The U.S. Vision for the Indo-Pacific Region” reporting tour for journalists from Indonesia, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Malaysia took place in Washington, DC, California, and Hawaii to explore areas of cooperation between the United States and our allies and partners, and the benefits this cooperation brings to the region.

On the second day of  “The U.S. Vision for the Indo-Pacific Region” reporting tour, participants from Indonesia, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Malaysia met with a representative from the US Chamber of Commerce for a briefing focused on economic growth and cooperation between the US and the Indo- Pacific region.  Among the topics discussed were how the US competes with China on investment opportunities in South East Asia and what investors are looking for when considering a country for investment.  Questions were asked about how their governments can create an environment that is “investor friendly” and how can they explore more areas of cooperation between the United States and the region. The group also met with NOAA representatives to talk about the Marine debris program focusing on international cooperation. They concluded the day at the National Bureau of Asian Research.

On the 3rd day in Washington, journalists met with USG officials from State, AID and OPIC. The tour focused on investment, economics, and infrastructure development during the day’s meetings. They heard from the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs Deputy Assistant Secretary Roland Marcellus; Robert Strayer, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Cyber and International Communications and Information Policy; USAID Acting Assistant Administrator Gloria Steele; and officials from OPIC who highlighted the economic pillar of the Indo-Pacific strategy marked by free, fair and reciprocal trade and investment environments.

In San Francisco, the journalists met with representatives from “The Asia Foundation” to talk about the work they are doing in the region to promote the empowerment of citizens by sharing information on areas of legal rights, governance, business and financial literacy and education.  The programs discussed are based on communication and technology to empower women and minorities and to promote common solutions in governance. They also traveled to Stanford University, where they listened to experts from the Walter H Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), part of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

They heard from Lt. Governor of California and former Ambassador Eleni Kounalakis who discussed California’s diverse population and the many areas of cooperation between California and Southeast Asia. After that, the group visited the CALASIAN Chamber of Commerce  who discussed commercial engagement in Southeast Asia. Later that day, the group met with the California Chamber of Commerce.

U.S. Department of State

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