Note 7. Property and Equipment, Net

Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services
Report
November 15, 2016


 

 

 



Property and Equipment, Net balances at September 30, 2016 and 2015, are shown in the following table (dollars in millions).

Property and Equipment, Net Balances
At September 30, 2016 and 2015
(dollars in millions)
Major Classes 2016 2015
Cost Accumulated
Depreciation
Net Value Cost Accumulated
Depreciation
Net Value
Real Property:
Overseas —
Land and Land Improvements $2,651 $(82) $2,569 $2,450 $(73) 2,377
Buildings and Structures 19,872 (7,499) 12,373 18,384 (6,825) 11,559
Construction-in-Progress 3,820 3,820 3,276 3,276
Assets Under Capital Lease 175 (58) 117 146 (41) 105
Leasehold Improvements 573 (360) 213 537 (331) 206
Domestic —
Structures, Facilities and Leaseholds 1,372 (489) 883 1,355 (451) 904
Construction-in-Progress 197 197 153 153
Land and Land Improvements 81 (8) 73 81 (8) 73
Total — Real Property 28,741 (8,496) 20,245 26,382 (7,729) 18,653
Personal Property:
Aircraft 789 (432) 357 887 (422) 465
Vehicles 972 (585) 387 991 (538) 453
Communication Equipment 29 (20) 9 28 (19) 9
ADP Equipment 261 (126) 135 188 (110) 78
Reproduction Equipment 9 (6) 3 9 (6) 3
Security Equipment 268 (106) 162 239 (89) 150
Internal Use Software 265 (202) 63 455 (381) 74
Software-in-Development 205 205 160 160
Other Equipment 351 (120) 231 302 (120) 182
Total — Personal Property 3,149 (1,597) 1,552 3,259 (1,685) 1,574
Total Property and Equipment, Net $31,890 $(10,093) $21,797 $29,641 $(9,414) $20,227

Stewardship Property and Equipment; Heritage Assets

The Department maintains collections of art, furnishings and real property (Culturally Significant Property) that are held for public exhibition, education and official functions for visiting chiefs of State, heads of government, foreign ministers and other distinguished foreign and American guests. As the lead institution conducting American diplomacy, the Department uses this property to promote national pride and the distinct cultural diversity of American artists, as well as to recognize the historical, architectural and cultural significance of America’s holdings overseas.

There are nine separate collections of art and furnishings: the Diplomatic Reception Rooms Collection, the Art Bank Program, the Art in Embassies Program, the Cultural Heritage Collection, the Library Rare and Special Book Collection, the Secretary of State’s Register of Culturally Significant Property, the U.S. Diplomacy Center, the Blair House, and the International Boundary and Water Commission. The collections, activity of which is shown in the following table and described more fully in the Required Supplementary Information and Other Information sections of this report, consist of items that were donated, purchased using donated or appropriated funds. The Department provides protection and preservation services to maintain all Heritage Assets in good condition forever as part of America’s history.

Heritage Assets
For the Years Ended September 30, 2015 and 2016
  Diplomatic Reception Rooms Collection Art Bank Program Art in Embassies
Program
Cultural Heritage
Collection
Library Rare & Special Book Collection Secretary of State’s Register of Culturally Significant Property U.S. Diplomacy Center Blair House International Boundary and Water Commission
Description Collectibles – Art and furnishings from the period 1750 to 1825 Collection of American works of art on paper Collectibles – American works of art Collections include fine and decorative arts and other cultural objects Collectibles – Rare books and other publications of historic value Noncollection – Buildings of historic, cultural, or architectural significance Collectibles – Historic artifacts, art and other cultural objects Collections of fine and decorative arts, furnishings, artifacts, other cultural objects, rare books and archival materials in national historic landmark buildings Monuments that mark the international boundary between the United States and Mexico, Falcon International Dam and Power Plant
Acquisition and Withdrawal Acquired through donation or purchase using donated funds. Excess items are sold. Acquired through purchase. Excess items are transferred. Acquired through purchase or donation. Excess items are sold. The program provides assessment, preservation, and restoration as needed. Acquired through donation. Acquired through purchase. Excess items are sold. Acquired through donation or transfer.  Excess items are transferred. Acquired through purchase, donation or transfer. Excess items are transferred or disposed of via public sale. The monuments were constructed to mark the international boundary. The dam and power plant were constructed by the United States and Mexico pursuant to Water Treaty of 1944.
Condition Good to excellent Good to excellent Good to excellent Good to excellent Poor to good Poor to excellent Good to excellent Good to excellent Poor to good
Number of Assets – 9/30/2014 1,732 2,500 1,070 18,206 1,112 26 3,088 2,619  
Acquisitions 14 54 17 126 19   184 4  
Adjustments 104     235     9 1  
Disposals 26   18 158 1     10  
Number of Assets – 9/30/2015 1,824 2,554 1,069 18,409 1,130 26 3,281 2,614 140
Deferred Maintenance – 9/30/2015 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A $3,679,000 N/A N/A $278,485
Acquisitions 9 46 56 46 64 7 575    
Adjustments 41   25 245     247 66  
Disposals 56   1 362 3   67 75  
Number of Assets – 9/30/2016 1,818 2,600 1,149 18,338 1,191 33 4,036 2,605 140
Deferred Maintenance – 9/30/2016 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A $2,996,000 N/A N/A $974,000
Photo showing the Athens Chancery, by architect Walter Gropius, one of the most celebrated representatives of the famed Bauhaus School, is a modern tribute to ancient Greek architecture.

The Athens Chancery, by architect Walter Gropius, one of the most celebrated representatives of the famed Bauhaus School, is a modern tribute to ancient Greek architecture. Department of State/OBO