched. Implementers were selected for their technical strengths and ability to leverage strong working relationships with the government of Haiti. USAID has completed co-design of grade one classroom materials in close collaboration with the MOE and has begun work on the grade two curriculum. These materials are strongly evidence-based, bilingual (Creole and French), scripted early grade reading and writing curriculum for grades one through four, suitable for Haiti’s majority lesser-trained teachers to successfully implement. USAID will directly support material distribution and teacher and staff training and ongoing coaching in roughly 430 schools. Initial assessments of student progress in reading show that these materials are highly effective in Haiti, and several other donors and school networks have already begun using earlier versions of grade one materials and plan to reproduce and implement the newly revised curriculum this school year. USAID is also working to strengthen the capacity of the MOE to design and roll out curriculum materials and better supervise teachers on its own.
Facilitate public private partnerships to support offers of assistance for education and youth-focused projects To create connections for private entities interested in working in or funding education projects in Haiti through the use of tools such as the Global Development Alliance (PPP Seed Money). Provide more than 28,000 children and 900 teachers with innovative reading curricula that meet international standards for literacy instruction. USAID has established a GDA in partnership with the W. K. Kellogg Foundation and Porticus through the University of Notre Dame, engaging USAID funds as well as $6M in private resources. This partnership brings to bear the excellent academic and research capabilities of Notre Dame to validate the technical effectiveness of the scripted lesson approach to reading in the Haiti context, as well as direct implementation and monitoring of the roll-out of these materials in the network of Catholic schools across Haiti. These organizations have also raised interest among other potential private partners to co-finance early grade reading education in Haiti. USAID has established a GDA in partnership with the W. K. Kellogg Foundation and Porticus through the University of Notre Dame, engaging USAID funds as well as $6M in private resources. This alliance supports overall, 360 schools to utilize the early grade reading and writing curriculum co-designed by the MOE and USAID, and trains teachers and school personnel in the use of this curriculum. The alliance provides in-classroom coaching services to teachers implementing the curriculum, and provides for classroom libraries and training in differentiated instructional techniques using the libraries. USAID’s investment directly supports 160 of the 360 partner schools. Knowledge, resources, and best practices are shared across all GDA partners in the areas of curriculum implementation, teacher training and coaching, socio-emotional learning, community engagement, remedial instruction, and student performance. To date, this program has reached 21,431 children and 438 teachers.
Increase provision of complementary youth-focused services in targeted communities within the development corridors. Build on post-disaster classroom construction efforts to Non-formal basic education for out-of-school youth Objective 3 as envisioned in the USG Strategy is not being implemented under the Education program. Workforce development activities will be funded within Pillar B: Economic Security.
Objective 3 as envisioned in the USG Strategy is not being implemented under the Education program. Workforce development activities will be funded within Pillar B: Economic Security..
PILLAR D: Governance and Rule of Law
Priority 1: Governance
Support Credible Electoral and Legislative Processes * Provide long-term technical assistance to electoral institutions, and build capacity for civic education and electoral observation;

* Provide support to Parliament to represent constituent interests, oversee GOH reconstruction efforts, and draft and enact reform legislation.

* Permanent electoral council operational and able to execute elections with minimal international assistance;
* Electoral results returned faster and more accurately;
* Greater % of elections expenses funded by GOH;
* Parliament capable of operating transparently, according to set procedures and within budgetary limits;
* Increased level of ongoing dialogue with citizens maintained;
* Increased % of reform legislation passed.
* The 1987 constitution introduced Haiti’s electoral administration system which mandated that transitional elections be administered by a provisional council until a permanent electoral council (CEP) could be established. Three decades later, Haiti has seen some 20 provisional CEPs come and go. Absent a permanent elections council, the GOH did name another Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) in March 2016, which successfully held long overdue Presidential and Parliamentary elections in November 2016 and January 2017, respectively. In mid-2017, each of the three branches of Haiti’s national government – Executive, Legislative, and Judicial – began the process of nominating members to the country’s first permanent CEP. As of November 2017, the nominating process is still on-going, so the 2016 provisional CEP continues in place.
Ongoing programs are working to build greater confidence in the electoral process by supporting Haitian-led efforts to strengthen electoral institutions, political parties, and civil society to advocate for and institute much-needed electoral and political reforms.
* Haiti finally passed two important milestones, holding a series of credible elections in November 2016 and January 2017 that allowed a newly elected President and one-third of the Senate and more that 5,000 local government officials to be seated in early 2017. The elections brought to an end the electoral gridlock that had lasted for years, during which citizens grew weary of repeated electoral crises and sometimes violent demonstrations.
* The United States contributed more than $36M for Haiti’s most recent extended elections cycle (August 2015 – January 2017), predominantly to support operations and logistics. Of this amount, over $33M was programmed by USAID and was used to: provide technical assistance to Haitian electoral institutions; support election observations; build capacity for political parties and civic education; and support election process logistics and security. With USAID support: more than 200 election officials received training to strengthen their ability to effectively manage the electoral process; a civil society coalition deployed over 1,500 domestic observers for each round of elections; nearly 5.6M individuals received civic and voter education training.
* The current Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) made strides during the latest set of elections to improve the transparency and effectiveness of the process, and observers noted improved organization from poll workers. The elections also saw relatively few incidences of violence or voter intimidation. Haitian analysts view CEP’s management of the recent elections as the most transparent and effective in years. Critics who alleged the “massive fraud” that fatally discredited the October 2015 presidential elections have endorsed or at least agreed in principle that the 2016 process was acceptable. CEP leaders have also expressed interest in moving electoral reforms, including establishing a permanent electoral council, by mobilizing popular support, educating key political decision-makers, and contributing to legislative reform proposals. Still, the current CEP faces significant obstacles in building its technical capacity and overcoming a pervasive lack of trust in elections. Despite the procedural success of the vote, only 10% of eligible voters cast ballots in the final presidential race, suggesting widespread disillusionment with the country’s institutions and leaders and highlighting the deep challenges facing Haiti’s fragile democracy.
* The recent elections also underscored the weakness and fragmentation of Haitian political parties, as evidenced by the dozens of presidential candidates who ran in the failed 2015 elections and the 2016 repeat of presidential elections. Many parties lack a grassroots base and youth and women generally participate only marginally. Despite the 30% constitutional quota, only four of 121 seats in the parliament are held by women, a decrease from the previous legislature. Fragmentation has also created parties that lack clear ideologies or policy platforms. Moreover, candidates are often self-financed and have weak or no party loyalties once elected.
Strengthen Public Administration and Financial Accountability * Provide technical assistance, staff, training and capacity building to key GOH institutions;

* Create a Fellows Program to contribute to transparent, effective public administration in key GOH Ministries.

* Financial Management Systems functioning across 41 GOH entities and expanding to regional and municipal levels, with at least 50% of GOH revenues and expenditures tracked by the system.
* Improvement in World Bank Effectiveness and Transparency International (TI) Corruption Perception Index scores.
* GOH financial management systems meet USG direct funding qualifications.
* Targeted GOH institutions demonstrate improved capacity to plan, strategize and measure results of operations.
* Information-based tax administration increases domestic tax revenue by 3% of GDP.
*Support efforts to raise the low revenue productivity of the tax system by procurement of an integrated tax administration IT system, promotion of voluntary compliance, and improved capability in taxpayer audit.
*Support the development of strengthened budget process and Treasury Single Account.
* Assist in developing legal and regulatory framework for effective insurance sector oversight.
* Improve MEF’s ability to manage its cash and debt issuance needs.
*As of November 2014, the Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS) activity was being used in 48 offices throughout the Government of Haiti, primarily at the ministerial level in Port-au-Prince. A new IFMS activity involving installation of an interface to allow connectivity between the GOH revenue and expenditures systems and expansion to regional and municipal levels was awarded in September 2014. *USAID supports the Ministry of Economy and Finance (MEF) to improve public financial management, procurement systems, access controls, and file management for its internal network, which is used by more than 300 MEF employees.
* USAID supports the Office of Management and Human Resources (OMRH) to improve technical expertise and human resource management within national government ministries and agencies.
* Haiti’s score on TI’s Corruption Perception Index improved slightly from 2011 to 2016 from a score of 18 to 20, and from a rank of 175th to 159th worldwide. Haiti’s score on the World Bank’s governance indicators similarly saw a slight improvement over five of six key governance indicators over that time frame; the index of government effectiveness, however, declined after 2013.
*The Large Taxpayer Office implemented an audit plan resulting in increased audit assessments. *From October 2016 through March 2017, the General Directorate of Taxes increased its revenue collections by 10.7% over the same six-month period in the previous year, equivalent to approximately US$25 million.
* Haiti made progress toward implementing a Treasury Single Account by identifying and closing bank accounts (in process) under the control of the Treasury, creating a database for all TSA accounts, and developing a TSA banking structure for implementation by the Bank of the Republic of Haiti (BRH). Further progress is impeded by BRH banking system inadequacies and inability to acquire prior actual data from BRH for cash flow projections.
* Preliminary work has been completed with respect to the establishment of a basic regulatory and prudential framework for insurance sector oversight, but legislation needs to be enacted detailing MEF’s oversight responsibilities and providing the legal basis for the establishment of the new Supervisory Agency for Insurance. In the interim, progress has been made on capacity building and training of newly hired staff.
*The Debt Department is nearly staffed, staff assignments and responsibilities are in place, and a Debt Department procedures manual has been drafted. The BRH has reduced its issuance by more than 50% to accommodate MEF issues.
* In 2017, the USAID funded IFMS project completed the renovation of the Ministry of Finance (MEF) Network Operation Center (NOC) and equipped it with state of the art servers; repaired 20 IFMS network sites and started installing new communication equipment; developed two Unified Exchange Platform (UXP) web services for five institutions to allow for the exchange of information more efficiently and securely; connected ten municipalities’ tax collection operations with the central Tax Authority Office (DGI) office; connected two regional Supreme Audit Institutions (CSCCA) offices with the DGI central office to facilitate the audit of municipal finances; provided IT equipment to thirteen regional DGI sites to connect them to the central office; and developed new functionalities for the Human Resources Management System (SIGRH) including the on-boarding of new civil servants, monthly affirmation, career management, and a payroll interface with the Treasury.
*USAID supported OMRH to develop human resource management tools, including a computer database to keep track of government employees and their movements within Civil Service, a recruitment guide for the government of Haiti to ensure the transparent recruitment of highly-qualified civil servants, a recruitment platform for the GOH, and a finger print time and attendance system at the OMRH. During the fourth quarter of FY 2017, in line with the Government of Haiti’s (GOH) new roadmap and envisioned results, USAID’s KONEKTE project continued to support activities related to the GOH’s objectives including the extension of contracts for certain KONEKTE supported Technical Advisors’(TAs’). This assistance was tailored to reinforce the OMRH, selected GOH Ministries, and Public-Sector Organizations’ capacities to effectively carry out their current mandates.
Improving Local Governance Capacity * Provide technical assistance to support local government planning, budgeting and management capacity.

* Develop synergies between existing long-term USAID local government programs and community stabilization projects implemented by USAID/OTI.

* Increased levels of citizen confidence in local government within the development corridors.

* Emergence of capable local governments that sustainably collect increased tax revenue and re-invest those funds in citizen-prioritized public services.

* Local governments demonstrate improved disaster planning.

* Legislative framework for decentralization drafted, passed and implementation begun.

* USAID continued support to the GOH to deliver services to citizens, as well as the ability of local governments to generate revenue.
* USAID and the Department of Defense have worked closely with the Civil Protection Directorate (DPC)—to build capacity of the network of departmental and municipal emergency committees through training and technical assistance, provision of equipment, and related interventions. The DPC now better performs its coordination role at both central and departmental levels. Ten SOUTHCOM-constructed Emergency Operation Centers (EOC) (one in each Department) were completed during FY 2013 and transferred to the DPC, or will be completed soon.
* Since FY 2011, USG-supported disaster simulation exercises took place in several departments and Port-au-Prince annually, reinforcing disaster response capacity in preparation for hurricane seasons. The USG supports GOH partners and donors to continue to test and improve response capacity at the national, departmental, and communal levels. Thirty-two communities in FY 2013 were fitted with Early Warning systems linked to a response system in place as a result of USG assistance.
Through its governance activity, LOKAL+, USAID helped increase transparency, oversight, and accountability of local government offices by strengthening the capacity of nine target municipalities. LOKAL+ helped increase local tax collection through property surveys of small and medium enterprises, training of fiscal services personnel in the partner communes, and communication campaigns. In addition, LOKAL+ worked to increase local and central government coordination, and the Ministry of Interior is now capable, through a task force of 19 people, to install the innovative tax and budget management software CIVITAX in local governments. LOKAL+ also initiated a study to assess the number of communes that can increase revenue from fees, permits and license, as well as strengthen civil society in six targeted municipalities through consultative committees. These committees hold local governments accountable through public hearings on the allocation of local revenues, the prioritization and implementation of community projects, and the presentation of the municipal budget and plans.
*With USAID assistance, nine targeted municipalities conducted tax censuses and launched a “Pay Your Taxes” public information campaign. As a result, the municipalities collected a total of 652,042,037 Haitian gourdes from October 1, 2016 – August 31, 2017, which represents a 28% increase from the revenues collected during the previous fiscal year.
* In spite of these achievements, municipalities faced significant challenges. As FY 2016 began without a functioning Haitian parliament, Haiti’s national budget was passed by presidential decree. Provisions included two articles that negatively impacted revenue collection from the two principal taxes upon which Haiti’s communes largely depend: the business tax and the property tax. Both articles in the decree were included without consultation with the Tax Authority (DGI in French). In 2017, the first two meetings between Members of Parliament (MPs) and mayors (held the last day of June and the first day of July), as well as regular LOKAL+ contact with individual parliamentarians, have together begun to improve the understanding of the different roles mayors and MPs play. There is now a growing percentage of MPs who recognize that as decentralization advances development in Haiti, there will be ample opportunity to reap political credit for the change. With the emergent political will that LOKAL+ is helping to evoke, the project is facing an unprecedented window of opportunity. A decentralization framework law and a law creating a local Civil Service are currently on this year’s legislative agenda.
Priority 2: Rule of Law
Strengthen judicial independence and operational capacity of the courts * Support with other donors the rebuilding and supply of equipment to the Ministry of Justice and Public Security (MJPS) and courts;
* Support the re-implementation of manual case registry systems;* Support with other donors the development of civil registries and a national criminal database, and training to implement the system.
* Rebuild Ministry of Justice and Public Security offices, and Haitian judicial system functions efficiently and independently over time;
* Train judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and other justice sector personnel on using the new criminal codes, once passed;
* Maintain and expand existing legal aid centers to new localities;
* Reduce the average number of days for a case to go to trial;
* Reduce pretrial detention in targeted jurisdictions by 20%;
* Increase the number of land tenure cases resolved through the court system;
* Increased citizen confidence in the criminal and civil justice systems as measured by public opinion surveys.
* Through its Rule of Law program, USAID continued to support the High Judicial Council (CSPJ), which administers, controls, and disciplines the court system, including vetting and assigning judges. CSPJ also monitors judicial corruption, defines standards of conduct, and penalizes judges who are not in compliance. USAID’s assistance was provided to the CSPJ’s Vetting Commission through an embedded adviser and the logistical support to help conduct on-site vetting missions in selected jurisdictions. As a result, the vetting commission was able to investigate 52 files that were submitted to the CSPJ for final review and vetting. USAID also supported the first electronic case management system in the court and prosecutor’s office of Cap Haitian, which will enable more transparent processing of criminal cases by allowing judicial officers to track the status of pending cases and will enable better oversight of movement or lack of movement on cases, which might be related to alleged bribery or other corruption. *With technical support from USAID, final drafts of the new criminal procedure code and penal code were submitted to the Council of Ministers in 2012, and with continued USG support, revised code drafts were completed in February 2016. In April 2017, the Ministry of Justice presented the draft codes to Parliament, where the codes are now under review by the Senate Justice Committee before coming up for a vote in both Chambers. The new President, Jovenel Moise, has stated his support for their approval by parliament. In August 2017, the USAID-funded Judicial Sector Strengthening Project (JSSP) provided assistance to the Professional Association of Judges (APM) for a workshop to provide judges from around the country an opportunity to provide comments on the draft penal code and draft penal procedural code, which are still before Parliament.
USAID also continued its support to the CSPJ through technical and logistical support to the CSPJ’s Judicial Inspection Unit (JIU). This support enabled the JIU to conduct two disciplinary inspections, two routine inspections, and courtesy visits to eight District Courts. This effort will be continued and institutionalized so that it is sustained over time. Moreover, in FY2017 USAID’s technical assistance to the MOJ led to the adoption of the draft Council of Ministers bill on legal assistance and the vote of that bill by the Senate a few months later. That legal assistance bill defines a GoH legal aid system similar to a public defender’s office to help provide free legal assistance to people who can’t afford the high cost of legal services. * INL assistance enhanced oversight and professionalization of Haiti’s justice sector through a grant program intended to support and bolster a Judicial Inspection Unit to ensure proper oversight of judges. INL completed a partially-existing security wall around the Magistrate’s School, Haiti’s training facility for judges. This grant ended on March 31, 2017.
* INL awarded a grant to support the Judicial Inspection Unit (JIU) within the CSPJ, which is responsible for overseeing judges and addressing their misconduct. The project increased the transparency, quality, and number of adjudicated cases in Haiti by holding judges accountable for their professional conduct, integrity, and quality of work. The grant ended on March 31, 2017.
• An ongoing INL program provides cross-sector training to the police and justice sector actors on basic and specialized skills, including evidence collection, proper investigative techniques, reporting, case preparation, sexual- and gender-based violence, trafficking in persons, kidnapping, anti-corruption, and money laundering. INL has trained more than 2,259 justice sector actors since the earthquake.
* Prolonged pre-trial detention and severe overcrowding in inadequate facilities have created a human rights problem for Haitian prison inmates. In FY 2016 in the justice sector, the USAID-funded project continued to support local judicial authorities to reduce illegal and prolonged pretrial detention at the Pétionville Women’s Prison, the National Prison, and the prisons of Croix des Bouquets, St. Marc, Cap Haitien, and Fort Liberté. These prisons saw a reduction in the level of illegal pre-trial detention due to improved capacity to review and prioritize cases, to procedurally advance cases, to obtain the release of illegally detained individuals before trial, and to achieve the release of convicted detainees held illegally beyond their court-ordered release dates. In FY2017 USAID supported special intensive hearings at the Port-au-Prince District Court in conjunction with the new Minister of Justice’s “Prevention of Pre-Trial Detention Plan”. Through that initiative, 130 detainees who were in prolonged pre-trial detention were convicted, 51 were acquitted, including one individual detained since 2006 (129 months), 132 were released (without a trial, following assistance at the police station or at the Peace Court), and the cases of 172 others were moved toward final disposition. The average time spent in pretrial detention for these individuals is 57 months (4.7 years). USAID also provided a sub-grant to the Federation of Haitian Bar Associations to support a special legal assistance program in areas affected by Hurricane Matthew. The grant enables citizens to obtain or replace civic registry documents such as national identification cards, birth and death certificates, and land property titles. During this reporting period 1,872 (884 men/988 women) beneficiaries have requested assistance through this special program.
*Alongside the important support USAID provided to judicial actors to improve legal services to prisoners, USAID’s Health through Walls (HTW) activity provided lifesaving health services to prisoners in the National Penitentiary, the Women’s prison, and the prisons of Cap Haitian, Central Plateau and the Les Cayes. HTW supported voluntary HIV counseling, testing, care and treatment; tuberculosis screenings; and training and support for peer education on health promotion and sanitation practices. In FY 2016, the program tested over 20,821 prisoners and families of prisoners for HIV/AIDS, resulting in the treatment of more than 700 prisoners for HIV/AIDS, as well as the detection and treatment of seven cases of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB).
* The period of performance for the Judicial Inspection Unit (JIU)-related project grant ended on 3/31/17. The program implemented the following key activities from its inception in 2013 until March 2017: (a) provided extensive assistance to the High Judicial Council (CSPJ) towards the establishment of a functional and sustainable Judicial Inspection Unit (JIU); (b) helped draft a code of ethics for the judiciary; (c) helped design all of the inspection toolkits that the JIU needed to conduct inspection visits; (d) trained eleven inspectors through the program; (e) provided on-site mentoring to inspectors during inspection missions and supported the JIU with a total of 10 routine inspections and two follow-up inspections across the country; and (f) provided material support to the JIU with the purchase of equipment for all JIU members.
* The project grant that provided cross-sector training to police and justice sector actors ended on 3/31/17. The program implemented the following key activities from March 2011 until March 2017: (a) conducted a total of 74 trainings for a total of 3,442 participants over the life of the program, (b) supported ongoing code reforms by working with key stakeholders in socializing, gathering feedback, providing comparative examples, ultimately updating and finalizing drafts of new penal and penal procedure codes; (c) created and supported three specialized mentoring groups on TIP, Financial crimes and pre-trial detention leading to the first ever conviction in a corruption case as well as first ever TIP conviction in Haiti; (d) created a pilot program to decrease pretrial detention in the Petionville and Delmas police stations and decreased pretrial detention by 95% and 90%; (e) helped the Ministry of Justice and Public Security improve its oversight capacity.
Enhance the efficiency of the criminal justice system * Support the implementation of reformed criminal and procedure codes, contingent upon meaningful GOH justice sector reform;

* Support citizen access to legal services through support for legal assistance centers for low-income and marginalized communities.
Enhance the efficiency of the civil justice system * Support GOH to improve access to key civil justice services for most vulnerable populations;
* Support efforts to resolve land tenure disputes.
Increase protection of human rights and vulnerable persons * Partner with GOH and civil society organizations to provide for procedures and capacity to protect vulnerable populations and civil liberties.
* Support human rights training for GOH law enforcement and justice sector agencies and personnel.
* Support the development and implementation of human rights monitoring and tracking systems, assistance to victims of abuse, and reformed legal frameworks.
* Train and support the Haitian National Police’s Minors Protection Brigade.
* Support mechanisms to report abuses and public information campaigns on prevention of violence against vulnerable populations.
* Support projects that strengthen GOH capacity to identify and respond to human trafficking.
* Reduce the number of children being sent from target areas to become restaveks and increase public awareness of the plight of restavek children and the number who are rescued.
* Increase capacity of law enforcement officials to investigate and prosecute human trafficking cases.
* Reduce the number of at risk children and youth who participate in organized crime.
* Increased citizen confidence in human rights institutions and protections as measured by Americas Barometer.
* Enable the Haitian National Police’s Minors Protection Brigade to cover more than 50% of Haiti’s population.
* Expand network of vulnerable population service providers that offer services in major development corridors of the country.
* GOH ratifies international protocols on trafficking and child protection and creates a framework for their practical implementation to reduce trafficking and protect vulnerable populations.
* Ensuring the meaningful participation and protection of women and girls in Haiti is critical to achieving long-term development objectives. The 2010 earthquake exposed and exacerbated vulnerabilities among many segments of the Haitian population particularly for women, children, and youth. In a context defined by government incapacity and limited resources, the threat of forced labor, sexual exploitation, gender-based violence and other forms of abuse increases for at-risk women, children, and youth. To date, the GOH has been unable to respond adequately to these threats. * While the GOH has signed a number of international human rights conventions aimed at combating these forms of abuse, and has also criminalized rape and sexual assault through a 2005 amendment to the criminal code, the ability to enforce such conventions and laws remains limited, due to the absence of implementing regulations and policy and limited government capacity. * The disability law passed in 2012 caused the GOH to evaluate and close orphanages not meeting minimum care standards; a compilation of laws related to protection of minors was published; and a hotline to report abuse or trafficking of minors was created. USAID has supported several trainings for various actors including judges, social agents from IBESR and the Ministry of women conditions on the application of the 2012 law. Also IBESR has developed an interim care guidelines for handicapped children in residential care centers. USAID welcomes the fact that the the State Secretary for integration of Disabled people was reappointed by the new government. His dynamism and leadership are key to the sector. * In FY 2013, the USG worked with GOH law enforcement officials through modules addressing gender-based violence (GBV) included in the USG’s training program for HNP and judiciary personnel, and prioritization recruitment of female police cadets in INL’s HNP training programs and funded overseas training for ten female cadets. * Public trust in the Haitian National Police (HNP) registered a small but significant increase from 2010 to 2012 (America’s Barometer), from 51.5% to 55.2%. Thirty-eight HNP officers graduated from Community Policing pilot training, instructed by NYPD mentors, and the HNP community policing unit has grown to more than 80 officers. This technique has enabled the HNP to form better relations with local communities. * In August 2014, the GOH enacted Haiti’s first legislation specifically outlawing trafficking in persons. The Department of State trained judicial personnel on trafficking issues and provided technical expertise to the parliamentary staff drafting the law. • INL funded the participation of two HNP curriculum developers in the International Police and Education and Training Program (IPET) on improving Police Response to Crimes Against Marginalized Groups. Working with the International Association of Chiefs of Police, mentors from Washington, DC Metro Police and Miami Beach Police Department, the HNP developed a new training curriculum to raise awareness among cadets about the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender community and protection of human rights. The HNP delivered the training module to approximately 1000 recruits at the police academy. The new curriculum has been incorporated into basic training for all HNP school classes. *INL assistance supported an embedded mentor in the HNP’s Women’s Affairs department on combatting gender-based violence. The Haitian government and international community made limited progress in addressing human rights in 2017. Political stalemates, resource constraints, and weak government institutions continued to hinder GOH efforts to meet the basic needs of its people and address long-standing huma rights problems. Conditions of extreme vulnerability persist among many citizens, especially women, children; the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community; and persons with disabilities. A number of USAID-funded activities supported awareness raising and advocacy on human rights issues, including improving protection of vulnerable populations targeting civil society organizations and marginalized populations. * Haiti’s primary challenge associated with the protection of children in adversity is overcoming a legacy of ineffective legal institutions with inadequate resources and a disregard for protection of the most vulnerable. In FY 2017, the U.S. Government (USG) continued to support activities that contributed to advancing the implementation of the USG Action Plan for Children in Adversity (APCA) in Haiti. However, state institutions, international partners, and local organizations involved in child protection continue to face a severe lack of resources and inadequate capacity to establish proper prevention and response mechanisms to address the needs of Haiti’s most vulnerable children. To help reduce pretrial detention and prison overcrowding in FY2017 USAID supported a series of special intensive hearings at the Port-au-Prince District Court in conjunction with the new Minister of Justice’s “Prevention of Pre-Trial Detention Plan”. Through that initiative, 130 detainees who were in prolonged pre-trial detention were convicted, 51 were acquitted, including one individual detained since 2006 (129 months), 132 were released (without a trial, following assistance at the police station or at the Peace Court), and the cases of 172 others were moved toward final disposition. The average time spent in pretrial detention for these individuals is 57 months (4.7 years). Unfortunately this activity could not achieve more results due to the various strikes in the justice system. These judicial strikes started since July 2017 and have yet stopped as this report is being written. USAID also provided a sub-grant to the Federation of Haitian Bar Associations to support a special legal assistance program in areas affected by Hurricane Matthew. The grant enables citizens to obtain or replace civic registry documents such as national identification cards, birth and death certificates, and land property titles. In FY2017 1,872 (884 men/988 women) beneficiaries have requested assistance through this special program.
* In an effort to address APCA’s Objective 4, ‘Strengthen Child Welfare and Protection Systems’ and Objective 5, ‘Promote Evidence-based Policies and Programs’, in 2016 USAID awarded support for an innovative three-year Alliance for the Protection of Children (APC) project implemented by American Institutes for Research (AIR). The project supports implementation of the Haitian National Child Protection Strategy (SNPE) and works in partnership with the Haitian government child welfare agency the Institut du Bien-Être Social et de Recherches (IBESR). It also works closely with key local partners, including the Université d’Etat d’Haiti (UEH), Zanmi Lasante, Combite pour la paix et le développement, and Restavek Freedom, other government ministries, strategic United Nations agencies such as UNICEF and UNHCR, and community-based and local non-governmental organizations in Haiti. The project will advance child protection to reduce violence against children, mitigate trafficking and forced labor of children, protect unaccompanied and separated migrants, stateless and refugee children, integrate street children into safer learning and care spaces, and prevent the separation of children from their families and explore alternative care and protection services.
* USAID supported the local organization Initiative for Equitable Development in Haiti (IDEH) to help LGBT organizations to better advocate for and assert their rights, including building awareness of the various forms of sexual and gender-based violence and developing support mechanisms for survivors. IDEH implements activities to promote women’s rights and empowerment and advance the rights of sexual minorities, including training on gender discrimination and sexual harassment. Through an INL developed police school curriculum, Haitian police cadets continued to receive specific instruction on LGBTI issues, hate crimes, and the protection of vulnerable populations
Renovate the Corrections Sector Build and refurbish correction facilities No Changes • INL assistance supported the award of construction contracts to build three new prison facilities to contribute to a reduction in overcrowding and resultant security and disease threats to detainees.

• INL funds supported equipment and training for Haitian prison personnel to more effectively manage prisons, vocational training for some of the inmate population, and supported an embedded mentor with the Director of HNP Corrections (DAP).
INL is supporting the GOH’s efforts to create a more humane and efficient correctional system. To alleviate overcrowding, INL completed construction of new facilities in Cabaret and Fort Liberte, and were turned over to the Haitian government in FY16. INL is completing a prison in Petit-Goave and it will be turned over to the Haitian Government in 2017. INL completed a prison in Hinche jointly with the UN Office for Project Services (UNOPS). INL is working with the HNP to increase the number of officers assigned to the Prison Service. The HNP’s leadership has committed to assigning 10% of the graduating officers from each promotion to the Prison Service. Nearly 50 Department of Prison Administration (DAP) officers visited the U.S. on INL-supported training with the Maryland Corrections Department, receiving instruction on defensive tactics, transportation of prisoners, and disturbance control. Learning from prison escapes in 2013 and 2014, INL will work with MINUJUSTH and other donors to address weaknesses in the prisons through enhanced training and mentoring of DAP officers. INL continued to provide an embedded expert with the head of the corrections department (DAP). INL completed a 300-bed prison in Fort Liberte in August 2016 and will finish construction of the prison at Petit Goave in 2017. INL completed a prison in Hinche jointly with the UN Office for Project Services (UNOPS). INL continued to provide an embedded expert with the head of the corrections department (DAP).
Develop a sustainable HNP Provide assistance to GOH’s HNP in training, communication systems, forensic equipment, computers, police equipment, boats, and other vehicles. Support rebuilding the Haitian Coast Guard via maintaining and sustaining the capacity of its fleet and personnel to carry out its core missions of maritime interdiction and security operations while disrupting the flow of illegal drugs to the US. No Changes • INL assistance supported the HNP’s recruitment, selection, and training of qualified officers, and growth in the Police Academy’s incoming cadet classes. Since the earthquake, INL has supported the training of 5,713 new police officers, 556 of them female. The School’s 27th promotion graduated in March 2017, bringing the number of HNP officers to over 14,600 officers.
• INL funds supported the development of specialized units including forensics and anti-kidnapping, embedded mentors to strengthen the offices of the Director General and Inspector General, and an expert within the HNP to combat Gender Based Violence.
• INL assistance provided training and subject matter expert advisors to support development of management, administrative, and logistics functions within the HNP.
• INL, partnered with the New York Police Department, developed a community policing program that has grown to more than 100 officers.
• INL completed construction of the presidential security barracks and six police stations. INL awarded a contract for the refurbishment of the HNP Academy to accommodate and sustain larger recruitment classes with additional toilets, classrooms, a kitchen, and a power plant.
• INL assistance supported a high of 100 police officer advisors and ten corrections advisors to MINUSTAH until its departure from Haiti in October 2017. INL now supports five police officer advisors and one correction advisor in the MINUJUSTH mission. U.S. officers provided expertise in the areas of academy training, field training, patrols, community policing, investigations, traffic, crime analysis, forensics, police management, supervisory skills, police administration, and other specialized skills.
INL acted as the Mission’s overall lead for coordinating the training, equipping, and overall development of the Haitian National Police. In terms of infrastructure, INL completed the construction of three HNP Commissariats and initiated new projects, including major improvements to the HNP Cadet School. INL also continued to support the police’s recruitment efforts by providing food supplements and supplies to cadets at the school and financing medical exams for upcoming training classes. These efforts are crucial to maintaining law and order in Haiti, now that the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) has departed and been replaced by the smaller United Nations for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH). These investments will help the HNP reach its goal of 15,000 officers by the end of 2017, as expressed in its five-year development plan. Intensive training increased the HNP’s capacity in community policing and anti-kidnapping. The sustained reduction of kidnappings in Haiti is due in part to INL’s funding of the New York City Police Department’s support to the HNP’s anti-kidnapping unit, as well as cross-trainings on anti-kidnapping by the American Bar Association’s Rule of Law Initiative (ABA/ROLI). The HNP’s Community Policing training program conducted by NYPD mentors brought the unit to over 100 officers. This technique has enabled the HNP to form better relations with local communities. In addition to increasing the capacity of the HNP in other areas, In 2016, INL expanded an SGVB module created in 2014 which continues to serve as a fundamental part of the USG’s training program for HNP and judiciary personnel. INL also continues to prioritize the recruitment of female police cadets in the HNP.
The School’s 27th promotion graduated in March 2017, bringing the number of HNP officers to approximately 14,650. INL assistance supported the HNP’s recruitment, selection, and medical exams of 1,050 cadets who started training in May 2017 and are expected to graduate in December 2017, bringing the total number of HNP officers to over 15,000, a long anticipated goal of the HNP. INL funds continued to support the development of specialized units and provide mentors to strengthen the offices of the Director General and Inspector General. INL assistance continued to provide training and subject matter expert advisors to support development of management, administrative, and logistics functions within the HNP. INL is funding the refurbishment of two police stations in Hinche and Tabarre through the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). INL assistance supports a U.S. contribution to MINUJUSTH of six police and corrections advisors. U.S. officers provided expertise in the areas of crowd control, corrections, gender based violence, counternarcotics, aerial reconnaissance, and SWAT.
Assist the HNP to develop an effective counternarcotics strategy Support the reconstruction and capacity building of the HNP Counternarcotics forces to combat the corrosive effects of narcotics trafficking and corruption of the government and its officials while disrupting the flow of illegal drugs to the US. No Changes • INL assistance grew the K-9 Unit to 19 dogs with drug, explosive, and currency detection capabilities. The BLTS uses the K-9 unit daily at Port-au-Prince and Cap Haitien airport to screen arrivals, and routinely in boat and house searches conducted by the BLTS. Infrastructure has been completed for a K-9 facility at the Haitian Coast Guard/BLTS facility in Les Cayes.
• INL supported five phases of beginning and advanced-level trainings conducted by the Miami-Dade Police Department for BLTS officers.
• Assistance expanded BLTS infrastructure through the procurement of modular units, being installed at strategic points throughout Haiti, including two airports.
• The BLTS has carried out several successful operations yielding drug and cash asset seizures, as well as several significant arrests including high-priority U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) targets, and the unit is expanding its presence in affected areas throughout the country.
• INL supported the restoration of port security and maritime interdiction operations by the Haitian Coast Guard (HCG).
• INL supported the HNP by providing a communication network which will interconnect rule of law activities, including law enforcement operations, investigations, case management, and information sharing.
INL worked with the HNP to enhance its effectiveness in counter-narcotics. BLTS agents attended a range of courses, including the INL-supported Jungla Commando course in Colombia and ILEA courses in San Salvador, which helped prepare them to assume more responsibility as they deploy to satellite offices throughout the country. In 2016, INL supplied two Boston Whalers which are being used to form a joint task force between BLTS and the Coast Guard to support maritime narcotics interdictions and provide humanitarian support. In addition, INL continued to fund the BLTS satellite office in Les Cayes. This office expands BLTS’ reach in its fight against narcotics trafficking in Southern Haiti. In 2017, the BLTS has executed several successful operations that resulted in the seizure of approximately 1.02 metric tons of marijuana and 47.58 kg of cocaine during the first ten months of the year. At total of 110 suspects were arrested for drug related crimes during this period, and one high value target was surrendered to U.S. authorities and prosecuted on drug related charges. DEA and the US Coast Guard (USCG) routinely conduct joing operations with the BLTS and provide assistance in operational planning and intelligence gathering. INL continued to fund a subject matter expert to support the counter narcotics division of the HNP (BLTS) and the Haitian Coast Guard. The BLTS force has grown to 229 officers through INL support at the police school. INL completed the installation of BLTS modular office space around the country, co-locating with the Coast Guard where possible.
Enhance transparency in GOH institutions Support the GOH to reform the l’Unité de Lutte Contre la Corruption (ULCC) to make it an independent unit capable of preventing, detecting, and prosecution corruption cases. Assist the GOH in developing and implementing a comprehensive anti-corruption strategy focusing on financial crime issues including money laundering and procurement fraud, education, prevention, prosecution and enforcement operations. * ULCC and BAFE effectively investigate and prosecute corruption and financial crime;
* Criminal law reforms are implemented. A national strategy to combat corruption is implemented resulting in increased transparency among government organizations. Anti-money laundering training and services are expanded to increase investigations, arrests, and revenue generation through the seizing of funds used in illegal activities. Passage of legal reform results in the establishment of an undercover unit to investigate allegations of corruption within the GOH. Prosecutors are selected and vetted by the Ministry of Justice. Investigations and prosecutions of corruption cases are increased. USG is able to increasingly reduce its investment support.
Since 2012, INL partnered with the Department of the Treasury to strengthen Haiti’s anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing regime. Working with the government of Haiti, INL and Treasury aim to improve the efficiency and effective ness of the financial intelligence unit (French acronym UCREF) to operate in compliance with international standards, institutionalize a financial crimes task force, develop the central bank, and establish controls to protect the financial sector. INL supports upgrades to UCREF’s facilities, hardware, and software for electronic reporting, file databasing, user access, and security access protocols to improve the unit’s functionality and connection with external financial institutions. To improve HNP accountability and reform, INL supports the Inspector General’s (IG’s) office with direct mentorship to enhance HNP capacity to perform internal police investigations, exercise effective command and control over the force, and ensure adherence to policies and procedures. The IG office made progress in combating corruption and police abuse, working with the INL embedded mentor and MINUSTAH (also collocated in the office). The Inspector General’s office meets frequently with various human rights groups in Haiti and initiated weekly press conferences to inform the public of the role of the IG office, resulting in increased visibility and transparency. The IG office dismissed over 800 police officers and recommended termination of more than 100 more in 2014 as a result of investigations for absence from post, other infractions, abuses, and criminal conduct.
In September 2014, OTA concluded its engagement to assist in development of an effective anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing regime compliant with international standards.
* INL’s and Treasury’s work is complemented by USAID technical assistance and capacity-building of the GOH anti-corruption unit and support for civil society efforts to increase transparency.
* The USAID KONEKTE program helped strengthen the investigative capacities of the GOH’s Anti-corruption Unit (ULCC) so it can more effectively investigate corruption cases through information gathered via a GOH database that the Ministry of Finance (MOF) uses to process budget requisitions made by GOH agencies. KONEKTE’s advisors also trained ULCC’s electronic surveillance staff and supported the installation of these databases at the ULCC, enabling ULCC staff to access GOH’s payroll accounts. KONEKTE’s advisors also helped to create a call center for anonymous reporting of corruption cases; training call centers operators and developing questionnaires to collect complaints. The call center received 300 calls, collecting the information and then sharing it with the ULCC to be investigated and turned over to the prosecutor for penal processing. With USAID’s support, ULCC also developed GOH email accounts for ULCC employees, enabling the ULCC to preserve the institutional memory which is crucial to case monitoring. Prior to the creation of this platform, ULCC employees used their own personal email to perform official business and upon their departure all exchanges and important information were systematically lost. KONEKTE also helped to create ULCC’s online public library center, which contains over 300 documents on corruption and offers training modules on the topic.
* To help improve budget transparency and allow citizen to access comprehensive info pertaining to the national budget, a USAID civil society grantee created a website which provides details on the 2016 national budget. As of FY 2016, 3,297 people had visited the website, and have benefited from the additional tools and guidance provided to improve citizen’s knowledge of the budgeting process. The organization also published special sections in Haiti’s main newspaper that discusses specific national budget figures. They also produced four documentary films and published on their website and Facebook page (as of FY 2016, 2,268 visitors visited the page). Leaders also participated in radio and TV shows to help increase understanding of the national budget.
* USAID supported the local chapter of Transparency International, Heritage Foundation of Haiti (LFHH), to raise public awareness and engage in advocacy to reduce corruption. The organization continued to work with local civil society and private sector organizations and hosted two workshops for the Young Haitians Against Corruption network on the progress of anti-corruption efforts within the framework of the International Anti-Corruption Day. The participants produced an Open Letter to Political Candidates and it was published in the newspaper the week before the October 2015 elections. LFHH also conducted a workshop for journalists on the importance of access to information in the fight against corruption, and the advocacy efforts needed to bolster the adoption of the Access to Information bill by the legislature. Thirteen journalists participated in the workshop and signed an Open Letter petitioning parliament to adopt the draft legislation. * INL continues to fund a subject matter expert in the Office of the Inspector General’s office. The Office of the Inspector General (IG) continued to take an activist approach to imposing internal HNP discipline. IN 2017, the HNP took steps toward imposing systematic discipline on officers found to have committed abuses or fraud. The IG continued to hold monthly press conferences and regular meetings with regional and religious authorities to update the public on police internal affairs and remind citizens how to submit complaints. The IG’s office maintained a 24-hour hotline to receive public reports of police corruption or misconduct. As of August 2017, the IG’s office had recommended eleven officers for dismissal in 2017, compared to 27 such recommendations during the same period in 2016.

Attachment E

Section 5(b)(3)(B): An assessment of progress, or lack thereof, over the reporting period toward meeting the goals and objectives, benchmarks, and timeframes specified in the Strategy, including –

For all pillars of the Strategy, refer to; Attachment D: The Strategy Overview Section 5(b)(1),(3)(A) and (3)(B) Excel Chart (updated as of 9/30/2017).

In spite of the challenges of the post-earthquake environment, the Government of Haiti has taken steps to improve the business climate, attract investments, and create jobs. Haitian officials have prioritized investments in basic infrastructure, manufacturing, and agriculture as areas that pay large dividends in fostering economic growth. The Haitian government also reinforced its commitment to improving and strengthening the health system and health services throughout the country. There has been significant progress to improve key health indicators and meet the objectives of Pillar C of the U.S. Haiti Strategy. The U.S. government continues to support access to basic health services for approximately 40 percent of the Haitian population (Health Priority, Strategic Component 1, 2, & 3). In concert with other U.S. government agencies and the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the Department of Health and Human Services has worked to address major causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly for infectious diseases (Health Priority, Strategic Component 2). CDC has also concentrated its efforts to strengthen MSPP systems related to surveillance, laboratory capacity, health system performance, and expansion of the health workforce (Health Priority, Strategic Component 4). Via USAID, capacity building assistance is helping the MSPP to improve data collection and usage, upgrade internal management systems, manage diverse funding sources, and improve its ability to attract, train, and retain professional health workers, and improve internal governance, transparency, and accountability (Health Priority, Strategic Component 4). Significant gains have been made in the area of health infrastructure (nursing school, National Faculty of Health Sciences, and rural clinics) as well (Health Priority, Strategic Component 5). The country is demonstrating positive results and increased human and institutional capacity, in line with the goals and benchmarks of the Strategy.

Section5(b)(3)(B)(i): A description of progress toward designing and implementing a coordinated and sustainable housing reconstruction strategy that addresses land ownership, secure land tenure, water and sanitation, and the unique concerns of vulnerable populations such as women and children, as well as neighborhood and community revitalization, housing finance, and capacity building for the Government of Haiti to implement an effective housing policy.

Since the earthquake, U.S. government-funded shelter solutions, implemented through USAID, have benefited more than 328,000 people, approximately one-fifth of the 1.5 million people estimated to have been displaced by the earthquake. These solutions include permanent housing, transitional shelters, housing repairs, support to host families, rental vouchers, expanding the role of the private sector (financial institutions and land developers), and support to the Government of Haiti authority responsible for housing the vulnerable.

In mid-2017, USAID completed its planned support for its community development and engagement work at one of the USAID-built permanent housing locations near Port-au-Prince. At a second site in the North, the U.S. government is winding down its community development and engagement efforts. USAID’s focus on community development shifted from primarily supporting the Government of Haiti social housing group (EPPLS) to supporting elected community committees working on a variety of topics. Training has been provided to the committee members in such areas as organizational structures, outreach to the community, and how to take appropriate actions. For both sites, collection of lease fees has improved, but EPPLS has to work with the families to attain an acceptable collection level. USAID’s partners conducted job-related skills training to help generate family incomes.

At two additional locations, Terrier Rouge and Ouanaminthe, the United States partnered with another donor on the development of permanent housing settlements. USAID financed the construction of sites and services (water, sanitation, roads and walkways, street lighting, and storm drainage). The partner donor is funding the construction of the permanent houses and community outreach and development. USAID’s work at these two locations is complete and donor-funded houses are nearing completion. The donor, working with the Government of Haiti, is finalizing the beneficiary selection process. Once the selection is completed, families will be moving into their new leased residences.

USAID continues to support the Government of Haiti’s revised housing policy, in particular by helping to address the extensive housing stock shortage in existing formal and informal communities. USAID has been working to identify the needs of these communities, supporting the Government of Haiti entities responsible for housing, and leveraging the significant investments made by existing homeowners to improve and expand their residences and build new houses using safer building techniques. In the one informal community where USAID is working, signs of progress are everywhere with the construction of small community-selected activities (street lighting, drainage systems, community gathering places, street signs, and water and sanitation programs), and plans are finalized for larger works. Most importantly, the community is organizing to decide and plan further growth in a more structured way, leaving room for adequate roads and public spaces for example. With support from USAID, the Government of Haiti’s housing construction unit has taken a broader leadership role in organizing donor activities to avoid duplication. USAID continues to support training programs focusing on improved construction quality by enhancing the skills of construction trade workers. Another key element to building safer houses is oversight of the work; USAID is training homeowners on proper building techniques so they are prepared to oversee the work of their contractors.

USAID efforts to broaden access to formal credit by low and medium income households are very encouraging, with financial institutions demonstrating a willingness to lend to this important population segment. The support for the development of loan tools and training of loan officers on review of loan applications and how to properly service the loan resulted in increased lending. To date, the program has the participation of two large credit institutions.

USAID is also supporting housing development by fostering market efficiencies and financial inclusion in its innovative Homeownership and Mortgage Expansion (HOME) Program. This three-year program, established in July 2015, addresses the affordable housing challenge by: (1) increasing the supply of affordable housing by working with developers and landowners and (2) increasing the demand for affordable housing by working with financial institutions to offer housing loans to middle and lower income Haitian households.

To provide financial institutions with an incentive to make housing loans, the HOME project provides grants upon receipt of evidence of loan disbursement. To date, the project has seen a leverage rate of 15, disbursing $250,000 in grants to Haitian banks and credit unions that have made more than 550 housing loans totaling $3.6 million. In addition, housing portfolios at partner financial institutions have grown by 117 percent and the housing loan share of the general lending portfolio has increased from 19 percent to 35 percent. Meanwhile, technical assistance, including training in credit underwriting, monitoring, and portfolio quality conditions has enabled financial institutions to become more efficient at managing risk, reducing the rate of default from 3.6 percent in 2015 to 1.6 percent today.

Section 5(b)(3)(B)(ii): A description of United States government efforts to construct and sustain the proposed port, as well as an assessment of the current projected timeline and cost for completion.

Deliberate progress is being made on the reconstruction of the Cap-Haitien Port. The parallel tracks of the Government of Haiti pursuing a private operator and USAID contracting for the reconstruction of the port continue to move forward. The Government of Haiti’s efforts continue to be ahead of the USAID procurement process, which is by design so that there will be a private sector operator in place prior to USAID undertaking the major construction work.

Working with the national port authority (APN) has been fruitful; training activities targeted the APN leadership and regulators focusing on their primary roles on port regulations at the Cap Haitien Port. Important agreements and concessions by the Government of Haiti and private port operators will make the Cap Haitien port cost-competitive with others on Hispaniola, and will increase Government of Haiti revenue in the long-term. The broader goal is for these regulatory efforts to be adopted by APN for all port operations in Haiti.

Section 5(b)3(B)(iii): A description of United States government efforts to attract and leverage the investments of private sector partners to the CIP, including by addressing any policy impediments.

As of September 2017, the CIP has six industrial tenants producing apparel, paints, and sisal products, and employs close to 12,900 employees and contractors. In 2016, the U.S. government helped the Société Nationale des Parcs Industriels (SONAPI) engage investors from Sri Lanka, Taiwan, and Bangladesh, and served as the interlocutor for U.S. brands, such as Gap Inc., UnderArmour, and Lululemon Athletica, including during visits to the CIP. The U.S. government also continued to communicate with U.S. retailers and importers to increase awareness of HOPE/HELP trade preferences. Recently, bills were introduced in the Congress to amend the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act to extend the Act to 2030 instead of the current expiration date of 2020. The U.S. government also works with the Government of Haiti and international partners to improve compliance with international and local labor standards and conditions of work. These efforts have contributed $97 million in exports and payrolls close to $12 million for the first 6 months of 2017. The CIP continues to grow at a respectable rate and now accounts for 25 percent of apparel jobs in Haiti.

Section 5(b)(3)(C): A description of the quantitative and qualitative indicators used to evaluate the progress toward meeting the goals and objectives, benchmarks, and timeframes specified in the Strategy at the program level;

Refer to Attachment C: The Description of Indicators (Section 5(b)(3)(C)) Excel Chart (updated as of 9/30/2017)

Section 5(b)(3)(D): The amounts committed, obligated, and expended on programs and activities to implement the Strategy, by sector and by implementing partner at the prime and subprime levels (in amounts of not less than $25,000);

Refer to Attachment B: The Activities List (Sections 5(b)(2) and (3)(D)) Excel Chart (updated as of 9/30/2017)

Section 5(b)(3)(E): A description of the risk mitigation measures put in place to limit the exposure of United States assistance provided under the Strategy to waste, fraud, and abuse;

The risk mitigation measures put in place to limit the exposure of U.S. assistance provided under the Strategy to waste, fraud, and abuse in Haiti include, but are not limited to, the following:

I. USAID

A. The Mission maintains a comprehensive and integrated system of management controls and reviews compliance annually through the Federal Manager’s Financial Integrity Act (FMFIA) process.

B. The Contracting Officer (CO) makes a responsibility determination on prospective implementing partners based on a pre-award capability assessment directed by the Controller. Special award conditions are put in place to mitigate risks identified when appropriate.

C. A post-award conference is held with each implementing partner to clearly explain the administrative and financial accountability requirements that they must comply with.

D. All USAID/Haiti programming conforms to the Agency policy (ADS) 201, which sets precise guidelines for performance monitoring, data quality assessment, and evaluation of activities. These monitoring and evaluation measures enable project-level and Mission managers to quickly identify performance issues that are harbingers of waste, fraud, or abuse. Additionally, USAID performs semiannual Portfolio Reviews that raise to senior Mission management critical issues that may warrant the decision to terminate a project or recommend to the Office of the Inspector General the conduct of an audit.

E. The Mission Controller directs an annual audit and financial review planning process in consultation with project managers and oversees the plan implementation and the tracking of recommendations through closure.

F. The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) plans and conducts performance audits of all major contracts, and others on an as needed-basis, and the resulting recommendations are addressed through corrective actions that are tracked through closure.

G. Mission staff, implementing partner staff, and external auditors receive mandatory training on a continuing basis to maintain their level of competence in internal controls, fraud awareness, ethics, and compliance.

H. An OIG Hotline was established in 2012 where suspected irregularities can be reported anonymously.

I. The OIG established a satellite office at the USAID/Haiti Mission to perform audits and investigations. The Mission Controller maintains a tracking system of open audits and recommendations to ensure recommendations are closed within the prescribed timeframe. The USAID/Haiti Mission also liaises with the Agency Chief Financial Officer in Washington where an inventory of recommendations and status is maintained and reported on a quarterly basis.

J. The GAO is proactive in conducting audits of programs in Haiti with respect to the assistance provided in response to the earthquake and other special interests at the request of Congress; and

K. The USAID/Haiti Mission is implementing improvements to project design to incorporate sustainability analysis for non-infrastructure as well as infrastructure projects at the design phase.

II. Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

The CDC takes seriously its role as a custodian of U.S. taxpayer funds and as such put in place stringent accountability measures for its grantees. Since 2010, CDC has recruited a senior auditor and two mid-level auditors to supplement existing partner management and oversight staff. The audit team supports grantees to review and respond to external audit reports, and to ensure full implementation of corrective action plans, as well as to review budgets and conduct spot-checks of systems. They also provide proactive assistance to organizations to promote compliance with all U.S. government regulations and systems, and to build administrative and financial capacity within local institutions. Finance and management staff also conduct site visits, with an eye towards improving partners’ internal control and tracking systems and institutionalizing appropriate policies and procedures. CDC has continued to provide technical assistance to implementing partners so that they can actively monitor their sub-partners. CDC has also implemented a semi-annual desk review process as part of the comprehensive plan to monitor partner performance when needed. In addition, CDC recruited an individual dedicated to monitoring partners’ renovation projects funded by CDC. This individual conducted contracts reviews to make certain of compliance with U. S. government regulations, conducts both scheduled and unannounced site visits to locations undergoing renovation, and confirms progress reports. The individual does not act on behalf of the partners but rather ensures good stewardship and utilization of U. S. government funds, both for ongoing and past projects. CDC also placed a Public Health Advisor with the MSPP to provide capacity building, review, and improve standard operating procedures and general administrative systems.

III. U.S. Department of State

The Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) retained a Contracting Officer Representative (COR) with construction expertise during this reporting period. Previous INL concerns regarding construction delays related to design and project oversight have been resolved and all major construction projects are projected for completion by December 2017.

In 2014, INL hired a COR dedicated to oversight of U. S. government contracts that support the implementation of key parts of the Haitian National Police Development Plan and the U.S. contribution of police and corrections advisors to the Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH). The COR gives expert advice, guidance, and direction to contractors, which are critical components to contract administration and oversight.

Attachment F

Section 5(b)(4): Provide a description of measures taken to strengthen, and United States government efforts to improve, Haitian governmental and nongovernmental organizational capacity to undertake and sustain United States-supported recovery programs.

Non-Governmental Organizations

Local institutions – private sector partners, civil society organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), cooperatives, associations, and universities – serve as engines of growth and opportunity in Haiti. A key part of USAID’s strategy is to improve the capacity of local Haitian institutions and organizations, while at the same time ensuring rigorous oversight of its assistance funds. Empowering the people of Haiti is critical, and USAID is working to help strengthen local organizations through partnerships, in addition to maintaining its close traditional partnership with the Government of Haiti. By forming local partnerships, USAID makes its work more effective and sustainable, and reduces the need for foreign aid over time.

USAID works with Haitian partner organizations to improve the country’s health, agriculture, education, economic, and human rights sectors. To expand its network of local partners, USAID regularly holds outreach events for Haitian and Haitian diaspora groups outlining how to work with USAID, highlighting opportunities tailored to these organizations. For example, USAID has hosted outreach events targeting more than 230 local organizations in Port-au-Prince, St. Marc and Cap Haïtien regions.

  • Building the capacity of local civil society and non-government organizations: In order to facilitate increased opportunities for direct funding to local partners, USAID launched a Capacity Development Hub, Konbit, which provides management, administrative and financial services to current and potential Haitian partners and implementers and ensures USAID solicitations reach local audiences.
  • Helping farmers grow a stronger agriculture sector: USAID works with local organizations to equip farmers with tools and knowledge needed to thrive. USAID and the Fondation Haïtienne de Développement Agricole Durable (Haitian Sustainable Agricultural Development Foundation) are operationalizing two grain processing centers for maize and sorghum, and improving access to motorized agricultural equipment for small-scale farmers. Working with AGRITECH, USAID is establishing a model low-cost traceability system for mangoes in order to comply with U.S. regulations and help small-scale Haitian mango producers reach American markets. Finally, USAID, the Montrouis Management Association for the Rural Centers of Sustainable Development and the Association of Irrigators of Côte des Arcadins are protecting farming irrigation systems serving nearly 1,200 hectares by improving shoreline protection of ravines.

Improving water, sanitation, and hygiene practices: USAID is addressing the root cause of many public health and environmental issues in Haiti by working with local partners. For example, USAID and Fonkoze are reducing open-air defecation in 10 communities by linking sanitation lessons with a successful pre-existing micro-credit program to help local groups fund sanitation facilities. USAID is also working with Zanmi Lasante in the central plateau and the J/P Haitian Relief Organization in Port-au-Prince’s Delmas 32 neighborhood to improve access to safe drinking water, renovate bathroom facilities, and educate staff, students, parents, and community members.

Training skilled workers and assisting Haitian businesses: USAID is working with local organizations to improve Haiti’s economy. Working with the Youth Development Initiative in Port-au-Prince and Build Change in Cap Haïtien, USAID is strengthening the workforce in the apparel and construction sectors by providing training, apprenticeship, and certification that will enable enrollees to successfully compete in the formal marketplace. Partnering with the Training and Coaching Center, USAID is also helping to formalize and enhance the growth potential of the micro-, small- and medium sized enterprises of the Côte-des-Arcadins and St. Marc areas.

Improving access to quality health services: USAID also supports a network of approximately 20 local NGO partners that manage over 60 health facilities through its Health Services Delivery Project.

Government of Haiti

Some of the most significant steps to increase local capacity are in the health sector. The U.S. government’s overall goal in its health sector strategy is to help build the Government of Haiti’s capacity to provide citizens with quality health care in the future, while ensuring Haitians receive the health care they need now. In the past, the health sector was characterized by limited government capacity to provide services or to regulate the quality of private sector service provision. While the U.S. government is supporting the provision of a basic package of health services, strides are also being made to improve the capacity of the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) to take on a larger role in managing and regulating the country’s health care services. Through USAID, the U.S. government is promoting overall health system strengthening through work with the MSPP, including departmental health authorities and district health units. Haiti’s health ministry is the pilot line ministry for USAID-funded reforms in public financial management and government contracting. Capacity building assistance implemented through USAID is helping the MSPP improve data collection and usage, upgrade internal management systems, manage diverse funding sources, and improve its ability to attract, train, and retain professional health workers, and improve internal governance, transparency, and accountability. USAID has also assisted the MSPP in formalizing and publishing key national health policies and regulations aimed at ensuring quality of nurse training, pharmacy management, community-based care and other areas.

The U.S. Department of the Treasury also provided support in improving financial management of Haiti’s health ministry, which is the pilot ministry for a government-wide initiative to set up a direct deposit system. The Ministry is also performing an employee verification that will help to regularize payments and identify ghost employees and fraud.

As USAID is completing its involvement in new settlements, the work with the Government of Haiti’s social housing unit (EPPLS) is winding down. Assistance with training and capacity building of EPPLS has ended with progress made on their ability to effectively collect rents at the Caracol-EKAM and DLA 1.5 sites. Likewise, USAID is completing its support to strengthen the Unite de Construction de Logements et de Batiments Publics (UCLBP), which was set up within the Prime Minister’s Office in 2013 to oversee national-level policy making for the housing and settlements sector.

With the movement to privatize the operation and maintenance of the Cap Haitien Port, USAID is funding technical assistance to strengthen the broader ports regulatory role of the National Ports Authority (APN). Training has been provided to the higher-level staff and additional sessions for mid-level officers are planned for later 2017.

USAID is supporting the Government of Haiti with needed expertise within government ministries and agencies under the KONEKTE (KONesans E Konpetans TEknik) project KONEKTE is working with the Haitian government by improving accountability, and transparency within the public sector. Implemented at the central government level, KONEKTE placed seventeen technical advisors in various Haitian government entities in 2017. These advisors provided technical expertise to the senior leadership of these agencies in several areas including but not limited to, information technology, contract management, and monitoring and evaluation. The Information Technology Unit of the Ministry of Finances and the Office of Management and Human Resources (OMRH) are among the entities that benefited from that assistance. The technical support resulted in the production of legal, technical, and administrative guidelines and tools to support the Haitian government reforms. Among these guidelines is a contract management guide, an evaluation forms for the procurement of goods and services, and voucher templates. These tools lay out the proper information needed for sound procurement decisions. Moreover, KONKETE’s advisors helped raised awareness on how contracts for public sector contractors should be evaluated. Under the authority of the OMRH, the advisors conducted site visits to 24 Haitian government institutions to explain to mid-level managers the process for evaluating public procurements. KONEKTE’s embedded advisor in OMRH also participated in a working committee that conducted an institutional audit of two Haitian government entities. This committee was created upon the request of the Prime Minister’s Office. This audit should enable the Prime Minister to have all the relevant information regarding the administrative functioning of these two entities and suggest options that may be used for a possible reorganization. In addition, KONEKTE’s advisors supported the OMRH’s Communication Unit to learn how to develop its communications plan and media plan.

USAID’s Food for Peace Title II development program aims to reduce risks and vulnerabilities to food insecurity by increasing food availability, access, and consumption. The program is supporting the Government of Haiti to build and institutionalize their national safety net system. The program works directly with the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor, the Ministry of Health, and other government entities to identify the most vulnerable households and school students for targeted food voucher distribution, nutritional outreach and education, and disaster risk reduction measures.

Working with local governments under the LOKAL+ (Limiye ak Oganizasyon pou Kolektivite yo Ale Lwen) project, USAID is strengthening the capability of municipal governments to better provide services by consulting citizens, planning strategically, budgeting realistically, managing funds transparently, and executing projects efficiently. These activities are demonstrating that the local government can deliver services and results to its citizens in the nine target municipalities of Delmas, Cap Haitien, Ouanaminthe, Saint-Marc, Limonade, Caracol, Carrefour, Kenscoff, and Acul-du-Nord. Each municipality has drafted a local development plan in consultation with local citizens for projects to be financed from local revenues. Local development project committees have been created, which consist of government and civil society representatives: each commune’s director-general, the accountant, the engineer, and a member of the commune’s Citizen Consultative Council (CCC). The communes’ CCCs are umbrella groups of civic leaders including church leaders, business leaders, and leaders of local community-based organizations, the latter including women’s groups and youth associations. LOKAL+ created the CCCs in order to focus citizen efforts to advise the municipalities on establishing development priorities, to advocate on behalf of communities, and to participate annually in the commune’s budget-making and budget execution processes.

The U.S. Department of Labor is supporting capacity building of Haitian institutions via a multi-year program to improve the labor inspection and mediation services of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor. This program is providing technical training and critical resources to a task force of labor inspectors working in the apparel sector, a key industry in the Haitian economy.

Capacity building of local Haitian governmental and nongovernmental institutions is a core priority of the United States’ efforts via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). On the administrative side, CDC staff maintains close relationships with local counterparts, spending approximately 50 percent of their time in the field with partners, conducting site visits, trainings, and financial reviews. They provide daily mentorship and guidance to local organizations to build their capacity in management of human resources, development of budgets, creation of work plans, and implementation of standard operating procedures. To promote sustainability, CDC has linked international and local institutions so they may share best practices and lessons learned. As organizations become more successful, CDC helps them craft success stories to attract other financing and accelerate resource diversification.

On the technical front, CDC medical officers, epidemiologists, veterinarians, nurses, laboratory workers, and other public health staff provide daily mentorship and long-term capacity building of Haitian counterparts. CDC has 21 positions co-located within the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP), including within the main office in Port-au-Prince and within regional hospitals in five departments. These individuals, along with CDC staff stationed within the U.S. Embassy and in CDC-Atlanta, have conducted training for colleagues at local governmental and non-governmental institutions on a wide range of technical issues, including HIV/AIDS care and treatment, tuberculosis, cholera, maternal and child health, malaria, chikungunya, zika, rabies, lymphatic filariasis, and other communicable and non-communicable diseases. The technical expertise which CDC has built in Haiti has enabled the country to take on greater leadership of key programs, including the CDC flagship Field Epidemiology Training Program, which is now coordinated, managed, and supervised by senior staff of MSPP, many of whom are graduates of the program.

Programs run by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) are developed in consultation with and implemented with the support of the Government of Haiti, and police programs are consistent with the Haitian National Police (HNP) five-year development plan. Long-term sustainability remains a major concern, and programs work to help address the Haitian government’s ability to budget for and sustain the police force. To strengthen and improve the capacity of the HNP, the U.S. government, through INL, provides training by bringing subject matter expert advisors to HNP personnel to help strengthen management, administrative, and logistics functions within the police force.

Attachment G

Section 5(b)(5): As appropriate, a description of United States efforts to consult and engage with Government of Haiti ministries and local authorities on the establishment of goals and timeframes, and on the design and implementation of new programs under the Post-Earthquake USG Haiti Strategy: Toward Renewal and Economic Opportunity.

The Government of Haiti has been actively working to assert its leadership in setting priorities for programs implemented by international donors and NGOs. In the past, many of these organizations bypassed the Government of Haiti’s direction or working partnerships, citing weakness and inefficiencies or simply failure to act and spend public funds properly. In November 2012, the Government of Haiti launched a new framework for the coordination of external development aid (the “CAED”) to succeed the 2010 Interim Haiti Recovery Commission (IHRC). Key objectives of the CAED include: increasing the Government of Haiti’s capacity to effectively manage the country’s development process; yielding coherent, harmonized, and coordinated support from all international partners; greater alignment of international funds to national development goals and investment programs; and increasing results-based reporting and transparency. Since its inception, the U.S. government has been one of the strongest champions of the Government of Haiti donor coordination mechanisms and the spirit of collaboration they embody.

The Moise administration recently renewed the Haitian government emphasis on donor coordination and communication. In June 2017, the Haitian government revived the Comité d’Efficacité de l’Aide (CEA), a high-level donor meeting presided over by the Prime Minister and attended by the heads of all major donor organizations including USAID. The next CEA meeting is expected in December 2017. The Haitian government has also revived the system of Tables Sectorielles, which are periodic sector-level meetings between donor organizations and relevant Haitian government institutions. Each Table Sectorielle has an associated Groupe Sectoriel, a group of donor organizations active in the particular sector who meet regularly to ensure that programs are complementary and not duplicative and to share best practices and information. USAID leads the State Reform Groupe Sectoriel and is an active member in the agriculture, water and sanitation, education, energy, environment, health, justice, gender, housing, disaster preparedness, local governance, social protection, and public finance Groupes Sectoriels.

As noted in the response to section 5(b)(3)(B)(ii), to support the Government of Haiti’s development plan for the North, the Government of Haiti requested that the United States, via USAID, support improved port services for the region. In 2013, the U.S. government and the Government of Haiti created a ports task force to jointly review the findings of port feasibility studies in order to determine tasks and timelines. In August 2014, the Government of Haiti officially agreed to pursue private sector upgrading of the Cap Haitien Port to meet the near- to medium-term import and export needs for the region. The agreement letter, signed by the Government of Haiti and USAID, details the responsibilities of each party, and describes a projected timeline to complete the work. With the decision by the Government of Haiti to focus on rehabilitating and upgrading the existing Cap Haitien port, USAID and the Government of Haiti jointly developed a master plan that outlines the parameters for an improved port. USAID and the Haitian government are implementing parallel procurement actions. USAID is funding the landside and marine construction activities that will result in a modern container port operation. USAID also financed assistance for the Government of Haiti to procure the services of a private sector entity to operate and maintain the improved port for a period of 25 years. Both sets of procurement actions are ongoing.

USAID engages at multiple levels with Haiti’s health ministry. The new Minister, Dr. Marie Greta Roy Clément, recently re-launched the Table Sectorielle, the quarterly donor coordination platform led by the Minister of Health. USAID is actively engaged in both the Table Sectorielle and in the monthly health donor coordination group led by the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO). In addition, as the pilot line ministry for reforms in public financial management and government contracting, USAID capacity building assistance is helping the Ministry of Health to improve data collection and usage, upgrade internal management systems, manage diverse funding sources, and improve its ability to attract, train and retain professional health workers, and improve internal governance, transparency and accountability. USAID is working with the Ministry of Health and the World Bank to strengthen oversight and improve service provision through results­based financing. As implementation is now underway, results‑based financing is beginning to incentivize performance at the health facility level by linking bonus payments directly to priority health outcomes (e.g. a facility receives a bonus payment if they surpass a targeted number of new consultations, institutional births, etc.). Results-based financing is being implemented at both Ministry-supported and non-governmental organization health facilities with the objectives of increased management capacity and oversight by the Ministry of Health and improved health outcomes.

USAID also collaborates with the Ministry of Justice, the justice committees in the senate and the chamber, and the High Judicial Council (CSPJ) – the management and oversight body of the judiciary. In 2017, USAID provided significant technical and logistical support to the CSPJ. This support enabled the CSPJ’s Judicial Inspection Unit to conduct 13 judicial inspections and investigations. USAID also assisted the CSPJ in the development of a career and promotion plan for judges and to prepare the CSPJ’s 2016-2017 annual report. With USAID’s support, the CSPJ vetting unit developed a new, less costly and more effective methodology for vetting judges. USAID also provided training to CSPJ staff on protocol, which led to the CSPJ establishing a Protocol Unit. At the local level and specifically in USAID’s five target jurisdictions, USAID provided technical and logistical support to local courts and prosecutors’ offices. This assistance enabled the head of jurisdictions to lead forums to strengthen coordination among stakeholders (e.g. police, justice, prisons, and civil society organizations) in each jurisdiction. With significant USAID support, the draft legislation on legal assistance was finalized and adopted by the senate. The chamber of deputies is expected to vote positively on the legislation in the coming months. If passed, this legislation would represent the first of its kind in Haiti, institutionalizing legal assistance as a responsibility of the State, both for indigent persons in conflict with the law and victims of crime, and providing consultations and mediation services free of charge. USAID is helping the Ministry of Justice to plan for implementation of the law. While the law is making its way through Parliament, USAID established legal assistance programs in four of its target jurisdictions. Two hundred and one individuals have already benefited from this assistance. These law clinics will progressively phase out, as the national program is rolled out.

Working with local governments under the LOKAL+ (Limiye ak Oganizasyon pou Kolektivite yo Ale Lwen) project, USAID is strengthening the capability of municipal governments to better provide services by consulting citizens, planning strategically, budgeting realistically, managing funds transparently, and executing projects efficiently. These activities are demonstrating that the local government can deliver services and results to its citizens in the nine target municipalities of Delmas, Cap Haitien, Ouanaminthe, Saint-Marc, Limonade, Caracol, Carrefour, Kenscoff, and Acul-du-Nord. Each municipality has drafted a local development plan in consultation with local citizens for projects to be financed from local revenues. Local development project committees have been created which consist of government and civil society representatives: each commune’s director-general, the accountant, the engineer, and a member of the commune’s Citizen Consultative Council (CCC). The communes’ CCCs are umbrella groups of civic leaders including church leaders, business leaders, and leaders of local community-based organizations, the latter including women’s groups and youth associations. LOKAL+ created the CCCs in order to focus citizen efforts to advise the municipalities on establishing development priorities, to advocate on behalf of communities, and to participate annually in the commune’s budget-making and budget execution processes.

In our shelter program, USAID has adopted a new approach to achieve greater cost efficiency and sustainability. The redirected program supports the Government of Haiti’s revised housing policy that promotes work in existing formal and informal neighborhoods. This new approach capitalizes and leverages the demonstrated ability of low-income Haitian households to build with their own resources. USAID emphasizes work that reinforces community governance structures, including formally registered housing cooperative organizations that oversee management of new neighborhoods. Another element of the new housing focus is to promote greater involvement of the private sector in addressing the housing stock shortfall. Two aspects of private sector involvement include: supporting financing institutions with funding mortgage‑type instruments for low and medium income households, and assisting housing developers to build safer houses for low to medium income households.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) continuously consults with counterparts within the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) and other Government of Haiti institutions regarding the strategic and technical direction of existing and new programs. CDC leadership meets frequently with the Minister of Health, Director General, and other key program managers to discuss priorities and timelines, particularly during U.S. government and the Government of Haiti planning seasons. CDC technical and administrative staff works with departmental and community colleagues on a daily basis to refine work plans, budgets, and implementation strategies to help overcome bottlenecks and adapt to new needs. CDC also continues to strengthen the MSPP funding management unit so the Government of Haiti can also seek and apply for other funding opportunities.

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) Section in Port-au-Prince meets regularly with Haitian government counterparts to discuss programs and related progress. INL evaluates each implementing agreement via regular meetings, phone calls, reviews of implementers’ progress reports, and the completion of quarterly reviews of programs against established goals and objectives. INL uses information from its regular oversight and monitoring activities, as well as its Haiti Country Plan, consistent with the Post Earthquake U.S. government Strategy for Haiti, to inform programmatic and budgetary choices.

As the current strategy period comes to an end and in order to inform the next USAID strategic framework, the USAID/Haiti Mission held individual strategic consultations with 16 Haitian government ministries and/or bureaus and ten donor agencies and five UN agencies; two consultative strategic fora with more than 700 civil society, local government, religious leaders and/or implementing partners; and a diaspora roundtable with an estimated 30 representatives from key diaspora organizations. These consultations are in addition to the myriad civil society and Haitian government representatives consulted for the purposes of the democracy, human rights, and governance assessment; the gender assessment; the youth assessment; the biodiversity and tropical forestry assessment; the political economy analysis; and the private sector landscape assessment. USAID/Haiti technical offices have also consulted widely with their respective line ministries, bilateral and multilateral partners in the development of Project Appraisal Documents (PAD) and activity designs this year. For example, the Health Office consulted widely with MSPP leadership and partners from the health donor group in the development of the Health Systems Strengthening PAD now in final clearance stages to ensure the complementarity of USAID investments. Those consultations signaled that agriculture, education, and economic development were key priorities of all consulted, which aligns with the new strategic framework.

Attachment H

Section 5(b)(6): A description of efforts by Haiti’s legislative and executive branches to consult and engage with Haitian civil society and grassroots organizations on the establishment of goals and timeframes, and on the design and implementation of new donor-financed programs, as well as efforts to coordinate with and engage the Haitian diaspora;

One of the core principles of the U.S. government strategy for Haiti is that U.S. government assistance will be country-led and build country capacity. To that end, we work to encourage Haiti’s government leaders to consult actively with civil society and grassroots organizations so our Government of Haiti counterparts can provide informed guidance to us and other donors as we design and implement our programs; election delays and unpredictable changes in Haitian government leadership have sometimes made these efforts particularly challenging.

USAID actively promotes the ability of civil society organizations (CSOs) and grassroots organizations to engage with Haitian government officials at both the national and local levels. For instance:

  • Under the Consortium for Elections and Political Process Strengthening project, USAID supported civil society activities related to the 2015-2016 parliamentary and presidential electoral cycle. These included a series of presidential candidate debates, which established a precedent for presidential candidates to campaign on issues affecting the Haitian populace and nine dialogues through which women’s organizations and other civil society groups and local authorities discussed ways to increase women’s political participation in Haiti.
  • USAID supported the creation of a nationwide nonpartisan Haitian election observation coalition called the Citizen Observatory for the Institutionalization of Democracy (OCID) to monitor the pre-election environment and introduce globally-proven election observation methodologies to Haiti to strengthen local elections monitoring. OCID is comprised of three organizations: Initiative de la Societe Civile (ISC), Centre Oecumenique des Droits Humains (CEDH) and JURIMEDIA. OCID’s main areas of monitoring are human rights promotion, citizen participation, political party representation, the electoral process, and public policies. OCID was the only domestic observation group utilizing statistically-based observation methodology during their monitoring efforts. As a result, they were able to project election results within a small margin of error at approximately the same time as the official election results were released, ensuring they could hold the election commission accountable for releasing accurate electoral results.
  • Working with local governments under the LOKAL+ (Limiye ak Oganizasyon pou Kolektivite yo Ale Lwen) project, USAID is helping municipal governments to better provide services by consulting citizens, planning strategically, budgeting realistically, managing funds transparently, and executing projects efficiently. These activities are demonstrating that the local government can deliver services and results to its citizens in the nine target municipalities of Delmas, Cap-Haitien, Ouanaminthe, Saint-Marc, Limonade, Caracol, Carrefour, Kenscoff, and Acul-du-Nord. Each municipality has drafted a local development plan in consultation with local citizens for projects to be financed from local revenues. To focus citizen efforts to advise the municipalities on development priorities, advocate on behalf of communities, serve on local project committees, and participate in the commune’s annual budget-making and budget execution processes, LOKAL+ created Citizen Consultative Councils (CCCs), umbrella groups of civic leaders including church and business leaders, and leaders of local community-based organizations including women’s groups and youth associations.

USAID is also prioritizing the strengthening of civil society participation as a critical tool in implementing more efficient and effective programming. The USAID/Haiti Konbit Program supports civil society strengthening and the participation of CSOs in program implementation. Konbit is designed to increase the number of local development partners who are influencing and achieving significant and sustainable development results in Haiti, are accountable to their constituents, and are able to effectively compete for and manage resources. The project facilitates synergies among CSOs and the organizational capacity development of CSOs. USAID/Haiti has established a state of the art interactive website called the “Capacity Development Hub” that will be used to: (1) set up and coordinate the provision of local capacity development services; (2) create a Development Innovation Network; and, (3) develop and implement monitoring, evaluation, and learning activities that accurately gauge project progress and promote improved program results. There is also a small grants program that offers technical assistance to local partners to promote innovations in development activities.

Through the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), the U. S. government maintains strong collaboration with the Government of Haiti to identify projects and seek to promote sustainability on security issues. INL liaises with other international partners of the Haitian National Police (HNP) via the Supreme Council of the National Police and through the HNP-created donor committee that monitors implementation of the 2017-2021 development plan. Via INL, the U.S. government also engages civil society groups on issues such as anti-corruption, judicial reform, and HNP protection of vulnerable populations. This outreach has helped inform INL-supported training programs and affected solicitation design. New York Police Department officers funded through INL mentored the HNP Community Policing Unit to launch a youth outreach program in February 2015 aimed at civic education, fitness, and recruiting young people interested in law enforcement careers. This Haitian-led outreach by the community police was coupled with continued programming to engage community leaders and grassroots organizers through town hall meetings and public events, drawing citizens from some of Port-au-Prince’s most troubled neighborhoods into more regular dialogue with the police. INL continues to support this Community Policing Unit through an embedded subject matter expert.

The Office of the Citizen Protector, the country’s independent human rights ombudsperson, continued its investigations into allegations of human rights abuses, worked collaboratively with international organizations, and implemented its assistance programs throughout the country.

Diaspora Engagement

USAID has been working to achieve economic growth and development through the engagement of the Haitian diaspora, a powerful ally of both the U.S. and Haiti in reaching the shared goal of a continually growing Haiti. Since 2011, through the Leveraging Effective Applications of Direct investments (LEAD) activity, USAID has been implementing a series of activities that directly targeted the diaspora. In conjunction with the Ministry of Haitians Living Abroad, and Haitian Diaspora institutions, LEAD implemented a series of roads shows in key cities in the United States such as Miami, Boston, Atlanta, New York, and Chicago, to inform the Haitian diaspora community on economic opportunities in Haiti. As a result of their engagement in the LEAD project, 15 of the 46 businesses competitively selected to receive matching funds were diaspora owned, and 12 social development projects were jointly funded by LEAD and diaspora groups in Haiti. Community-development projects include investments in agriculture, education, health, and water and sanitation. LEAD also sponsored a Diaspora Challenge Initiative that collected innovative ideas with high potential to make a significant difference in the business ecosystem in Haiti.

Attachment I

Section 5(b)(7): Consistent with the Government of Haiti’s ratification of the United Nations Convention Against Corruption, a description of efforts of the Governments of the United States and Haiti to strengthen Government of Haiti institutions established to address corruption, as well as related efforts to promote public accountability, meet public outreach and disclosure obligations, and support civil society participation in anti-corruption efforts:

Haiti is a signatory to the UN Convention against Corruption and the Inter-American Convention against Corruption, and in May 2014, Haiti passed the much-anticipated Law on the Prevention and Repression of Corruption. The law gives new legal authority to the government’s Anticorruption Unit (ULCC) and its Financial Intelligence Unit, among others, to combat corruption. Haiti demonstrated some level of commitment in FY 2017 to tackle corruption within the public sector. During the year, the ULCC launched a national outreach campaign to sensitize the general population to offenses addressed by the new law. The ULCC also opened a national hotline that remained active, although underutilized, to field complaints that in some instances led to investigations. Law enforcement authorities and the government’s anticorruption agencies launched several investigations that led to the dismissal and arrest of some government officials. Although the government continued to implement legal, administrative, and management reforms designed to increase accountability in several ministries and government institutions, the perception of corruption remained widespread in all branches and at all levels.

The U.S. government, primarily through USAID, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), and the Department of the Treasury, works to improve transparency and accountability and combat corruption on a number of fronts.

USAID

To strengthen the Haitian government’s public financial management systems, USAID has been providing technical assistance to the Ministry of Economy and Finance, the Tax Authority, the Office of Management and Human Resources, and the Programming and Analysis Units of the Ministry of Planning. USAID worked with the Ministry of Economy and Finance to implement the Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS), which resulted in a single network linking the 51 budget institutions in the Port-au-Prince area and the provision of hardware, software, and training to 13 of the Haitian government’s largest budget institutions to facilitate the efficient and secure exchange of data. In 2014-2015, USAID facilitated linking the Office of Management and Human Resources’ management system to the payroll system of the Ministry of Economy and Finance in an effort to eliminate ghost workers. In 2017, the USAID-funded IFMS project completed the renovation of the Ministry of Economy and Finance Network Operation Center and equipped it with state of the art servers; repaired 20 IFMS network sites and started installing new communication equipment; developed two Unified Exchange Platform web services for five institutions so they could exchange information more efficiently and securely; connected 10 municipalities’ tax collection operations with the central Tax Authority (DGI) office; connected two regional Supreme Audit Institutions offices with the DGI central office to facilitate the audit of municipal finances; provided information technology equipment to 13 regional DGI sites to connect them to the central office; and developed new functionalities for the Human Resources Management System, including on-boarding of new civil servants, monthly affirmation, career management, and a payroll interface with the Treasury.

USAID funded several activities of Haitian civil society organizations (CSOs) to improve transparency and address corruption, including support for the local organization Group Croissance on “Civil Society in Haiti’s Budgetary Process.” This activity worked to: (1) strengthen Haitian civil society’s role in understanding and analyzing the Haitian national budget; (2) support the Government of Haiti’s executive branch and the Parliament in the drafting and adoption of the Haitian national budget; and (3) inform Haitian citizens about the Government of Haiti’s finances and funding priorities. Activities included a national survey on development priorities, a series of four documentary films, print and electronic media outreach on the budget process, training for CSO and ministry representatives, and publication and dissemination of analyses on the Haitian national budget.

INL

To improve the accountability of the Haitian National Police (HNP) and facilitate reform, INL supports the Inspector General’s office with direct mentorship to enhance HNP capacity to perform internal police investigations, exercise effective command and control over the force, and ensure adherence to policies and procedures. Through direct mentoring and in coordination with UN Police officers, the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) on October 15, 2017 transitioned to a police-only successor mission the UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH) on October 16, 2017. The Office of the Inspector General made notable progress in combatting corruption and police abuses through recruiting new investigators, developing investigation standards, reviewing case files by committee, and completing investigations leading to the dismissal of more than 800 police since 2014 for issues ranging from absence from post to criminal conduct. The current Chief Inspector General (IG) continued to take an activist approach to imposing internal HNP discipline, including overseeing continued investigations and vetting of police officers, with ongoing attention to high-ranking officers. New York Police Department officers delivered training to investigators and mid-level HNP officers on corruption and monitoring for integrity until this program ended in March 2017. The IG’s office worked to maintain transparency and visibility by conducting regular site visits of police stations to monitor performance and by holding regular press conferences with the public. The press conferences continue to describe the role of the HNP and its specialized units’ responsibilities to the general public. The IG office monitors complaint lines for citizens to report any types of police misbehavior and conducts outreach with local and international human rights groups.

The U.S. government supported the creation of a comprehensive, independent Judicial Inspection Unit (JIU) within the Superior Council of Judicial Power through an INL grant with the American Bar Association (ABA). This grant, which ended in March 2017, included support for the development of a strategic plan, procedures, and methodologies for inspection, assistance in enforcing judicial fee scale, and establishing a pilot office for the JIU. Eleven experienced judges were appointed JIU inspectors by the end of the program. The ABA trained a total of 3,442 justice sector actors on basic and specialized skills since the program’s inception.

Department of the Treasury

The U.S. Department of the Treasury has worked closely with the Government of Haiti to increase the effectiveness and transparency of financial management systems. A Treasury Single Account banking structure was implemented by the Bank of the Republic of Haiti (BRH), and 624 government bank accounts have closed since October 2013. A BRH bank account portal has been created, which gives the Ministry of Finance/Treasury the ability to see daily balances of all accounts listed in the portal for the BRH. A direct deposit system is being set up for the entire government, with the Ministry of Health serving as the first ministry to implement the project. With the assistance of the Revenue branch of Treasury’s Office of Technical Assistance, major aspects of the Large Taxpayer Office (LTO) have been reviewed and re-engineered. The LTO has implemented an audit plan process, risk assessment, auditor time sheets and activity logs, as well as a quality review of cases. From December 2013 through September 2017, Haiti’s Tax Authority expanded from seven to 18 computerized office sites, with plans for at least seven more offices to be established in 2018. In September 2017, the Tax Authority began rollout of its new revenue management system and expects complete deployment of the system in 2018, including the introduction of e-filing for large taxpayers. Implementing automated processes will increase transparency and reduce opportunities for corruption.

Attachment J

Section 5(b)(8): A description of efforts to leverage public-private partnerships and increase the involvement of the private sector in Haiti in recovery and development activities and coordinate programs with the private sector and other donors;

Haiti’s private sector is an essential contributor to the country’s long-term economic development and vitality. The Haitian economy continues to be primarily driven by micro‑, small-, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs), which have the potential to be strong engines of economic growth and create thousands of new jobs. However, MSMEs often are not well managed and have difficulties raising capital, and so are limited in their ability to grow. To address this challenge, the U.S. government, working through USAID, has used several mechanisms to meet the business development and financial needs of targeted MSMEs. For example, under the Local Enterprise and Value Chain Enhancement project, the U.S. government provides technical assistance and business development services to MSMEs to strengthen their management and improve product quality. The Leveraging Effective Application of Direct Investments project aims to attract investments in Haitian MSMEs by using a matching grant competition mechanism to leverage private investments and to strengthen their balance sheets to make them more credit worthy. USAID’ s Development Credit Authority (DCA) makes it easier for enterprises to access bank credit by guaranteeing 50 percent of commercial bank loans to qualified firms. The combined impact of these kinds of measures has helped strengthen and build the capacity of more than 1,000 Haitian MSMEs and thus contributed significantly to the development and growth of the Haitian economy. Additionally, under some DCA and other programs specifically designed for housing and agriculture, the U.S. government reached more than 38,000 beneficiaries.

Via USAID, the U.S. government is also involved in specific public-private partnerships with medium and large firms in projects that are scalable over time and create opportunities for sustainable income growth for Haitian workers. Large firms, private foundations and multilateral institutions such as the Coca-Cola Company, the Soros Economic Development Fund, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Heineken, Yunus Social Business Haiti, General Electric, W. K. Kellogg Foundation, General Electric Foundation, Porticus America, and the Inter-American Development Bank have entered into a series of partnerships with USAID.

For infrastructure activities, the bulk of the larger construction work is performed by Haitian private sector subcontractors. Working through USAID, the U.S. government has supported vocational training to prepare Haitians for jobs in other sectors, including para-seismic masonry, agriculture, marine ecosystem monitoring, geographic information systems, and hospitality management.

Attachment K

Section 5(b)(9): A description of efforts to address the particular needs of vulnerable populations, including internally displaced persons, women, children, orphans, and persons with disabilities, in the design and implementation of new programs and infrastructure;

USAID/Haiti works with local partner organizations advocating for women’s rights including the prevention of gender-based violence (GBV), which remains a widespread problem in Haiti. The risk of violence against and sexual exploitation of women and girls is exacerbated by poverty, poor security, and a lack of awareness. Sustained engagement is required to reduce vulnerability through legislative action, community outreach, increased literacy, and economic empowerment.

USAID’s “Konbat Vyolans” project is working to improve advocacy and awareness around GBV, and to increase survivors’ access to integrated direct services, including crisis support, emergency shelter and transitional housing, medical care and referral services, counselling, psychosocial care and support, legal advocacy, and economic opportunities. The project supports organizations that assist the most vulnerable populations especially children, youth, and women who are survivors or at risk of GBV by providing them with or referring them to appropriate services to prevent and/or respond to exploitation, violence and abuse. Konbat Vyolans coordinates activities closely with the Ministry of Female Status and the Rights of Women (MCFDF) to strengthen the justice system, Parliament and other institutions (such as the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor – MAST and Haitian Social Services – IBESR, to advance GBV policy, legislation, capacity building, and prevention goals. Finally, the project will develop a communication platform for providers of health, legal, economic, and psycho‑social services to GBV survivors to share context-specific best practices and lessons learned.

A central tenet of the U.S. government health strategy in Haiti is addressing the needs of orphans and vulnerable children. Through the Bien-être ak santé timoun (BEST) project, USAID supports children affected and infected by HIV/AIDS in Haiti to grow into healthy, educated young adults free from violence and the ill-effects of HIV. The Project operates in communities across Haiti to ensure that healthcare needs are met for HIV positive pregnant women and mothers, HIV positive children and young people 0-18 years of age, and HIV positive orphans and vulnerable children including HIV negative children living in areas of high HIV prevalence. USAID supports programming in 145 hospitals/clinics in all of the country’s 10 departments.

Under its health infrastructure program, USAID retrofitted a number of clinics and schools with access ramps and railings, where possible, widening the doorway openings to provide improved access for the disabled. In addition, the houses for the new settlement programs are designed with door openings and bathrooms that can accommodate people with disabilities.

Following the emergency phase immediately after the 2010 earthquake, USAID worked to address the housing needs of internally displaced persons. Via USAID, the U.S. government reached more than 65,600 households by providing shelter solutions, including transitional shelters (t-shelters), repairs to damaged houses, support to host families who housed displaced people, and rental vouchers. USAID partners constructed more than 29,100 t-shelters, repaired more than 5,800 structures to shelter more than 8,100 households, and provided housing support to more than 27,200 households and rental vouchers to roughly 1,200 households, thereby housing more than 328,000 individuals.

USAID is promoting inclusive education for students with visual impairments. Collaborating with the Societe Haitienne d’Aide aux Aveugles (Haitian Society for Aid to the Blind), a local NGO, USAID is increasing access to quality education for children who are blind or visually impaired in Port-au-Prince and Cap Haitien. This project will mainstream 250 students with visual impairments into classrooms, provide needed resources for the visually impaired, and print books in braille and audio to be reproduced for more schools around the country. USAID is also improving access for students with disabilities in the education sector. USAID retrofitted 19 primary schools to accommodate students with physical disabilities and provided disability awareness training to more than 660 teachers and school principals. More than 62,000 community members, 400 parents, and 800 school staff also participated in disability awareness programs.

Via the Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), through March 31, 2017, U.S. government assistance supported an embedded mentor in the Haitian National Police’s (HNP) Women’s Affairs department on combatting GBV. This advisor, alongside HNP Women’s Affairs officers, delivered training on countering violence against women at police stations around Haiti, reaching approximately 500 officers. In April 2017, this position was expanded to include community policing. The advisor was instrumental in assisting the HNP to recruit and retain female police cadets through the screening and class selection process for the 27th Promotion, resulting in the graduation of 80 women (8.5 percent of the class) in 2017. In FY 2014, INL funded the participation of two HNP curriculum developers in the International Police and Education and Training Program on improving police response to crimes against marginalized groups. Working with the International Association of Chiefs of Police, mentors from the Washington, DC, Metro Police and Miami Beach Police Department, the HNP developed a training curriculum to raise awareness among cadets about the LGBTQ community and protection of human rights. The HNP now includes this curriculum in basic cadet training. Through FY 2017, 2,418 cadets received this training.

Attachment L

Section 5(b)(10): A description of the impact that agriculture and infrastructure programs are having on the food security, livelihoods, and land tenure security of smallholder farmers, particularly women;

The combined effect of increased yields, better natural resource management, and the strengthening of markets has had a positive impact on food security by significantly increasing incomes, improving livelihoods, and expanding access to nutritious food for beneficiary farmers. The introduction of new technology, coupled with appropriate inputs and the rehabilitation of irrigation systems, in some cases allowed farmers to double or triple yields of focus crops.

Beneficiary farmers have seen substantial increases in yields of plantains, rice, and cacao with assistance from USAID. Rice farmers in the northern regions of Haiti tripled their yields over the past three years. Similarly, the value of the cacao exports has quadrupled since 2013. Banana farmers in the West Department of Haiti reported yield increases of more than 100 percent when utilizing new technologies introduced by USAID.

USAID built the capacity of local institutions to support agricultural systems in Haiti. As part of an interagency agreement and with the support of the USDA, USAID conducted a pilot soil mapping exercise that helps farmers identify productive soils. This effort was complemented by the establishment of new soil and plant pathology laboratories at one of the Centers for Sustainable Rural Development that USAID supports. USAID also partnered with U.S. universities and international research organizations to improve seed production and introduce new high yielding bean and corn varieties to Haiti. To help create a new cadre of agricultural researchers and technicians, USAID sponsored more than 20 Haitian students to earn master’s degrees in the United States.

On the hillsides above the productive plains, USAID has worked to reverse decades of damage caused by unsustainable practices. In cooperation with our partners, USAID constructed gabion walls in ravines and planted more than five million fruit and forest trees, as well as ground cover on vulnerable hillsides with the result of increased water infiltration and reduced soil erosion. USAID also supported the establishment of environmentally friendly, income producing agroforestry systems, including cacao plantations, to these hillsides. Additionally, USAID introduced greenhouses and water retention ponds to allow farmers to produce high value crops and shift agricultural production from hillsides, thus reducing the impact of farming in these sensitive areas.

USAID has improved agricultural market linkages in Haiti. Notably, USAID has supported the mango export value chain through a public private partnership with Coca-Cola and by funding efforts to expand phytosanitary and traceability systems. Small farmers have benefited from USAID-funded activities that link them with micro finance, thus providing them with much needed access to capital. Additionally, USAID has worked with farmer organizations to promote direct marketing of high value specialty crops to high end grocery stores, restaurants, and hotels.

Under USAID’s Feed the Future (FTF) projects, USAID investments in agriculture have benefited more than 84,000 rural households, of which 78,000 reported significant increases in income. As of June 2017, nearly 52,000 farmers had applied new agricultural technologies introduced by FTF on more than 34,000 hectares.

FTF activities worked to empower Haitian women to increase their incomes and improve their access to agricultural technologies and inputs. Since FY 2014, a total of 33,502 women have received training in improved agricultural methods and nutritional practices, gained greater access to market information and agricultural inputs, or increased their capacity to manage small agriculture related businesses. Additionally, the FTF AREA (Appui à la Recherché et au Développement Agricole) activity developed an assessment instrument to better measure gender integration in Haiti’s agricultural sector. The information generated by this tool will inform a report on integrating women into Haiti’s agricultural extension service.

Attachment M

Section 5(b)(11): A description of mechanisms for communicating the progress of recovery and development efforts to the people of Haiti, including a description of efforts to provide documentation, reporting and procurement information in Haitian Creole;

The USAID Mission designed a multi-media strategy to communicate USAID’s programmatic efforts that address the Haitian people’s priorities and demonstrate the U.S. government’s long‑term commitment to supporting the Government of Haiti in its effort to create sustainable development. This strategy is comprised of diverse outreach mechanisms that focus on the successful collection and dissemination of information that tracks USAID progress in Haiti; outreach to local media; and direct communication with local implementing partners, civil society, and the Haitian public.

The Mission hosts frequent public events that are conducted in French and Creole and receive ample coverage in the local media. Public outreach events include officials from the Government of Haiti, local implementing partners, and civil society. The Mission also speaks directly to the Haitian public through participation in radio talk show programs, which are the primary news source for nearly 90 percent of Haitians. One example is regular radio broadcasts with USAID Health Team technical officers discussing in a “call-in” format various health information and initiatives. These broadcasts are delivered in French and Creole.

USAID social media outreach in English, French, and Creole is done in coordination with the embassy’s public diplomacy social media outreach platform to include Twitter and Facebook. This social media outreach also reaches the Haitian diaspora, who actively influence and play an important role in supporting the country’s development efforts.

USAID Haiti regularly does public outreach and media events across all USAID sectors of programming and regularly featuring the Mission Director, the U.S. Ambassador or Chargé d’Affaires, and Haitian government ministers and officials. For example, USAID hosted an event in June 2017 for local press highlighting how Haitian farmers will benefit from using an improved corn seed variety being distributed under the Feed the Future project.

At these events, press materials in both French and Creole were distributed to Haitian journalists. The Mission also systematically translates into French and Creole all public information relevant to local stakeholders. This includes fact sheets that document program objectives, goals, and results.

Attachment N

Section 5(b)(12): A description of the steps the Government of Haiti is taking to strengthen its capacity to receive individuals who are removed, excluded, or deported from the United States.

In response to conditions in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake, DHS Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) temporarily suspended removals to Haiti. After approximately one year, ICE coordinated with the Government of Haiti and resumed removals of Haitian nationals who had final orders of removal and had been convicted of a serious crime.

Through USAID, the U.S. government supported a socio-economic reintegration program for criminal returnees from April 2011 to April 2014. Program participation was voluntary, and those returnees who chose to participate were provided with transportation to their home community or temporary accommodation, basic medical care and psycho-social counseling, basic language and skills training, employment referrals, and other support to facilitate reintegration. From 2010 to 2013, the Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) implemented a reception program for economic migrants interdicted at sea and repatriated to Haiti by the U.S. Coast Guard.

With both programs having ended, the Government of Haiti’s Office of National Migration (ONM) assumed full responsibility for providing support to returning criminal returnees and economic migrants. A lack of resources continues to hamper the ONM’s capacity to meet the basic needs of these returnees, including their inability to support the rent for an accommodation center in Port-au-Prince, and sporadic provision of food supplies, hygiene kits, and transportation for economic migrants returning to Cap Haitien and Port-au-Prince.

Despite having to contend with budget shortfalls, the Government of Haiti has demonstrated the will and determination to manage the return of its citizens. Since the resumption in October 2014 of expedited removals of Haitian migrants interdicted on U.S. islands in the Mona Passage and mainland Puerto Rico and the rescission of the Policy for Resumed Removals to Haiti, which now allows ICE to remove all removable aliens to Haiti, the Haitian government continues to competently manage expedited return flights of migrants. Our embassy in Port-au-Prince works closely with Haiti’s Ministry of the Interior and ONM to welcome and process returnees safely and professionally.

In response to a FY 2016 spike in Haitian overland migration to the southern U.S. border, the United States announced in September 2016 the resumption of non-criminal Haitian deportation flights. Via USAID, the U.S. government supported a socio-economic reintegration program for non-criminal returnees from November 2016 to May 31, 2017. During the seven-month project, USAID’s work through the International Organization for Migration (IOM) reinforced the operational capacity of the ONM by installing a welcome center at the airport and training the ONM staff on psychosocial support. Through the direct assistance provided at the airport, IOM rented buses to transport beneficiaries, and provided beneficiaries with water, a hot meal, a hygiene kit, and approximately $75 for onward transportation to their final destination. Upon arrival, beneficiaries requiring medical assistance received psychosocial and health support from the IOM health team.

In June 2017, ONM began managing the entire reception and reintegration process independently. As of this date, the Haitian government has accepted all of the non-criminal cases that ICE presented for removal. Since resuming the non-criminal flights in October 2016, ICE has successfully repatriated more than 5,000 non-criminal Haitian nationals. The U.S. embassy continues to work with DHS-ICE to build and supplement the capacity of ONM to accept additional migrants, in light of their resource constraints.

Attachment O

Section 5(b)(13): An assessment of actions necessary to be taken by the Government of Haiti to assist in fulfilling the objectives of the Strategy:

A. Ports and energy are two critical sectors in which actions by the Government of Haiti are necessary to assist in fulfilling the objectives of the Strategy. The USAID assessment of actions on the port follows (see B, below, for energy).

The Government of Haiti agreed to the following actions related to the ports sector:

Action: Ensure that the Government of Haiti entity responsible for modernizing parastatals, such as the port, will oversee the procurement process for the award of a public-private partnership (PPP) contract for operation and maintenance of the Cap Haitien Port (CHP) in accordance with Haitian law.

Assessment:

The Ministry of Economy and Finance and the National Ports Authority (APN) have taken responsibility for conducting the PPP procurement. There continues to be a strong working relationship between APN and the International Finance Corporation, which is funded by USAID, to assist with finalizing the transaction documents that will result in an operations and maintenance agreement with a private sector entity.

Action: Ensure that the National Ports Authority (APN) completes the development of a draft Loi Organique (law) that takes into account the reforms discussed in the Port Reform Policy Note.

Assessment:

The APN-drafted legislation is ready to be presented to Parliament, though no date has been provided for when it will be presented. If Parliament passes the legislation, it will be submitted to the President for signature. The signed law takes effect when published in the official gazette (Le Moniteur).

Action: Confirm that APN has eliminated any conflict between its existing contracts and the planned PPP approach.

Assessment:

Cap Terminal had a long-term contract for certain container operations at the port. That contract was to expire December 2016. In mid-2016, APN converted that arrangement to a month-to-month contract that will run until the competitively selected port operation and maintenance contractor will be in place. This arrangement permits the port to continue to operate until a new firm is in place.

The process to select a private sector operator is in the final stages of the procurement process, with the pre-qualification process completed and the request for proposals being finalized.

Action: Confirm that APN does not intend to incur any new liabilities with respect to the CHP by signing or renewing contracts related to the Port unless such liabilities can be without compensation or penalty with a maximum of one month’s notice.

Assessment:

APN understands it is not to undertake any new contracts or leasing arrangements at the Port. To date, no new contracts or agreements have been issued by APN for operations at the CHP, except for the arrangement with Cap Terminal S.A. noted above.

Action: Confirm that APN will undertake reorganization and staffing of the Cap Haitien Directorate of APN to enhance its regulatory functions at the CHP; and direct Administration of Customs (AGD) to undertake reforms and engage with USAID and USAID partners with respect to reforms needed to improve customs services at the port.

Assessment:

The USAID contractor is in place providing assistance (training and organizational structuring) in developing the capacity of APN to oversee the private sector operator. Also, the USAID contractor is advising AGD on approaches to improve customs operations for the CHP. Equipment has been identified and training modules prepared. The training is scheduled for early 2018.

B. In the energy sector the Government of Haiti has agreed to the following actions:

Action: The Government of Haiti commits to install updated electricity rates reflecting cost of service for all categories of consumers of the mini-utility in the north.

Assessment:

With the new government in place, USAID discussed the need for changes in the electricity rates for all customers of the mini-utility in the north. The Government of Haiti was clear they are not prepared to further provide any subsidy to cover losses. The result was an agreement to institute electricity rates that reflect the cost of service. New rates went into effect in early 2017 with three gradual increases for residential consumers already implemented and the first of two increases for the main industrial park tenant instituted. It was also agreed that any new tenant in the industrial park will pay the full cost reflective electricity rates, right from the beginning. In a signed implementation letter, the Government of Haiti committed to competitively award a commercial concession to a private sector entity to operate and maintain the mini-utility as a profit-making venture. USAID’s technical assistance contractor has prepared the concession documents for the Government of Haiti, and the documents are under final legal review.

Action: The Government of Haiti and local governments must be proactive in advancing sustainable electric distribution by supporting the operator’s efforts to disconnect non‑paying customers.

Assessment:

Electricity theft remains a major challenge. The USAID funded operations and maintenance contractor has been aggressive in disconnecting the illegal connections and is working with local community leaders to proactively assist in reducing losses. For properly connected customers (those with service drops and meters at the houses), the collection rates, even with the higher electricity charges, are still around 90 percent.

C. To help fulfill the objectives of the Strategy, the Government of Haiti must strengthen individual technical capacity and institutional management and leadership in the health sector.

The biggest challenge facing the Haitian health sector is lack of sufficient domestic financial resources. National funding for the health sector has declined over the past seven years, reaching a low in 2017 of 4.3 percent of the national budget. As external resources decline, the Government of Haiti must allocate greater funding to essential public health services, including immunization, surveillance and primary care, as well as basic operations and maintenance of the facilities themselves. The U.S. government remains committed to assisting the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) with such an undertaking. To develop a pathway to sustainability in the health sector, the MSPP must develop a firm understanding of the cost of providing quality care to the Haitian population and advocate for adequate resources. The Executive and Parliament must also make funding Haiti’s health services a higher priority and assume greater responsibility as donor funds disappear. USAID continues to assist the MSPP in its efforts to increase country ownership of the health system through interventions at the central and departmental levels. The focus remains on health care costing and prioritizing, standardizing and providing a package of essential health services throughout the country, stocktaking and capacity building for the health workforce, and creating unified, national supply chain and information systems. USAID and the World Bank support the MSPP’s results-based financing strategy that seeks to enhance facility performance and improve health outcomes.

D. The Government of Haiti has proved a strong partner on Haitian National Police (HNP) growth and professionalization. Government of Haiti budget support for the HNP, however, has not kept pace with force growth or increased operational demands, requiring continued donor support to ensure that the police can be effective. Other challenges have included construction delays resulting from a lack of qualified construction personnel and firms, and delays obtaining land title for project sites. While senior Government of Haiti officials have made a point of publicly calling for efforts to combat pretrial detention, the Government of Haiti must take steps to adopt and implement long-awaited legislation on criminal and penal code reform to modernize its justice sector and to address the severe overcrowding and pre‑trial detention challenges in Haitian prisons.

E. To establish the rule of law and protect the rights of citizens accused of crimes, the Haitian government must take steps to establish the independence and efficacy of the judicial system.

USAID programs have promoted judicial independence in Haiti, while building the capacities of judicial actors and institutions and laying the basis for comprehensive reform to take place in the sector. The Improving Justice Service Delivery and Sector Reform in Haiti project, or “PROJUSTICE,” which began in July 2009 and ended in August 2016, worked with the Government of Haiti to improve the delivery of justice services and access to justice. These elements are essential for promoting stability and security, improving citizens’ confidence in their government institutions, and improving human rights for its citizens. The project worked with the Ministry of Justice and Public Security (MOJ) and the High Judicial Council (CSPJ), and it targeted courts, prosecutors’ offices, prisons, bar associations in six jurisdictions, and civil society organizations. The project helped train hundreds of justice sector personnel on case management, case tracking, investigation techniques, legal writing, procedural deadlines, and judicial orders that can be used to encourage compliance with procedural timelines. PROJUSTICE also established Haiti’s first computerized Case Management Information system in four Haitian jurisdictions to help expedite the processing of cases involving detainees in prolonged pretrial detention. Free legal assistance was provided for thousands of indigent defendants and detainees in prolonged pretrial detention. A limited-scope impact evaluation of this activity by USAID estimated that sponsored legal assistance reduced pre-trial detention by an average of 3.7 months per defendant.

The Justice Sector Strengthening Program (JSSP) launched in October 2016 and is scheduled to end in February 2021. With this project, USAID seeks to advance core justice system strengthening while building the foundations of judicial reform, fostering political support, and addressing relevant justice issues in the short-to-medium term. In line with USAID’s approach to engage in partnerships with local stakeholders, JSSP’s vision is to transition responsibility incrementally in each project activity toward full government ownership over the next five years. USAID through JSSP supports the new Haitian government and other key stakeholders to achieve significant developments in Haiti’s justice sector, including technical support to the MOJ for the development and presentation of the draft Penal Code and Penal Procedure Code to Haiti’s Parliament in 2017, and technical and logistical support to the senate judiciary committee to conduct public hearings to gather feedback from civil society on the proposed codes.

USAID also supported Haiti’s Presidential Commission on Penal Reform, which drafted the new codes. After completing the drafts of the new codes, the Commission began working on a code implementation plan that will allow the MOJ to adequately plan for the application of the codes during the next budget planning exercise. To facilitate this process, USAID partnered with the OAS Centro de Estudios de Justicia de las Américas (CEJA) to work with the members of the Budget Commission on issues relevant to penal code reforms based on lessons learned in Latin America. USAID’s technical assistance to the MOJ led to the adoption of the draft bill on legal assistance by the Council of Ministers and the vote of that bill by the senate a few months later. The draft legal assistance bill defines a Haitian government legal aid system similar to a public defender’s office that will provide free legal assistance to people unable to pay for legal services. To combat pretrial detention and prison overcrowding, USAID supported special, expedited hearings at the Port-au-Prince District Court in support of the new MOJ’s “Prevention of Pre-Trial Detention Plan;” in one month (April 2017), this intervention expedited 81 cases to decision at the subject court.

USAID also provided a sub-grant to the Federation of Haitian Bar Associations to support a special legal assistance program in areas affected by Hurricane Matthew. The grant enabled citizens to obtain or replace civic registry documents such as national identification cards, birth and death certificates, and land property titles. From October 2016 to date, 1,872 (884 men/988 women) beneficiaries requested assistance through this special program. USAID also continued its support to the CSPJ through technical and logistical support to the Judicial Inspection Unit (JIU). This support enabled the JIU to conduct two disciplinary inspections, two routine inspections, and courtesy visits to eight District Courts.

F. Poor governance, which arises from Government of Haiti institutions’ lack of independence and accountability, is a fundamental challenge to development. Lack of transparency and accountability in the management of public resources contributes to underfunding of state institutions. As a result, Haiti struggles to provide basic services in health, education, security, and infrastructure for the economic and physical well-being of its citizens. International donors have repeatedly stepped up to cover the gap by financing significant percentages of the budgets. The Government of Haiti’s dependence on donor largesse to provide basic services is neither sustainable nor conducive to long-term development.

Assessment:

The Haitian government has begun to recognize the need to bring transparency and accountability to public financial management. In June 2017, the Government of Haiti and key donors signed a Partnership Framework on Budgetary Support and Support for Public Finance Reforms that, inter alia, aims to increase the effectiveness of economic governance and implement public finance reforms.

The Government of Haiti’s current public financial management reform plan covers six areas of intervention: (1) Mobilization of Internal and External Resources; (2) Treasury and Accounting; (3) Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS); (4) Global Budget Framework; (5) External Control; and (6) Governance of Local Finance.

Since 2011, USAID has had a sustained commitment to strengthening Government of Haiti public financial management systems for greater aid effectiveness and sustainability. In 2012, USAID conducted the first step toward on-budget assistance, a public financial management risk assessment overview of the Government of Haiti systems. In 2015, USAID performed the second step of the public financial management risk assessment focused on the Economic and Social Assistance Fund, an autonomous Government of Haiti entity, and a limited assessment of the Ministry of Health. These risk assessments help design projects that will use and strengthen Government of Haiti public financial management systems. For example, the public financial management assessment and risk mitigation plan for the Ministry of Health provided a baseline for targeted technical assistance to improve its budgeting and financial management and inform the design for future USAID programs with the Ministry of Health.

Further, to strengthen Government of Haiti public financial management systems, USAID has been providing technical assistance to the Ministry of Economy and Finance, the Tax Authority, the Office of Management and Human Resources, and the Programming and Analysis Units of the Ministry of Planning. From 2004 to 2010, USAID worked with the Ministry of Economy and Finance to implement the IFMS, which resulted in a single network linking the 51 budget institutions in the Port-au-Prince area and the provision of hardware, software, and training to 13 of the Government of Haiti’s largest budget institutions to facilitate the efficient and secure exchange of data. In 2014-2015, USAID facilitated linking the Office of Management and Human Resources’ management system to the payroll system of the Ministry of Economy and Finance to eliminate ghost workers. In 2016, USAID provided information technology (IT) equipment to the Tax Authority’s headquarters and 15 regional offices, automating many of them for the first time.

In 2017, USAID completed the renovation of the Ministry of Economy and Finance Network Operation Center and equipped it with state of the art servers; repaired 20 IFMS network sites and started installing new communication equipment; developed two Unified Exchange Platform web services for five institutions so they could exchange information more efficiently and securely; connected 10 municipalities’ tax collection operations with the central Tax Authority (DGI) office; connected two regional Supreme Audit Institutions offices with the DGI central office to facilitate the audit of municipal finances; provided IT equipment to 13 regional DGI sites to connect them to the central office; and developed new functionalities for the Human Resources Management System, including on-boarding of new civil servants, monthly affirmation, career management, and a payroll interface with the Treasury. Since 2013, USAID has worked with nine municipalities to improve tax collection, management, and service delivery, which resulted in increased tax revenue and transparency in these municipal cities.

In addition, the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Technical Assistance, with USAID funding, provides technical assistance to improve revenue administration, cash management, and budget execution and control. USAID also sponsors the Ministry of Economy and Finance and Supreme Audit Institution Management staff to attend the annual International Consortium on Governmental Financial Management to build their capacity in public financial management.

USAID almost exclusively provides technical assistance rather than direct budgetary transfer to the Government of Haiti. However, two pilot programs in the health sector provide direct funding to the Government of Haiti. In one project of $2.7 million, USAID directly funds the Ministry of Economy and Finance’s Technical Execution Unit that provides oversight of the construction of the Port-au-Prince General Hospital, with reimbursement payments against the completion of identified milestones. In the second, USAID is implementing a small government-to-government results-based financing pilot project, with a budget of $750,000, with the Ministry of Health to provide monetary incentives to Haitian health care workers upon the achievement of set objectives. Meanwhile, USAID is considering second stage risk assessments focusing on elements of the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Economy and Finance, the Ministry of Planning, the Ministry of Social Affairs, and Ministry of Education to further support Government of Haiti systems to achieve greater aid effectiveness and sustainability.

U.S. Department of State

The Lessons of 1989: Freedom and Our Future