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School Contact Information

Logo for Schutz American School

Schutz American School (SAS) is an independent, nonsectarian, coeducational day school which offers a premier educational program from early childhood (age two) through twelfth grade for students of all nationalities. The school was founded in 1924 and is one of the oldest International American Schools in the world.

Organization: The school is governed by a 13-member, self-perpetuating school board, serving renewable three-year terms.  A U.S. State Department seat is always reserved.

Curriculum: Schutz uses the American Common Core standards, Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS), ISTE standards for technology, and the AERO standards for most other subjects. The SAS early childhood program is play-based.  SAS is working towards becoming a model for inquiry and student-centered learning in the region. The school focuses on developing agency within the students to develop a lifelong learner. The school is a candidate for the International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years Program and Middle Years Program. SAS offers the Advanced Placement (AP) program at the high school and have over 60% of the students taking at least one AP course. The assessment plan is developed to ensure SAS remains relevant and competitive with like schools in the region. SAS utilizes PSAT, SAT, and Measures of Academic Progress (MAP). The language of instruction is English.  French is taught as a foreign language beginning in the elementary school and proceeding to AP French.  Arabic is taught as both a native and foreign language. The school is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

Faculty: In the 2021-2022 school year, SAS has 82 total staff including 58 teachers. All staff are required to have a teaching license, bachelor’s degree and/or master’s degree.

Enrollment: At the beginning of the 2021-2022 school year, enrollment is at 275. Egyptian nationals who have obtained a waiver from the Egyptian Ministry of Education to attend SAS.  The U.S. consulate in Alexandria closed in 2019.  SAS remains the primary center for American culture and education in the second largest city in Egypt. There are no dependents of U.S. government employees enrolled in the school at this time.

Facilities: The school operates on two campuses – one for the elementary school (early childhood-grade 5) and one for the middle and high schools (grades 6-12). Athletic facilities include lighted courts for tennis, basketball, and volleyball; a swimming pool; and a gymnasium/weight room. Other facilities include an auditorium with theater capabilities, two conference rooms, a large multipurpose room, two libraries, two computer laboratories, an art center, a cafeteria, and a canteen.  The school completed significant renovations in the 2020-21 school year and more renovations and improvements are planned in 2021-22.

Finances: In the 2021-2022 school year; about 97% of the school’s income is derived from regular day school tuition and registration fees. Annual tuition rates are as follows: PK: $7,085; kindergarten-grade 5: $13,330; grades 6-8: $15,900; and grades 9-12: $16,612. The school also charges a one-time registration fee of $4,000 and an annual infrastructure fee of $1,180, as well as an optional bus fee and an optional lunch fee. All fees payable in U.S. dollars by non-Egyptians and in Egyptian pounds by Egyptians.  (Fees quoted above in U.S. dollars.)

This Fact Sheet is intended to provide general information. Prospective users of the schools may wish to inquire further of A/OPR/OS or contact the school directly for more specific and up-to-the-minute information. Information and statistics are current as of September 2021 and are provided by the school.

U.S. Department of State

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