The United States and Iraq are working collectively toward the common goal of a stable, secure, and prosperous Middle East.  Iraq is also a vital U.S. partner on a wide range of regional security issues.  The United States works with Iraq to increase cooperation on border security, maritime security, arms transfers, cybersecurity, conventional weapons destruction, and counterterrorism.  The access, basing, and overflight privileges granted by Iraq facilitate U.S. and Global Coalition operations against Al Qa’ida, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), and their regional and global affiliates.

The United States remains committed to deepening its strategic partnership with Iraq and the Iraqi people.  Under the Strategic Framework Agreement between Iraq and the United States, we remain dedicated to building Iraq’s defensive capabilities, providing security assistance, and working with Iraq to improve its stability and security – including through operations to prevent the reemergence of ISIS.  U.S. security cooperation activities are enabling Iraqi Security Forces’ (ISF) ability to respond to threats and conduct counter-terrorism operations, while supporting the long-term development of a modern, accountable, and professional ISF capable of defending Iraq, its people, and its borders while upholding the rule of law.

Since 2014, the U.S. Department of State provided Iraq with $1.2 billion in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) to improve Iraq’s long-term sustainment and logistics capabilities and fund ISF professionalization.  As ISIS emerged in Iraq, portions of this FMF funding were redirected to urgent counterterrorism requirements.  This assistance was critical to the success of Iraqi efforts to defeat ISIS, demonstrating the speed and flexibility of Department of State security assistance programs.  This assistance continues to stabilize liberated areas and improve Iraq’s overall security environment.

Since 2014, the U.S. Department of State provided Iraq with $4.2 million for International Military Education and Training (IMET).  Over 349 members of the ISF received training in the United States, including 24 members in FY 2018.  IMET provides professional military education and training to military students and is key to establishing lasting relationships with future leaders.  IMET courses increase military professionalization, enhance interoperability with U.S. forces, offer instruction on the law of armed conflict and human rights, provide technical and operational training, and create a deeper understanding of the United States.

Since 2014, the Department of Defense provided an additional $4.0 billion for the fight against ISIS to the ISF through the former Iraq Train and Equip Fund (ITEF), and the current Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund (CTEF).  This funding was applied to equip brigades with Tactical Vehicles (HMMWVs) and protective gear.

The U.S. has $19.7 billion in active government to government sales cases with Iraq under the Foreign Military (Sales FMS) system. FMS sales notified to Congress are listed here, and recent and significant prior sales include: Armed Bell 407GX Helicopters, pilot training for C-172, C-208, and T-6 aircraft, and equipment for two Peshmerga infantry brigades and two support artillery battalions.  Iraq also received over $2.77billion in FMF Credit Facilities (CF) in FY2016 – FY2017, which has allowed Iraq to pay for FMS purchases through borrowed funds, to be repaid over the designated period.

Since 2014, the U.S. also authorized the permanent export of over $7.2 billion in defense articles to Iraq via the Direct Commercial Sales (DCS) process.  The top categories of DCS to Iraq include:  fire control/night vision, military electronics, and tanks/military vehicles.

The United States has provided Iraq numerous systems under the Excess Defense Articles program, which offers excess U.S.-origin military equipment to allies and partners on a grant or sale basis, in an ‘as is, where is’ condition.  These included:  more than 300 Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles, armored vehicles, High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs), OH-58 helicopters, howitzers, and body armor, all of which directly contributed to the fight against ISIS.

The United States invested more than $468 million in Iraq since 2003 toward the clearance and safe disposal of landmines, unexploded ordnance (UXO), improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and excess conventional weapons and munitions, as documented in this separate Fact Sheet.

For further information, please contact the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, Office of Congressional and Public Affairs at PM-CPA@state.gov, and follow the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs on Twitter, @StateDeptPM.

U.S. Department of State

The Lessons of 1989: Freedom and Our Future