UNITED STATES SENATE

SUBJECT: Ambassadorial Nomination: Certificate of
Demonstrated Competence — Foreign Service
Act, Section 304(a)(4)

POST: Republic of Kenya
CANDIDATE: Margaret C. Whitman

Meg Whitman is the National Board Chair of Teach For America, a member of the Board of Directors of the Procter & Gamble Company and the General Motors Corporation and a member of the Board of Governors of Major League Soccer. She has served as President and CEO of three Fortune 100 companies: eBay Inc., the Hewlett Packard Company and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Ms. Whitman also served as CEO of FTD and Quibi and has held senior leadership positions at the Walt Disney Company, Hasbro, and Stride Rite Corporation. She was formerly a board member of the Nature Conservancy, a partner at Bain & Co., and the Republican Nominee for Governor of California in 2010. She earned a B.A. from Princeton University and an M.B.A. from Harvard University.
Skilled in strategy formulation, leading operational excellence, communication, negotiation, and the protection of intellectual property, Ms. Whitman has prioritized educational opportunities, diversity, entrepreneurship, small business empowerment, technology advancement, e-commerce, and global trade. She has worked successfully with heads of state, other senior government officials and business leaders across the globe. Her skills in building and leading diverse, highly effective teams make her well qualified to be Ambassador to the Republic of Kenya.

Ms. Whitman is the recipient of numerous honors, including inductions into the U.S. Business Hall of Fame, the Bay Area Business Hall of Fame, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Carnegie Mellon awarded her an Honorary Doctor of Business Practice degree and Fortune Magazine named her the Most Powerful Woman in Business in 2004. She has also received the Alumni Achievement Award from Harvard Business School and the Corporate Citizenship Award from the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering.

U.S. Department of State

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