Strategic Goal 5: International Crime and Drugs - Performance Results for Performance Goal 1

FY 2003 Performance and Accountability Report
Bureau of Resource Management
December 2003
Report

VII. Performance Results

 

PERFORMANCE GOAL 1

International trafficking in drugs, persons, and other illicit goods disrupted and criminal organizations dismantled

 

I/P #1: ANDEAN COUNTERDRUG INITIATIVE

Reinforce the unified campaign against drug trafficking and the terrorists who benefit from it.

OUTCOME INDICATOR

Indicator #1: Foreign Cultivation of Coca, Opium Poppy, and Marijuana[1] (in Hectares)

FY Results History 2000
  1. Coca: 185,000
  2. Opium Poppy: 209,465
  3. Marijuana: 8,700
2001
  1. Coca: 223,700
  2. Opium Poppy: 143,000
  3. Marijuana: 8,900
2002
  1. Coca: 205,450
  2. Opium Poppy: 141,200
  3. Marijuana: Data not yet available.
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results
  1. Coca: Data not yet available.
  2. Opium Poppy: 127,000 (Afghanistan, Burma, and Laos).
  3. Marijuana: Data not yet available (Mexico only).
Target
  1. Coca: 180,000
  2. Opium Poppy: 125,000
  3. Marijuana: 5,600
Rating
  1. TBD, but projected to be On or Above Target for coca.
  2. TBD, but projected to be Below Target for opium poppy.
  3. TBD, but projected to be On Target for marijuana.
Impact Coca: The reduction in coca cultivation is the core of the U.S. effort to curtail supply and disrupt and undercut the viability of cocaine trafficking operations, as happened in Peru and Bolivia in the 1990s and which should now be starting to take place in Colombia.

Opium Poppy: The downward trend in Southeast Asia continues, primarily as a result of a sharp decrease (39 percent) in Burma. However, figures for Afghanistan, once again the world's leading producer, essentially doubled in 2003, to 61,000 hectares. In sum, global cultivation of opium poppy will probably decline very slightly in 2003 but will fall short of the
intended target.
Other Issues The CIA's Crime and Narcotics Center provides estimates for cultivation of coca and opium poppy based on overhead photography and limited ground verification. Not all 2003 data and estimates are available. Estimates for coca cultivation in Peru and Bolivia this year have been completed but the estimates for Colombia, the world's largest producer, will not be available until late February or early March. The opium poppy cultivation estimates for Columbia and Mexico are not yet available.

Note 1: Mexico only.

OUTCOME INDICATOR

Indicator #2: Potential Production of Cocaine and Heroin in Key Source Countries (in Metric Tons)

FY Results History 2000
  1. Cocaine: 840
  2. Heroin: 498
2001
  1. Cocaine: 995
  2. Heroin: 123
2002
  1. Cocaine: 880
  2. Heroin: 235[2]
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results
  1. Cocaine: TBD
  2. Heroin: 337 (est.)
Target
  1. Cocaine: 759
  2. Heroin: 240
Rating
  1. TBD, but projected to be On Target for cocaine.
  2. TBD, but projected to be Below Target for heroin.
Impact The projected decline in coca cultivation should lead to an overall decline in cocaine production and trafficking profit. Although the total hectares of opium poppy under cultivation will likely decline very slightly in 2003, the large increase in the proportion of Afghan opium poppy to world totals (Afghan cultivation essentially doubled in 2003) will likely mean a substantial increase in the potential overall production of heroin because Afghan poppy plants normally have higher yields than plants from Southeast Asia.
Other Issues Includes major producers Afghanistan, Burma, and Laos. Estimates for Mexico, Colombia, and others not yet available. While Colombia and Mexico are relatively small producers, they supply approximately 90 percent of the illicit heroin entering the U.S. Most of the opium and heroin from Southeast and Southwest Asia goes to Europe and Russia or remains in the region.
Note 2: Does not include estimate for Colombia, which is not yet available.

OUTCOME INDICATOR

Indicator #3: Seizures of Cocaine (HCI/base) (Columbia, Peru, Bolivia) (in Metric Tons)

FY Results History 2000 Cocaine: 86
2001 Cocaine: 93
2002 Cocaine: 132
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results Data not yet available.
Target Cocaine: 110
Rating TBD, but projected to be On Target.
Impact Increased seizures normally reflect greater and more effective interdiction activity on the part of counternarcotics forces. Seizures disrupt operations and raise the cost of doing business for traffickers.

 

I/P #2: IMPROVE ANTI-TRAFFICKING PROSECUTORIAL AND PROTECTION CAPACITIES

Train law enforcement officials and service providers to identify trafficking rings and victims, effectively use existing legislation, weed out corruption, and ensure protections for victims.

OUTCOME INDICATOR

Indicator #4: Progress Toward the Elimination of Trafficking in Persons (TIP)

FY Results History 2000 Baseline: The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386) called for the creation of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons.
2001
  1. The Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons was established.
  2. First Trafficking in Persons Report was issued.
2002
  1. The President's Interagency Taskforce and Senior Policy Advisory Group coordinated anti-trafficking policy.
  2. Ratification package for UN Trafficking in Persons Protocol was sent to the Senate.
  3. Second Trafficking in Persons Report was issued.
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results
  1. Thirty percent of Tier 2 and Tier 3 countries use Department assistance to develop or further anti-trafficking initiatives.
  2. Third TIP Report was issued and includes twenty-six additional countries for a total of 116.
  3. Promoted "best practices" through five new bilateral and regional initiatives among source, transit, and destination countries.
  4. Forty-five countries ratified UN Trafficking in Persons Protocol.
Target
  1. Thirty percent of Tier 2 and 3 countries use Department assistance to develop or further anti-trafficking initiatives.[3]
  2. Expand TIP report to include twenty additional countries with significant number of trafficking victims.
  3. Promote best practices via five new bilateral and regional initiatives among source, transit, and destination countries.
  4. Twenty-five countries ratify UN Trafficking in Persons Protocol.
Rating
  1. On Target
  2. Above Target
  3. TBD (expect to be On Target)
  4. Significantly Above Target
Impact Reason for Significantly Exceeding Performance Target: The annual Trafficking in Persons Report has motivated many governments to take action against trafficking and be more forthcoming with information on their efforts. There is increasing collaboration between governments and civil society groups to prosecute traffickers and protect victims. There is also increasing coordination among governments of source, transit, and destination countries.

Note 3: Tier 1, 2 and 3 country ratings: A rating scale used to designate levels of governmental efforts to combat trafficking on the basis of minimum standards. First Tier countries are those that are in full compliance with standards. Second Tier countries are those not in full compliance but which are making good efforts to comply. Third Tier countries neither fully comply with the minimum standards nor make significant efforts to do so.

OUTPUT INDICATOR

Indicator #5: Parties to the 1988 UN Drug Convention

FY Results History 2000 152
2001 162
2002 165
FY 2003
Data
2003 Results 170
Target 170
Rating On Target
Impact The 1988 Drug Convention is the primary source of international law for setting standards against illicit drugs and facilitating international cooperation in combating them. States Parties to the Convention are legally committed to carry out its provisions.
Other Issues Most countries have now ratified the Convention, which means that they are legally obligated to carry out the provisions of the Convention. The remaining states are either not likely to ratify in the foreseeable future or are not important in terms of drug trafficking. Therefore, beginning in FY 2004, this indicator was discontinued.

 

Some of 40 kilos of opium and other drug trafficking evidence are on display at a news conference announcing the dismantling of an opium trafficking operation headed by Ardash Harytoonian of Glendale, Calif., at DEA headquarters in Los Angeles. A total of 14 arrests were made of members of the group that smuggled opium from Afghanistan and Iran into the U.S. � AP Photo/Reed Saxon

Photo showing 40 kilos of opium and other drug trafficking evidence on display at a news conference announcing the dismantling of an opium trafficking operation headed by Ardash Harytoonian of Glendale, California.