More information about Belize is available on the Belize Page and from other Department of State publications and other sources listed at the end of this fact sheet.

U.S.-BELIZE RELATIONS

The United States and Belize continue to maintain close and cordial relations. The United States is home to the largest Belizean community outside Belize, estimated to be more than 85,000. Belize’s economic growth, good governance, and security are important to U.S. interests in the region. The United States and Belize are working as partners to strengthen citizen security and prevent transnational crime. The two countries have mutual legal assistance treaties with each other. Both governments seek to control the flow of irregular migrants to the United States through Belize.

U.S. Assistance to Belize

The U.S. Strategy for Central America (Strategy) guides U.S. diplomatic efforts and foreign assistance in the region. The Strategy is a bipartisan, multi-year U.S. government plan covering all seven Central American countries (Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama). The Strategy aims to secure U.S. borders and protect American citizens by addressing the security, governance, and economic drivers of illegal immigration and transnational crime, while increasing opportunities for U.S. and other businesses. The Strategy focuses on three overarching lines of action: 1) promoting prosperity, 2) enhancing security, and 3) improving governance.

The United States works closely with the Government of Belize to fight narcotics, human, and other types of illicit trafficking and organized crime. The U.S. government seeks to strengthen citizen security and improve the government’s capacity to confront and disrupt criminal organizations. U.S. programs are assisting Belize to professionalize its police force, build its justice sector capacity, and improve its capacity to secure its borders. U.S. grants to Belizean civil society focus on improving governance by strengthening the ties between civil society and the government, improving service delivery, and strengthening capacity within both civil society and government civil service.  The Belize Defense Force receives military assistance from the United States, including training, medical assistance programs, and programs to construct and renovate schools. The U.S. military was also instrumental in establishing Belize’s Coast Guard and continues to play a role in building its capacity. The Peace Corps operates public health programs in Belize.

Bilateral Economic Relations

The United States is Belize’s principal trading partner and a major source of investment funds. According to the latest available trade data, in 2017 the United States accounted for 19.6 percent of Belize’s total exports and 35.6 percent of its total imports. Some 185 U.S. companies have operations in Belize. Tourism attracts the most foreign direct investment, although U.S. investment also is found in the telecommunications, energy, and agricultural sectors. A Country Commercial Guide for Belize is available from the U.S. Embassy’s Economic/Commercial section.

Belize’s Membership in International Organizations

Belize became a member of the United Nations following its 1981 independence from the United Kingdom. Belize and the United States belong to a number of the same international organizations, including the United Nations, Organization of American States, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization.

Bilateral Representation

Principal U.S. embassy officials are listed in the Department’s Key Officers List.

Belize maintains an embassy in the United States at 2535 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008 (tel: 202-332-9636).

More information about Belize is available from the Department of State and other sources, some of which are listed here:

CIA World Factbook Belize Page
U.S. Embassy
History of U.S. Relations With Belize
U.S. Census Bureau Foreign Trade Statistics
Export.gov International Offices Page
Library of Congress Country Studies
Travel Information

U.S. Department of State

The Lessons of 1989: Freedom and Our Future