Strategic Goal 6: American Citizens - Public Benefit, Selected Performance Trends, and Strategic Context

FY 2006 Performance and Accountability Report
Bureau of Resource Management
November 2006
Report

I. Public Benefit

Photo showing an American citizen with his luggage on top of his head waiting with hundreds of fellow Americans to enter the processing center in order to be evacuated from a beach north of the capital Beirut, Lebanon, July 2006.

An American citizen with his luggage on top of his head waits with hundreds of fellow Americans to enter the processing center in order to be evacuated from a beach north of the capital Beirut, Lebanon, July 2006. AP/Wide World

The Department of State has no more vital responsibility than the protection of U.S. citizens while they are overseas. Approximately 4 million Americans reside abroad, and Americans make about 60 million trips outside the United States each year.

Through Passport Services, the Department of State provides the American public with the world's premier travel, citizenship and identity document. The Department continues to enhance the integrity of the U.S. passport, while maintaining the highest standards for excellence in customer service. The Biometrics collection program for U.S. passports leads the way toward the next generation of international travel documents - e-passports that contain a chip on which biometric and biographic information is recorded. These improvements will further strengthen international border security by ensuring both that the document is authentic and that the person carrying the e-passport is the American citizen to whom that document was issued. In addition, to alert Americans to conditions that may affect safety and travel abroad, the Department of State disseminates threat assessments to posts around the world and announcements to the public as quickly as possible, using all available means. The Department uses websites, its Consular Information Program, a global Internet-based registration system, its overseas American citizen warden program, and the Overseas Security Advisory Council, a government-private sector partnership, to foster creative solutions to security related issues affecting U.S. private sector interests.

U.S. embassies and consulates offer a broad range of services to U.S. citizens abroad, such as assistance to U.S. citizens in case of death, illness, destitution, arrest, imprisonment, and falling victim to a crime. The Department must plan for the unexpected and be prepared to respond to crises abroad, such as transportation or natural disasters, and other situations in which U.S. citizens need assistance, including incidents of terrorism and serious crimes such as hostage taking, homicide, assault, domestic violence, child abuse, and international parental child abduction. The Department actively encourages host governments to adopt measures to protect Americans from crime and social and political unrest and works to ensure that Americans are equitably treated by the host country criminal justice system. The Department assists host governments to develop effective investigative, prosecutorial, and other judicial capabilities to respond to American victims of crime, and expand their cooperation and information sharing with the United States in order to prevent terrorist attacks on U.S. citizens. The Department also works with foreign governments, other USG agencies and international organizations on transportation security initiatives and encourages countries to implement intercountry adoption systems that protect the interests of children, birth parents, and U.S. adoptive parents.

 

II. Selected Performance Trends

 

Number of Business Days in which
90% of Passports are Issued
  2003 2004 2005 2006
Number of Business Days 23 21 19 19

 


E-Passport Features
Photo showing the passport's data page, now on page two, which has thicker paper than other pages and a watermark; the Great Seal and flag design is new; and all pages now have random fibers that fluoresce under UV.

New Features: The data page, now on page two, has thicker paper than other pages and a watermark; the Great Seal and flag design is new; and all pages now have random fibers that fluoresce under UV.

The book inventory number, on inside back cover, will also be the passport number. In contrast to the 1998 version, the data descriptors (e.g., "Sex/Sexe/Sexo") are not pre-printed, but rather printed at the same time as the personalized data when the book is issued. Therefore, this text will be black for all passports - diplomatic, official and tourist.

Photo showing the passport's green-to-gold color-shifting USA text.

"USA" is printed in green-to-gold color-shifting optically variable security ink. The color seen depends upon the viewing angle.

Photo showing pre-printed text in the passport which will match the cover color: black, maroon or blue.

Pre-printed text in the passport will match the cover color: black, maroon or blue.

Photo showing a closeup of the passport's microprinting in the background design.

Microprinting in the background design.

 

 

III. Strategic Context

Shown below are the performance goals, initiatives/programs, and the major resources, bureaus and partners that contribute to accomplishment of the American Citizens strategic goal. Acronyms are defined in the glossary at the back of this publication.

STRATEGIC GOAL: AMERICAN CITIZENS
(Components that Contribute to Goal Accomplishment)
Performance Goal
(Short Title)
Initiative/Program Major Resources Lead Bureau(s) External Partners
Assistance for U.S. Citizens Abroad American Citizen Services D&CP CA DOJ, DoD, HHS, DOT; NCMEC, other NGOs
Passport Issuance and Integrity Secure Passport Issuance D&CP CA GPO, Treasury, DHS, SSA, USPS, USMS, HHS; ICAO; NAPHSIS, AAMVA

 


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